A&P need some proofreading. V. bio/intro to a series.

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by jared_IRL, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    Help me out with this guys, I'm struggling. Book seeds to be sent out for print like yesterday.

     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2008
  2. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    ok. it's been edited down to this:


    care, goddam it.

    Just tell me if it's decent or something.
     
  3. kristin

    kristin my dog > *

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    I think it's good
     
  4. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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    As a child playing 'Cops & Robbers,' Jared always played the cop – not for moral reasons, but for the thrill of outsmarting bad guys and solving the impossible case. As Jared grew older, he developed an interest in detective stories, which eventually lead him to film and literature. Starting with Sherlock Holmes, Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, which then lead to hard boiled detective stories, Jared became ever more enthralled with the film noir movement.

    In this particular series, Jared has focused on the darkness and shadows that distinguish film noir as a genre of photography. These images are characterized by their purposeful use of light to highlight the photograph's subject and deep shadows that swallow up the remainder of the frame. This style is heavily influenced by film noir cinematography, including the use of period clothing, poses and emotions found throughout films of the genre.

    These images strive to evoke the nostalgia of the film noir movement that flourished from 1932 to 1955. During this period, Hollywood was exploring the dark side of society with films typically portraying murder, deceit, and a general tone of pessimism. These dark overtones, coupled with the sexual innuendo of the femme fatale, created a tension never before found in American cinematography. It is this tension that symbolized post-World War II America to the movie-growing public. *(movie-going public?)*

    This series of images has largely been influenced by films shot in the 1940's and their use of hard light and deep shadows to amplify emotional tension. This includes John Huston's 'The Maltese Falcon' and the work of Otto Preminger, Billy Wilder, and Fritz Lang. *(Redundant paragraph)*




    Looking good. I changed up a few things. :dunno:
     

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