My experience with pain and what it has taught me....

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by -Mordecai-, Dec 8, 2006.

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  1. -Mordecai-

    -Mordecai- New Member

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    I was just browsing F&N earlier, lurking as usual. When I came across the Henry Rollins article for the first time. I've always thought Rollins was awesome but after reading that article I think he is a God among men. It got me thinking about some shit that has happened to me over the years and then as if by fate I was walking down the stairs about 10 mins later to go to the gym and I hit the top of my hand on a corner of the stairway rail. I didn't hit it hard at all but I hit it in the exact right spot where there is a pressure point or open nerve in the top of your hand (between the 2 middle tendons, for me atleast). Almost immediately pain starts shooting across my hand, into my finger tips and even all the way down my arm.

    As I said I was on my way out for the gym and after this happened I stopped and actually had second thoughts about going to the gym. I could hardly open the lid to my protein jug. How would I be able to grip a barbell? Then I thought about what I had just read in the Rollins article and about some other shit. The pain in my hand was not physical. I didn't tear a tendon or break a bone. I pinched a nerve. It was all in my mind.

    I took a second and thought about how I had learned to deal with pain like this in the past.

    It has been almost 3 years since my last "episode". I used to have this disorder of cranial nerve behind my left eye. Trigeminal Neuralgia. I don't know if any of you have ever heard of it so I copied a definition from a site dedicated to it:

    "TN (Trigeminal Neuralgia) is a pain that is described as among the most acute known to mankind. TN produces excruciating, lightning strikes of facial pain, typically near the nose, lips, eyes or ears. It is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve, which is the fifth and largest cranial nerve. TN (Trigeminal Neuralgia / tic douloureux) is a disorder of the fifth cranial (trigeminal) nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed - lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, upper jaw, and lower jaw. By many, it's called the "suicide disease". A less common form of the disorder called "Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia" may cause less intense, constant, dull burning or aching pain, sometimes with occasional electric shock-like stabs. Both forms of the disorder most often affect one side of the face, but some patients experience pain at different times on both sides. Onset of symptoms occurs most often after age 50, but cases are known in children and even infants. Something as simple and routine as brushing the teeth, putting on makeup or even a slight breeze can trigger an attack, resulting in sheer agony for the individual. Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is not fatal, but it is universally considered to be the most painful affliction known to medical practice. "

    It's a pretty rare disorder affecting something like 1 in a million or 1 in 100,000 people. But I can tell you from experience that those statements don't lie. It hurts. BAD. I'd wake up in the morning to the feeling like someone was jabbing and ice pik into the side of my face over and over again. It would last for maybe an hour or 2. It was completely immobilizing. I'd curl up into a ball in a dark corner of the room and wait it out. The reason they call it the suicide disease is because most people that develop it end up commiting suicide within a year or 2. And to tell you the truth, I don't blame them. I thought about it several times and I had this for only about 3 to 4 months.

    But I guess you could say I'm one of the lucky ones (or unlucky, depending on how you look at it) because I'm better now. Hopefully for the rest of my life.

    Back to me hitting my hand on the railing. Its kind of funny how something like this could have such a profound effect on you but it reminded me of something that I told myself a long time ago. That I will never feel any pain that is worse than what I went through with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    I guess the point I'm trying to make is that pain is in your mind. After thinking about my experiences with Trigeminal Neuralgia today the pain in my hand all but disappeared. I took the thought of the pain out of my mind and went to the gym and had a phenomenal workout.

    P.S. I don't know who's quote this is but I find it fitting "Pain is weakness leaving the body"

     
  2. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    IBrailroadspikethroughbicep
     
  3. cavefish

    cavefish You ain't a crook son, you just a shook one

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    Holy goddamn that condition sounds like a nightmare.
     
  4. jessb20hatch

    jessb20hatch Let's bang like Myosin & Actin

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    yes i agree that pain tolerance is very much psychological...but pain does sure a purpose...to stop harm that could cause more injury. I remember when I was about 6-7 and I asked my parents as I'm sitting there pinching myself...what really is pain??
     
  5. Layne Staley

    Layne Staley New Member

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    I am yet to see that disorder in my practice...and I hope I never do.
     
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