GUN More firepower? Some local cops say it's time to upgrade

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  1. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    http://www.ksn.com/news/local/7126406.html

    WICHITA, Kansas, April 20, 2007 – It can happen in just a matter of minutes, and for law enforcement, it is a major challenge.

    Shooters like Cho Seung-Hui are what cops call "active shooters," meaning they're killing at the same time police are trying to control the situation.

    "Active shooters because of the urgency of what's going on at the time, really requires small groups, small units to enter and engage that particular target and eliminate it," Maj. Jackie Stuart, Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office, said.

    But to send officers into a danger zone, they need fire power.

    "We needed a weapon that not only had range, but the ability to fire multiple rounds," Stuart said.

    So the Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office is adding this carbine rifle to their arsenal, a direct response to scenarios that have played out across the country.

    Sedgwick County isn't alone. The Reno County Sheriff and Hutchinson Police have also added rifles after a police chase that left them feeling short of firepower. A complement tot heir handgun and shotguns officers already carry.

    While departments across Kansas are adding rifles to their arsenals, one department that has yet to do that is right here in Wichita. We asked Wichita Police why they don't carry rifles, and they declined our request for an on-camera interview. However, they issued this statement:

    "The Wichita Police Department continually trains and equips its officers to respond to active-shooter situations. The training received by our officers, and the equipment and resources available to them are among the finest in the country."

    Elsewhere, Oklahoma City falls in line with Wichita, using shot guns. Johnson County, on the other hand, has switched to rifles.

    "It's an incredibly active weapon and can be used in so many ways," Stuart said.

    And in today's world, "many ways" to fight crime gives some deputies peace of mind.
     

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