New Diverter Valve v.Why didn't I do this before?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by deusexaethera, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I finally got around to ponying-up the $170 to get a Hyperboost diverter valve for my car. Eight months of research (and procrastination, admittedly) finally led me to conclude that my stock diverter valve was blown.

    (giggles) Yeah, the stock diverter was definitely blown. I think I'm going to be getting a speeding ticket in the near future.

    I have to say I'm quite pleased with the Hyperboost diverter. From what I'd read, it was Stratmosphere's version of the Forge diverter (they were Forge's first distributor, someone said) with a few design changes that Stratmosphere wasn't able to talk Forge into implementing. I don't know what those changes were, but it's definitely an effective piece of equipment. My car feels 50,000 miles younger now.

    After administering the time-honored "blow test" to the stock valve, I realized that the diaphragm had failed -- the standard mode of failure for the stock diverters, apparently. How do I know this? Because when I blow into the side connector, air comes out through the vacuum connector. That's not supposed to happen. I could have sworn it was jammed in the open position, but instead it turned out to be the fourth vacuum leak on my engine that I've discovered -- and the techs at the dealership completely missed it. I should just give up on car mechanics, I swear. If only I could find one that would fix what I tell him to fix, instead of trying to second-guess me.

    ...and yet, questions remain.

    Looking at the way the stock diverter valve was mounted (and I attached the new diverter the same way, no worries), I'm puzzled. If the diverter valve is supposed to be a pressure release, shouldn't it be mounted so that, in the case of a major overpressure, the air mass downstream from the turbocharger could force the valve to open even if the engine doesn't provide enough vacuum to actuate the valve?

    My car's diverter was mounted so that the side connector was on the pressurized side -- in other words, the valve itself was mounted at 90 degrees to the direction the pressurized air is coming from, instead of being mounted to face the pressurized air. How is the valve supposed to work in an oh-shit situation, if the pressurized air can't force it to open? Is there something I'm not taking into account?
     
  2. Nihilation

    Nihilation New Member

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    Don't think about it so much.
     
  3. Nihilation

    Nihilation New Member

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    In the case of a major overboost there's not much that can be done if the wastegate can't let it out, which is unlikely. Generally the turbo, I'm assuming you have a Audi or VW with a K03 or K04 can't actually hold massive amounts of boost to begin with. Spiking with those turbos shouldn't be much of a concern. The K03/04 turbo shaft is more likely to break before causing internal engine damage in the case that you actually spike and hold 20psi to say...redline.
     
  4. Nihilation

    Nihilation New Member

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    Furthermore, I have a few friends running just boost controllers, without a chip or added fuel. The computer will compensate for extra boost. There's nothing to worry about it seems. If it senses knocking it will cut down the timing and take other measures to prevent destruction of the engine.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Fair enough. My car doesn't have the electronic throttle, though, so it couldn't reduce the charge going into the engine unless it could slow down the turbo somehow.

    Are they using manual boost controllers, or standalone electronic boost controllers? If they're using manual boost controllers, what did they have to do to make it work right?
     
  6. Nihilation

    Nihilation New Member

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    I know one guy is using a manual boost controller for sure. I'm not sure what else he had to do, if anything at all...
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Where does it mount to? Does it go in place of the N75 valve, or what? I'm afraid I'm not as well-versed in the art of turbocharger mods as I would like to be.
     

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