MMA Need boxing/kickboxing help....

Discussion in 'OT Bar' started by Socrates, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. Socrates

    Socrates New Member

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    What is the best way to get used to staying in the pocket and trading blows?

    I have the habit of just backing up as soon as punches are thrown. I see a lot of fighters who can just sit there and block punches without backing up and counter. Or guys like BJ Penn who can just move forward constantly.

    I'm guessing the best way is just to keep sparring and try to make myself stay in the pocket, but I was hoping someone had some insight that maybe I haven't thought of.
     
  2. Kuet

    Kuet New Member

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    It is definitely a learned skill like you said, the more sparring you do will help- Im not as bad as i used to be but i used to go back on my heels and pretty much put myself right at the end of the strikes- not a good thing. Keep practicing- and you most likely like 98% of people blink when you are getting a combo thrown at you- even if they are light strikes- repetition is the key.

    Also, try looking at the guys chest/ body area, but try to see him as a whole and how/when they move...its a great feeling seeing progression and the best way to do that is keep sparring. Good luck.
     
  3. konrad109

    konrad109 New Member

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    BJ penn does it by sidestepping or slipping and then countering, and even then its a series of engagments and disengagements, you're never really supposed to stand infront of the guy and trade.

    Couple basics that I know that have helped me a lot:

    If a guy steps in to attack, step off to the side, not backwards. Don't back up cause then you'll just be at the end of his punches and he can follow you easily. If you cirlce off to the side and rotate back into him, you might find a counter shot, especially if he rushes too far forward. If you're both orthadox, you're better off stepping to your right because it makes it harder for him to power behind his shots untill he turns back into you.

    Practice the jab parry and high elbow block against the cross (the one where you kinda brush your fingers through your hair, popular in muay thai). Don't try to punch, just focus on your defense. Like Kuet said, its easier to see things coming if you look the guy in the chest instead of the eyes, plus it naturally lowers your chin. Just get comfortable with seeing the punches coming and blocking em. Eventually you start seeing counter opportunities. Once you get good at that you can try slipping.

    Keep a mind on the range too. Most people throw a punch as soon as they are in range. So, if the guy steps in, expect a punch. If you want him to punch so you can counter, you step in. Stay outside his range untill you are ready to do whatever you need to do. Always take small steps so that you are always ready to throw a punch back or block. Never try to imitate Chuck Liddell: Keep your chin low and hands up obviously. When you throw a punch keep your shoulders high so that if he tries a counter they will provide meat shields.
     
  4. 2ofdem

    2ofdem OT Supporter

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    Its definately a learned thing your natural reaction to someone throwing a punch is to back away. Learn to slip punches good head movement is key look for head movement drills. Drill it and then spar as drills only teach you the movements sparring actually puts it into context as its a protective mechanism you need to put it under real stress.
     
  5. Kuet

    Kuet New Member

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    perfect.

    Ive seen quite a few guys being stars hitting the pads/heavy bag but dont get enough sparring time in; they get in the ring and you wonder what happened.
     

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