MMA MMA A Parents Questions

Discussion in 'OT Bar' started by woodchuck, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. woodchuck

    woodchuck Member

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    Ok so I"ll admit to only being a MMA fan for the last year or so. I saw UFC just after basic training ten years ago, but that's when it was truly a blood sport.

    So I was watching UFC unleashed last night, and it dawned on me that fighting in the octagon is extremely similar to a school yard fight. There are basically three ways to win.

    1: Punch them untill someone intervenes, or they fall down.
    2: Pin them untill they say "uncle" (or tap)
    3: Scramble around on the ground and punch them untill someone intervenes.

    Now I have three small...very small children The oldest is 6. And a lot of her friends are doing karate and TKD. Bullies and school conflict are going to become present in the next few years, and I want my kids prepared. So last night I was thinking that these kids that are taking these classes, are benefiting from being away from the TV and confidence gains, but are there any other gains?

    I looked online.

    Las Vegas Combat Club (Frank Mir anyone)
    Master Toddy's MT school (Marvin Eastman)
    Cobra Kai JuiJitsu (Joe Stevenson)
    and out side of Vegas
    Team Quest all offer kids classes.

    I had no idea. Obviously I knew that MT and BJJ would be preferable, but I was literally clueless that I could take my kids to the same places the pros train. I thought that you trained at some other place, and only the pros or soon to be pros were training in the places I listed above.

    Obviously I just learned another hard truth of the McDojo that most MMA folks have known for a while, but still I was impressed. So I made the decision to take my kids to BJJ if they ever asked to do a martial art. That's where the questions came up.

    Do you think that kids in particular need to go to classes that use a gi?
    Not for technique, but because they associate the gi with knowin their stuff.
    They take pride in their belts and such. Obviously I would rather take my kids to a MMA school like LVCC where they roll twice a week, and kickbox twice a week. But I dunno if the kids would be into it without belts and patches and stuff.

    Any of you have kids? Do you let them watch UFC? Do they train?

    Ricardo Calvacanti was trained by Carlson Gracie, he teaches kids exclusivly here in town, and Reylson Gracie here takes kids too. Maybe that's a better mix.

    So if you have or hypothetically if you had kids, how would you start them?

    Traditional bjj? MMA? MT? TKD? I'm leaning towards traditional bjj. They do tourneys, get belts and stuff like that. Ok so that was less questions and more ramblings of a father. Any comments?


    CLIFFS: If you don't like to read, why are you on a message board?
     
  2. Placebo

    Placebo New Member

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    Where I train there are a lot of kids that are doing BJJ traditionally. In my personal opinion anything is good whether it be TKD or whatever just get him involved and make sure it's not a complete McDojo.
     
  3. woodchuck

    woodchuck Member

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    Ok so here's some questions for you.

    Are any of the kids disappointed that they won't be doing side kicks and breaking boards?

    Do they genuinly enjoy rolling?

    What would you consider not a "complete" McDojo? Routine sparring? Competition?
     
  4. brolli

    brolli OT Supporter

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    For kids, I would say that getting them started in bjj and mt early on is a good idea (much much better than having them doing forms and skip kicking for points) but also at such a young age I would say physical appearance would have much to do with "bullying". I mean lets me realistic, most playground bullies only bully other kids because he is bigger/fatter and assertive. If avoiding that is all you are concerned about, I suggest feeding your kids well and have them learn to not be passive. And then if they still get pushed around, sure have them use bjj.
     
  5. d0nk3ypunch

    d0nk3ypunch New Member

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    We have some younger kids where I train, they seem to be cool with the lack of belts.

    If that's really an issue, I think judo is your best bet, a good judo club will teach them a lot that can be used in a real life situation.

    As far as letting kids watch MMA, I would have no problem with that once I actually have kids. I think watching two grown mean beat the snot out of eachother and then hug afterwards is a good lesson in sportsmanship.
     
  6. Rommel

    Rommel friends forever

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    I'd say start them in wrestling and judo early, then when they're twelve or so you can introduce bjj and boxing.
     
  7. chechen

    chechen Brazilian Jiu Jitsu OT Supporter

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    BJJ or wrestling would be good for a kid to train in. I dont know if theyd like that more than breaking boards. it really depends on the kid. but ive seen lots of kids in bjj look like theyre enjoying it.
     
  8. Rommel

    Rommel friends forever

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    I actually think karate is ok for kids and alot of the tma's do tend to teach things that kids should learn e.g. self respect, self control, control etc

    that's unless you want your kid being a badass bone breaker

    If i were you i would go and check out each environment before placing your kid in in, to see if what they teach and when i say this i don't just mean technique, i mean things like respect, self control etc that will shape your childs character as he grows up.
     
  9. chechen

    chechen Brazilian Jiu Jitsu OT Supporter

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    everytime i go to the kids class, my bjj instructor is giving them speeches about working hard.. etc etc.

    maybe not as much discipline is being learned by making the kids yell out, YES SIR, like in TKD though. It depends how old his kids are. if theyre 5 years old, theyre not going to be learning a whole ton either way. if theyre 10 or 11, I think theyre better off learning something useful.
     
  10. Rommel

    Rommel friends forever

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    I think once they hit 10-12 they should as you say move onto something useful but i think it's important that the kid doesn't become a bully or use his skills to cause harm. The last thing you want is to find out your kid has just choked another kid to sleep in a playground fight over sandwhiches.

    But alas i think the best sports for starters are judo and wrestling, as they are heavily regulated, have insurance, regular competition for kids and have many programs and initiatives for kids and their development. Your kid could be a takedown machine, introduce bjj and you have a winning grappler when they are mature enough to understand and take responsibility for submissions and the damage they can cause.
     
  11. brolli

    brolli OT Supporter

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    the problem with the kids screaming yes sir to the instructors in tkd is that when they get their black belts (which is a couple years) they feel like they deserve the same amount of respect from their peers who are lower belts. They also walk around with huge egos acting as if they could destroy anybody if they wanted to. That in my opinion is not something I would want my kid to be like.
     
  12. d0nk3ypunch

    d0nk3ypunch New Member

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    When I was in the 7th grade I took TKD... a classmate of mine was a blackbelt at the same school. Had exactly the same attitude you described.
     
  13. brolli

    brolli OT Supporter

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    My freshman year, I lived down the hall from this tkd black belt. Every time we spoke, it would ALWAYS fucking lead to him telling me of his "street fights" in the past. And they always involved him vs 3+ guys. :rolleyes: Needless to say, I stopped talking to him very quickly. I am almost certain he still does it, and will probably get beaten up pretty bad by someone who doesn't believe him.
     
  14. Placebo

    Placebo New Member

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    Hid oldest is six that's why I said even TKD would be good. TKD is geared towards very young kids IMO anyway.
     
  15. Jonzun

    Jonzun New Member

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    In my experience any kids that train can have that attitude but some dont. It just depends on the kid. For example we have a 12 year old that just got his black belt but he is the most respectful and humble kid I know.
     
  16. B4LL

    B4LL OT Supporter

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    wow.. that's pretty sweeeeet. at my place there's a class for little kids.. watching the little ones throw each other is pretty :coold:
     
  17. brolli

    brolli OT Supporter

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    I actually found out that my instructor teaches little kids at his academy too (under 9 yrs old). He leaves out the more dangerous techniques to keep it safe.
     
  18. woodchuck

    woodchuck Member

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    We are allready involved in Soccer, and gymnastics, and Scouting, and Church stuff. I'm not worried about my kids needing an outlet.

    My questions were mostly hypothetical for the day when I get hit up for karate lessons.

    As far as I can tell you guys are all pretty well in agreement that;

    Under 10 Go for something with belts and gis and competition.

    Over 10 make sure that it's something with practical application as well.

    I gotta say it's nice to see you guys all more concerned with the kids as people first. I was honestly expecting someone to be trying to say I needed my kids in MT as soon as possible so that I'd have the next UFC megastar on my hands.
     
  19. Intellex

    Intellex Dogs love me cause I'm crazy sniffable OT Supporter

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    I'll chime in with the necessity of MT. Although I think BJJ is the key, I think striking and coordination are keys that come into play way before BJJ.
     
  20. Maestro Nobones

    Maestro Nobones Great Job! - GLAD DADS CREW

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    junior high wrestling
     
  21. Supertrapped

    Supertrapped President of 2:73

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    You sir, are correct
     
  22. Titus

    Titus New Member

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    i'd go with wrestling/judo at a young age. they are practical and when he gets to jr high/high school he will have an upperhand if he chooses to wrestle for his school.
     

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