N02 and Synephrine

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Sylva, Jul 13, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Sylva

    Sylva New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,974
    Likes Received:
    0
    On last saturday I started using an No2 product(Fizogen Blitz Cycle), At the same time i started using a fat loss product containing synephrine. I have been having great luck while on both(so far) but yesterday while at the gym my workout partener said he "thought" they the N02 and Lipo6(the product containing synephrine) were working agsiant each other in some aspects b/c the No2 expands the blood pathways and he "thought" that synephrine constricts them, hence why they warn ppl with high bp to consult a doc. before taking any fat loss supplement.

    And while I have quite a bit of workout/nutrition knowledge, im honestly just not sure if thats true. Hopefully someone hear can shed a little light on this for me.

    Thanks

    Sylva
     
  2. pt

    pt New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2002
    Messages:
    8,611
    Likes Received:
    0
    1) Fizogen products = RIPOFF

    2) Save the Synepherine for a cutting phase

    3) Save the Nitric Oxide precursors for a bulking phase
     
  3. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    don't buy NO2
     
  4. Sylva

    Sylva New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,974
    Likes Received:
    0
    Fizogen is a ripoff if you have to pay more than a 1/4 of the msrp. Luckily i dont...;)

    Thanks for the insight...I also found this after a bit of searching today...Synephrine is the main "active" compound found in the fruit of a plant called Citrus aurantium. The fruit is also known as zhi shi (in traditional Chinese medicine), and as green orange, sour orange and bitter orange in other parts of the world. Synephrine is chemically very similar to the ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine found in many OTC cold/allergy medications and in a number of weight loss and energy supplements which contain Ma Huang. But synephrine differs from ephedrine in that synephrine is considered a semi-selective sympathomimetic (because it targets some tissues such as fat, more than it targets others such as the heart) versus a non-selective sympathomimetic (like ephedra which targets many tissues equally and thus often causes side effects). For example, although some high-dose ephedra-containing supplements have been associated with certain cardiovascular side effects as elevated blood pressure and heart palpitations, researchers at Mercer University in Atlanta have shown that Citrus aurantium extract (because it targets fat tissue rather than heart tissue) has no effect on hemodynamics such as heart rate and blood pressure.

    And thats kind of the answer i was looking for...
     
  5. Sylva

    Sylva New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,974
    Likes Received:
    0
    Could you give me a little insight on to why you think that. I am always wanting to hear others thoughts and opinions. Some of my work out partners have had great success with no2 so i thought i would give it a shot.

    Sylva
     
  6. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    The only thing nitric oxide does is promote hyoptension (low blood pressure which is unhealthy) in healthy adults. If you take it long enough it, like some morons who swear by it, it will eventually cause brain toxicity. A "body boner" is really worth it, huh?

    Read the Real Science
    1. Nathan C. Nitric oxide as a secretory product of mammalian cells. FASEB J 1992 6(12):3051-64.

    2. Mayer B; Hemmens B. Biosynthesis and action of nitric oxide in mammalian cells. Trends Biochem Sci 1997 22(12):477-81.

    3. Janabi N; Chabrier S; Tardieu M. Endogenous nitric oxide activates prostaglandin F2 alpha production in human microglial cells but not in astrocytes: a study of interactions between eicosanoids, nitric oxide, and superoxide anion (O2-) regulatory pathways. J Immunol 1996 1;157(5):2129-35.

    4. Esposito C; Cozzolino A; Porta R; Mariniello L; Buommino E; Morelli F; Metafora V; Metafora S. Protein SV-IV promotes nitric oxide production not associated with apoptosis in murine macrophages. Eur J Cell Biol 2002 81(4):185-96.

    5. Eckmann L; Laurent F; Langford TD; Hetsko ML; Smith JR; Kagnoff MF; Gillin FD. Nitric oxide production by human intestinal epithelial cells and competition for arginine as potential determinants of host defense against the lumen-dwelling pathogen Giardia lamblia. J Immunol 2000 1;164(3):1478-87.

    6. Kelly RA; Smith TW. Nitric oxide and nitrovasodilators: similarities, differences, and interactions. Am J Cardiol 1996 30;77(13):2C-7C.

    - http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showpost.php?p=6324375&postcount=7

    Nitric Oxide Hemodilators

    Nitric oxide supplements are the hottest thing on the market. Athletes are buying them in droves without knowing exactly what is happening in the body. Supplement companies claim to educate their consumers with pamphlets and informational websites, but these only offer an incomplete story of what is actually happening. Manufacturers state that nitric oxide supplements, via the compound arginine alpha-ketoglutarate, gives the athlete added energy, mental focus, workout intensity, perpetual pump and muscle growth. Upon closer investigation, these effects are largely exaggerated and in some cases completely fallacious. While arginine is involved in the regulation of growth hormone release, the supplemental dosages that would stimulate a noticeable effect are astronomical. Arginine is also a substrate for nitric oxide; an effect that is enhanced when combined with alpha-ketoglutarate. Nitric oxide is released by the walls of the blood vessels that cause a decrease in the resistance and an increase in blood flow to the skeletal muscles. Arginine may also stimulate the release of epinephrine from the adrenal gland. These two effects are mostly beneficial to endurance athletes, not strength athletes like the manufacturers suggest. Grasemann et al. (2005) determined that participants receiving as little as 200 mg of L-arginine showed a significant increase in nitric oxide formation, as well as significant increases in plasma L-arginine and sputum L-arginine. This indicates that L-arginine supplementation does indeed induce nitric oxide formation. Rytlewski et al. (2005) found that three weeks of L-arginine supplementation lead to significant drops in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arteriole pressure while elevating urinary excretion of NOx (nitrates) and mean plasma levels of l-citrulline. However, plasma L-arginine levels were not effected even with 300 mg of supplementation. Thusfar it has been established that L-arginine supplementation does indeed stimulate nitric oxide synthesis. Now it must be addressed whether or not this is beneficial to athletes.

    Paddon-Jones et al. (2004) found that nitric oxide supplementation does not provide an ergogenic effect to healthy individuals. Miguez et al. (2004) found that 4 weeks of L-arginine supplementation increased serum triglyceride levels and significantly increased levels of low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol. This is obviously cause for concern and needs to be further investigated. Evans et al. (2004) sought to find the optimal dosage of L-arginine to elicit the greatest effect on nitric oxide synthesis. Manufacturers recommend upwards of 6000-10000 mg/day but many athletes report taking even higher dosages as much as 35000 mg/day, nearly six times the recommended intake. Evans (2004) found that half the participants supplementing with 20000 mg/day reported serious adverse side effects from L-arginine supplementation and over half of the participants reported severe side effects when taking more than 20000 mg/day. A significant portion of individuals supplementing with 9000 mg/day reported adverse effects, and over the duration of the supplementation period, no participants experienced any sort of weight gain. Chu et al. (2004) found that L-arginine supplementation impaired pulmonary endothelium-dependent relaxation of vascular tissue. This may lead to potentially dangerous vascular spasms and cardiovascular abnormalities.

    It has been found that L-arginine keto-gluterate supplementation stimulates rapid vasidilation in a non-discriminatory fashion. Significant vasodilatation causes a drop in blood pressure (because as the veins widen, the pressure drops). Baroreceptors in the aortic arch and in the carotid sinus will detect this fast, significant drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. During exercise, it is imperative that diastolic blood pressure remain constant. It is natural for systolic blood pressure to rise during the onset of exercise, but diastolic blood pressure values must remain constant. A drop in either during exercise is cause for great concern and can lead to serious cardiovascular damage. In order to protect the body from going into shock, vasomotor centers in the medulla will cause the blood vessels leading to the brain to constrict in order to increase blood pressure going into the brain (too much blood can severely damage the brain, just like too little). This is a dangerous sequence that can potentially lead to a vascular catastrophe.

    Based on the available research, this author strongly recommends that athletes avoid nitric oxide and hemodilator supplements in the interest of safety. Moreover, it has been suggested that these supplements have little or no anabolic or ergogenic benefits for the athlete.

    http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/suppanalysis.php

    http://www.bodybuilding.net/showthread.php?t=549


    research > you
     
  7. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    oh... and I thought I'd just throw this out there


    [​IMG]
     
  8. Sylva

    Sylva New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,974
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for posting the No2 info I am now considering some other alternatives, btw i will no longer be signing my post...thanks for the heads up, I lmao when i saw that. Other people at work wonder wtf im doing...
     
  9. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954

    :rofl::rofl: welcome to OT
     
  10. onedownfiveup

    onedownfiveup Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2005
    Messages:
    18,222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    KC
    I heard him laughing saying Oh Em Gee.

    I know so many people I can post that image to on other forums. :mamoru:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page