multiple router network

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by daviid, Dec 25, 2006.

  1. daviid

    daviid cell tower tech

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    is there anyway to set it up so everything on the wireless router can see everything on the wired router and vice versa. im not sure if it matters or not but the only way i could get the wired comps to work is to set the wireless to 192.168.1.xxx and the wired to 10.0.0.xxx

    the way my network at home is
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

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    You need to set a DHCP range for both the wireless and the wired. Otherwise there will be clients on each router that will attempt to lease the same IP.

    So on the wireless, use 192.168.1.2-30 and on the wired, use 192.168.1.31-60 or something along those lines.


    Or, you can turn off DHCP all together on one router and have it lease IPs from just the other one. :dunno: In essence your wired router could just become a switch at that point.
     
  3. DaIceMan

    DaIceMan Jack Bauer > *.*

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    I'm doing the same thing today. I have my DSL feeing my wired router and I need to set up my wireless router to run the Wii, DS and my daughters' laptop off of.

    Need to do it quickly so I can play Super Mario Brothers on the Wii after dinner tonight.
     
  4. peterthesmart

    peterthesmart New Member

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    You can force a router to function as a switch by using the LAN port for an uplink on one of them. If you do this, then don't use the WAN port on the router that you're forcing to act as a switch.
     
  5. mooboy

    mooboy OT Supporter

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    If your wireless router supports Wireless Access Point mode, it would function as a network bridge. Allowing wireless devices to grab dhcp leases from the wired router instead.

    Cable Mode -> Wired Router -> to various wired devices ->Wireless Router (in bridge mode) -> to wireless devices
     
  6. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    To combine what some people have already said: Unplug the WRT54G from the wired Linksys WAN port and plug it into one of the LAN ports. If you are out of ports, ditch the wired linksys (you don't need it anyway) and just get a cheap switch with enough ports to cover your needs. Turn off DHCP on the wired router and let them pull from the wireless router.
     
  7. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    Some of those Wireless access points have just a [Access Point] mode you can turn on as well. Then it just acts as a bridge, not a router. At the end of the day, you just don't want that thing to NAT, or hand out DHCP addresses.
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Considering his internet connection is also connected to the wireless router, you guys might want to mention moving it to the wired router if he is going to turn that one into an AP. Would be bad otherwise.
     
  9. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    good call, i guess i really don't understand wtf he is trying to do here
     

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