A&P need to take pics of products for catalog

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by court-jester, Jul 13, 2003.

  1. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    i have a 4.0 mp and i need to take pix of products to put them in a catalog. can u give me some tips as to how to best take pics of products? what settings to use? what kind of back ground? i will be taking them at home so i dont exactly have any other professional equipment but any help is appricieted.
     
  2. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Couple of things to help you. Since you don't have a studio or lighting of any kind and you want to do this at home, I'd suggest that you use window light. First, buy a new grey or light blue sheet. You will use this as a background. Don't use black or pure white. Pastel colors are ok, but make sure you get a solid color. The alternative is to buy some seamless paper from a photograhy studio. Also buy a 2'x3' white cardboard or foamcore.

    Next, set up a card table next to a north facing window. The idea is that you don't want direct sunlight streaming in. Drape the sheet over the table and tape the rest to a wall (or broom hung horizontally) so as to make a "cyc" backdrop. (a background where the "floor" and the wall have no joint) Don't worry about getting the wrinkles out of the sheet, in fact, a wrinkled sheet oftens looks better.

    Set your camera on a tripod. Very important. Place your products on the table and frame your shots so that your products pretty much fill the entire frame. You don't want the photos to come out with the products real small in the frame. Focus on the front of the product. Take your white cardboard or foamcore and set it opposite the window light or shadow side of the subject to reflect the light back into the shadows. Take an exposure reading with your camera and take a photo at that setting. Take another photo with the iris opened one stop. Take another photo with the iris closed one stop from the original setting. The idea is to have one shot overexpoed and one shot underexposed just in case your original exposue was too light or too dark.

    Do not use a flash unless you have a really dark subject and you know the concept of "fill flash". [​IMG]

    This will give you shots of your products with the same background and should work nice in a catalog.

    Good luck.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2003
  3. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    wow thanks thhat is really helpful im gonne try it out !
     
  4. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    o yea, i had a q's , can i use a bedsheet instead of cardboard? i have some greyish looking bedsheets i wonder if that will be okay?
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    The grey bed sheet can be used as your backdrop but the white cardboard is used as a reflector to bounce the window light back onto your products. You can tape the cardboard on a pole lamp or back of a chair and move in towards your subject until it's just out of the camera frame.

    Also, If your subject is small and you have to zoom in to fill the frame, make sure you set your camera to a small aperture like f/16 or f/22 so you'll have enough "depth of field" to ensure a sharp picture. This will require that you use a slower shutter speed to compensate for the reduced light entering the lens.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
  6. redna

    redna New Member

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    Good info..
     
  7. bioyuki

    bioyuki Ich habe Angst

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    What jcolmon said...lots of fill light and try to use a north facing window. I personally like to use either a white background or black velvet.
     
  8. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I do too when I'm in the studio, but for someone not overly familar with proper exposure techniques, using a white or black background can lead to grossly over or under exposed photos.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
  9. bioyuki

    bioyuki Ich habe Angst

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    Thats what the spot meter is for :bigok:
     
  10. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Or the incident meter, which I prefer. Trouble is, I doubt court-jester has either.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
  11. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    i took em any one wanne see?
     
  12. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Sure. Post 'em. We want to see if you learned anything grasshopper. :big grin:

    Jim
     

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