noticed something about servers in that network thread..

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by HardTech, May 23, 2003.

  1. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    Are there any benefits to having an outdated server? I noticed some of you guys have a 486 as a server. What are the uses of such an archaic computer as a network server? Pros and cons?

    I have a few outdated PC's just sitting around.. like a 200 or 233mhz (MMX.. oh yeah) and I'm going to have a network of two PC's (possibly 3) next year. Could I just install some server software on the old 233 PC and have it run as a server?

    and what are the benefits of having a server as opposed to a client-client network?

    thanks
     
  2. crotchfruit

    crotchfruit Guest

    most people use their 'server' basically as a central file-storage location. since it's not running any major apps it doesn't need a heavy-duty cpu - so people just use whatever old hardware they have laying around. 486s running linux can also act as a NAT/router interface (again, recycling old hardware instead of buying new.)
     
  3. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    so I can add like a 120-gig hard drive and just put all of my movies on there? then I'll be able to see it from any computer? I think I could do that.

    is there any advantage of running a linux server over a windows server? I'm familiar with installing windows 2000 and networking with it, but I'm willing to learn Linux if it's a helluva lot better
     
  4. choler

    choler New Member

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    just make sure the 120 gig drive is compatible and able to run on the old PC and

    you are probably better off installing any flavor base-linux with things u need... learn damnit :) but win2k pro is fine too...
     
  5. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Even if the BIOS was capable of registering a 120MB drive, the architecture wouldn't be able to process the trasnfer speeds. Older drives were ATA33, and those old boards don't support much higher. Now a DNS, router, AD server - that's right up the alley.

    As for linux, it just doesn't have the security holes (or should I say, no one has exploited them yet ;)) that MS has. Also, you don't need a whole lot of memory or HD space to run it so it's ideal for those clunker computers.

    At any rate, I wouldn't use one for a file server unless perhaps I had a smokin SCSI setup or something, but for internet apps, they work well.

    Oh yeah, I'm assuming this isn't a home setup - if it is, then you won't notice any difference since there's only one load on the computer and the network speed will be the lynch pin in this case
     
  6. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    Why wouldn't the bios be capable of registering a 120MB drive? I would understand 120GB :fawk: :big grin: :big grin:

    I don't intend to have an ultra-fast SCSI setup for a file server. I'm completely content with ATA33 speeds as I've never known anything faster.

    And this IS for a home setup. I plan on having at least one computer hooked up to the server, more likely 2.

    Pardon my ignorance, but if I also use the server to access the internet, would I have to worry about security holes if I use a router? How would I go about using a router and the server? I'm not very network proficient.

    and what do you mean internet apps?
     
  7. crotchfruit

    crotchfruit Guest

    not really sure what you mean by this. if you're not planning on hosting a webserver or ftpserver, you don't have to treat the 'server machine' as anything special (since it's not.. it's just acting as your fileserver.)

    if you want to host a website on the server machine, you would, for example, forward port 80 through your router to the 'server'.

    if you don't have a router (i.e. you only have a hub or switch) you'll have to use your server as a router (or NAT), so it would go something like this:

    dsl/cable -> server -> hub -> all other computers.

    obviously the server would need two ethernet cards (or you could get a multi-jack card.)

    in either case, this route is hard to set up for newb, but there should be linux howtos (i.e. http://www.netfilter.org/unreliable-guides/NAT-HOWTO/ )
     
  8. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    Yay, a chance to use Visio! :big grin:

    (pardon the crappy diagram, but you get the idea)

    [​IMG]
     
  9. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    so if I were to use the server as just a file server, I just treat it like any other computer?

    thanks a bunch. Makes sense :)
     
  10. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    Pretty much, yes its just another computer. Typically, this "file server" would be outfitted with the hardware and software to get its job done and thats about it. You probably won't need a killer video card on a file server (so you may consider what this box will do and what gear it really needs inside - you'll probably find whatever it has will be fine for home use).

    I've got a P100 running as a web and file server and its configured to do NAT as well (although not being used for this task). I've got a 486DX2 66Mhz machine setup as a temperature monitoring computer (in theory, I guess I could call it a server, but its really just a standard PC). I've got 386DX 40Mhz machine without any hard drives. Its configured to do floppy NAT (although its not being used at the moment). They're not fast, but they are still useful.
     
  11. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    The only reason that I have a 486 as my firewall/webserver is because all my other machines are currently in use. Anything more than routing packets and that thing is slow as hell. Running apt-get to update the packages takes 30 mins to 2 hours depending on the number of packages. I am gathering stuff together from work to put together a P133 with 2 SCSI drives that should speed things up.

    I would never use something like that for my fileserver, the bus speeds on it just aren't fast enough.

    BTW, Chris where did you get Visio from :naughty:, did you buy it :eek3:.
     
  12. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    Get with me on AIM.

    (CompiledMonkey)
     
  13. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    Me?
     
  14. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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