Mup.sys

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Clarity, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    My computer is fairly good, but it takes mucher longer than my old computer to boot in Windows. My computer loads the various files very fast, and hits a wall on Mup.sys. It hangs there for quite a while, 20+ seconds, causing the slow boot-up. I googled this online, and in every case, Mup.sys, or what's after it, caused their system to restart. However, my computer just boots up slowly.

    Something in relation to this, is that when I install Windows, it is not able to copy contents from the i386 folder on the CD. I've fixed this by creating a second partition, and copying the i386 folder. This fixed the problem, I just type the address of the i386 directory in the error dialog. This is not a problem, but just an interesting phenomenon that I can't explain. Perhaps it has something to do with the Mup.sys fiasco.
     
  2. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I believe that Mup.sys is the last kernel component loaded before the hardware drivers get loaded. 99% of the time a slow bootup is caused by a bad driver or faulty hardware, and I'd say you fall safely inside that 99% envelope.

    It sounds like the problem with the \i386 folder is an installation disc that's going bad. By the way, you don't need to create a separate partition -- you could copy those files to C:\i386 just as effectively, and then you wouldn't have to delete the spare partition and resize the main partition.
     
  3. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    I do frequent reformats. The i386 folder lies within a large data partition, where I store my music, work files, etc. It's not just the CD, I borrowed a friend's Windows disc with no Service Packs, and it also had the same error.

    More research on the internet found out that most of the time, the slow bootup, or bootup hangs are due to PCI cards. I can only think of my X-Fi Platinum, and hit my head. This sound card was impossibly hard to get to work with Windows, and has yet to have LInux support.

    I think I will chalk this slow bootup into the catagory of items I can't fix, just like my Windows installation i386 troubles.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Oh. You're one of those people -- the ones who reformat every couple of months instead of maintaining their system properly.

    I've been running the same installation of XP since almost the day XP was released to the public -- it's been through four motherboards, three chipsets, two brands of CPU, three video cards, installation of Service Packs 1 and 2, migration from an IDE drive to an SATA RAID, and god-knows-how-many program installations and uninstallations -- and it takes less time to boot up now than it did when I installed it, thanks to the faster parts it's running on now.

    All I do to maintain it is:

    - Restrict the Recycle Bin and System Restore to using 5% of the disk space each;
    - Run a Disk Cleanup, not including compressing old files, once every two weeks;
    - Run Norton Speed Disk once a month;
    - Run a scan/repair with ChkDsk twice a year;
    - Run Norton WinDoctor and manually repair any broken Registry entries whenever I happen to remember to do it;
    - Dig through the stuff on my hard drive and delete old garbage from time to time.

    It's not any harder to maintain a computer than it is to maintain a car. It just requires a schedule.
     
  5. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Wait, you realize he wants to make his system faster, right? Recommending Norton anything will usually do the exact opposite.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Not if it isn't running constantly, genius. I didn't say he should install Norton Anti-Productivity Suite, I said he should defrag more often, and I recommended Norton Speed Disk because it's more thorough than Windows Defrag is. Now, if I'd recommended DisKeeper, which DOES run constantly, THEN you'd be justified in busting my ass.
     
  7. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Problem is, unless you "acquire" it outside the normal channels, you can't unbundle most Norton products these days (unless you buy the business editions which cost more). Not to mention that unless you have a slow laptop drive defragging does about jack squat for increasing system performance. Caching and VDG pretty much eliminate any performance hits from fragmented files, not to mention that very very few home systems are anywhere close to disk bound to begin with.

    Even if you DID want to defrag, there are better choices than Norton (OoO and AusLogics make good defrag programs. AusLogic's is fast and free).

    Registry cleaners are unnecessary garbage. They are much more likely cause problems than fix them.
     
  8. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    Yes, I used to have various "disk-cleanup" and "registry cleanup/repair" tools. I found out through benchmarks and game performance that they did very little to help boost my performance. I used to have anti-virus programs and firewalls (no, I never used McAfee or Norton junk, mainly AVG, and sometimes NOD32) and now I don't.

    I still reformat a lot, because I am too lazy to try and setup a VMWare. I always install different programs, and am constantly playing with overclocking and it's different programs. I think the main point where I reformat is when I have 7+ programs I should uninstall, some new "tweaked" driver I want to try out (but distrust driver cleaner as a through solution to replacing drivers), and don't think a mere uninstall would work. Even if I manually searched the registry and harddrive, it feels as if there are some parts of the program left over (and there are, history links, etc.).

    Now that I actually think more about it, I could probably slow the frequency of my reformats.

    Either way, I'm still sad because of my window's boot speed :wtc:
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    1. I have a 3-Raptor RAID in my computer and the PCMark HDD score went from 5200 to 5700 after I defragged it. I dunno about you, but given that HDDs aren't getting any faster these days, I'll be glad to take even a temporary 10% speed boost. (The RAID is about 40% full, for the record.)

    2. Almost every home computer I've ever serviced for anyone has been disk-bound, or close to it, partly because of wasted space inside partially-used disk sectors storing tiny fragments of much larger files.

    3. I've never damaged a computer using Norton WinDoctor, and I've sped up several machines that had hundreds of garbage or mis-directed Registry entries in them. The difference is that I don't run the cleaner in automatic mode.

    I'll have to take a look at AusLogic's offering, I've never heard of them before. At any rate, though, I don't care if the defrag program is fast, I care if it's thorough. A lot of programs won't defrag large files with 2 or 3 fragments, because the marginal gain is so small, yet I prefer for it do be done anyway.
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    You too can benefit from Symantec GoBack. You can install whatever new programs and/or drivers you want, and if you don't like them, you can roll back absolutely every single byte that got changed on your hard drive -- even if Windows won't boot. (Far better than System Restore, though it will also wipe out documents and whatnot that got saved after the selected GoBack point.) I have it on the workstations I manage and I love it, it's saved my ass from having to reformat many times now.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2007
  11. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Again, vast majority of home machines are not disk bound so they are not being utilized to 100% anyway.

    Disk Bound != Disk utilization. Disk bound means a machine is thrashing the disk and the system is queuing disk I/O operations.
    Again, I doubt you actually got any real benefit. It's not a system reads every single registry entry every time it needs something, and size really does not matter. I manage multi-user systems that have registry sizes in excess of 128 megs and it has zero effect on the end user experience.

    We also don't defrag them, even though they can have disk I/O requirements over 500% higher than workstations running the same apps. Why? Because it does nothing but chew up resources that are better spent on user processes.
    Well wasting your drive's time really doesn't cost you anything (other than eating into the MTBF) but the only gain you get is psychosomatic.
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    My mistake on the terminology. In any event, I still disagree that most machines aren't bottlenecked by their hard drives, but we could argue over what color the sky is right now and get about as much accomplished. I'll leave it at this: I firmly maintain that any computer system will benefit from regular defragmentation, unless it's got a CPU bottleneck so severe that even the simplest operations take a noticeable amount of time.

    Why? Because, while your attitude is correct with respect to servers, whose performance under a steady high load is best measured using statistics instead of incidents, home PCs regularly see usage spikes that cause them to bog down. An Oracle database might not bitch too much about having to wait a couple of extra seconds for a queue of a few thousand data requests to be fulfilled, but Joe User tends to get pissed off when he has to wait, so there is a real benefit from improving a home PC's HDD response time under full load, even if that only happens during bootup.

    Disregarding any other "aesthetic" or "convenience" benefits, regular defragmentation also serves the purpose of eliminating emergent errors in the data. Hard drives are at their physical capacity limits nowadays -- hence the development of perpendicular recording and whatnot, in an attempt to reduce superparamagnetic corruption -- and as such, bits are at greater risk of flipping from 0 to 1 and vice versa the longer they sit in one place. Defragmentation requires reading data from one spot on the disk platter, running it through the HDD's built-in error checker, and recording it to another spot on the disk platter. This serves to take bits that are drifting dangerously close to ambiguity and restore them to a fresh 0 or 1 state. That is a good thing for data longevity.

    - - -

    I've had machines that have increased their benchmark performance after running WinDoctor, but those machines had a large number of broken file references in the Registry. I know perfectly well that (effectively) deleting text from the Registry isn't going to reduce its size or its response time by very much, but drivers and applications tend to run faster and crash less when the Registry stops telling them to look for DLL files in the wrong places.

    - - -

    Psychosomatism is subconsciously acting in a manner that causes imagined effects to be physically manifested. If that were the case, then regardless of whether I'm somehow willing my computer to work faster, or whather cleaning the Registry really is helping, my computer nonetheless works faster. I think what you meant to say was that defragging my computer has a placebo effect, though I've already mentioned that I saw actual benchmark improvements. And besides, defragging my hard drive while I'm at work, or defragging my office's servers at 3am on Sunday morning, doesn't waste anybody's or anything's time because nobody is doing anything with the computers anyway.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2007
  13. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    I just got AusLogics' free defragmenter. I'm going to install it if I install a lot of programs again, I just have FF right now =/

    deusexaethera - thanks for the tip, I will try out GoBack
     

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