A&P Need some Help guys.

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Supratt85, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. Supratt85

    Supratt85 New Member

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    Hey wassup, Im pretty new to this forum and kinda new to photography also, I just picked up the Digital Rebel not too long ago, and i took some time exposure shots at night. The problem im having is that the sky is turning out like an orangish color, I know that the lights around my area are orange, but is thier anyway to do a color correction either within the camera or in photoshop so that the sky turns out blacker? BTW heres some examples.

    [​IMG]

    The one on top was directly under a white light, but the sky still turned out orangish


    [​IMG]

    Thanx, any input is appreciated
     
  2. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    First of all the orange color is from the sodium vapor lights, like you thought. One word of caution, if you turn the sky too dark, you'll lose the contrast between your black car and the sky. If you want to change the color in the camera, try to do a white balance on an orange or yellow card. This should turn the sky towards the blue spectrum. Note that this will also change all the other colors in the shot as well. You can probably change the color easier in photoshop, but not being an PS expert, you're on your own there. Another trick you can do is get yourself a graduated ND (neutral density) filter. This is a filter that is grey on one side and fades to clear near the middle. I use one in video and film production for just about all my exterior shots. It darkens (but does not change the color) of the sky while leaving the foreground the correct exposure.

    The easiest option is to simply drive to a location that isn't lit by sodium vapor lights and shoot your time-exposure shots just after the sun goes down. You'll still have some light in the sky, but you'll also get the nice headlight/tailight streaking.

    Using your flash to fill in the side of the car is recommended as well. It looks like this is what you did in your first shot, albeit you were still a bit too far away for the flash to do much good. If your flash is removable, try a time exposure of about a minute, and take your flash and walk around the car, never stopping, flashing the car multiple times. This will "build up" the light on the car from several angles. As long as you don't stop, your body won't show up on the picture.
     
  3. Supratt85

    Supratt85 New Member

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    Hey thanks alot, im going to try and play around with the white balance stuff and if that doesnt work, ill try to pick up a nuetral density filter.
     
  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Bear in mind that a graduated neutral density filter won't change the color, it just darkens a portion of the shot. You will probably have to call Tiffen to find a graduated ND filter as they aren't usually sold in camera stores. They come in square or rectangle shapes and are designed to fit in a matte box which attaches to your lens. You don't have to buy a matte box as you can simply hold the filter in front of your lens.
     

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