Mercury in Tuna

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by igo4bmx, May 23, 2007.

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  1. igo4bmx

    igo4bmx WHAT WHAT WHAT THE FU OT Supporter

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    Has anyone worried about the affects of taking in so much tuna?

    I used to eat tuna 2-3 times a day, and I stopped because of this. I had trouble thinking way back when I used to eat this all the time.
     
  2. PurEvl

    PurEvl going out gassed and not half assed...

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    at my peak it was 6 cans a day...been tested 3 times in 8 years...Dr laughs everytime. Nothing ever shows. I use bumblebee white solid in water only.
     
  3. tryfuhl

    tryfuhl New Member

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    I eat a fuckload of tuna. The only issue I've ever had is that when it's really hot, this red shade starts to creep up from my feet to some undetermined level.
     
  4. xela

    xela So say we all!

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    I'm not really concerned.
     
  5. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

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    I guess it depends who you ask.

    These jokers are telling me I can eat 3 cans a week:
    http://www.ewg.org/issues/mercury/20031209/calculator.php?lbs=200&sex=male\

    These hippies say 1 can every 3 days.......
    http://www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/tuna.asp?gclid=CLqTsZK9pIwCFQJUZQodLhu-6g


    The Canadians weigh in:
    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/02/19/tuna-testing.html

    The EPA:
    http://www.epa.gov/waterscience/fishadvice/advice.html#tuna

    More hippies. They say that eating 72 oz of canned light tuna per week as a 200 pound person gives you about 380% of your FDA suggested intake of mercury.....:
    http://www.gotmercury.org/

    Good article:
    http://www.sj-r.com/sections/news/stories/114919.asp

    All of the warnings I have seen are related to women and children. So I ignore them. One alternative might be to switch to canned salmon, which has an undetectable amount of mercury. Anyone tried canned salmon?
     
  6. jokka

    jokka OT Supporter

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    tuna + sasame oil = greatest flavor
     
  7. Plan B

    Plan B New Member

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    Fuck yeah, I love it. But I'm weird :dunno:
     
  8. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    :rofl:
     
  9. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    last year after i had my jaw wired shut I ate a lot of tuna along with other shit when i was trying to bulk up from AIDS patient to skinnyfat nerd size.... I went and got my cholesterol tested and asked them to check for mercury in my blood or anything that would be affected by it.. There was nothing. I'd say I only ate a can per day though.
     
  10. Drewski

    Drewski New Member

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  11. MP18

    MP18 New Member

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  12. JeremyD

    JeremyD New Member

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    Absolutely zero reason to worry.
     
  13. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

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    Bumping the "Death by Tuna" thread for more evidence of its harmlessness.

    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1706623,00.html

    Thursday, Jan. 24, 2008
    The Danger of Not Eating Tuna

    By Sora Song


    In recent years, the last word on the dangers of eating mercury-rich fish seemed to be the government's well-publicized 2004 advisory, which warned against eating higher mercury fish like white tuna, but applied only to pregnant or nursing women, women of childbearing age and young children. While mercury overload could damage the still-developing nervous system of a baby, the scientific consensus was that for the average Joe taking in the average amount of fish, heavy with metals or not, it posed no undue threat.
    But yesterday a New York Times investigation of local restaurants and groceries found that tender slices of tuna sushi being served up all over the city were "tainted" with exceedingly high levels of mercury — so high that eating just six pieces a week would send the average-weight adult over the EPA's acceptable weekly level of mercury intake over a period of several months. All this time, it seems, the average Joe may have been ingesting more dangerous mercury than he thought.

    So, what is a tuna-lover to do? TIME asked the opinion of Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, and co-author of one of the most comprehensive studies to date on the impact of fish consumption on human health.

    Should we stop eating tuna?
    No. Overall, the dangers of not eating fish [including tuna] outweigh the small possible dangers from mercury. The recommended amount for adults is to eat one or two servings of fish per week — but probably only 10% to 20% of the population in the U.S. eats sufficient fish. The real danger in this country, the real concern, is that we're not eating enough fish. That is very likely increasing our rates of death from heart disease.

    What are the dangers of consuming high levels of mercury?
    In adults who eat fish with high levels of mercury very frequently — like, every day — there have been case reports that it causes neurologic symptoms, like sensory disturbances and imbalance. Again, that's in people who are eating fish very frequently and eating fish that are generally high in mercury. But the symptoms are temporary; they go away if you stop eating mercury.

    Really, the potential concern for long-term exposure at these levels is not with neurologic effects, but with cardiovascular effects. Two of five studies [that looked at the relationship between mercury and cardiovascular disease] suggested that at levels of mercury seen with typical consumption in Western populations, there might be cardiovascular effects long-term [increased risk of heart attack with higher levels of mercury]. But three of the five studies have not shown that.

    But both those two studies showed that fish consumption was still protective against cardiovascular disease. Overall, the evidence indicated that people who had higher mercury levels had less protection than people who had lower mercury levels. What those studies suggested is that mercury might lessen the benefit of fish [and omega-3 fatty acid] intake, but they didn't suggest that fish intake was harmful overall.

    Is there an optimal risk-benefit ratio for fish? How much omega-3 fatty acids should we get versus mercury?

    In commonly eaten fish, if there is any level of mercury where, for an adult [excluding women who are or may become pregnant], the potential risk will be greater than the potential benefit of omega-3s, I haven't seen any study that shows that. ... If there is a theoretical limit at which potential harm from mercury might exceed omega-3s, it's probably far higher than what we're seeing now. The idea that you're going to eat a fish meal as an adult and that it's going to give you net cardiovascular harm is just not supported by the current evidence.

    I know you want to get to this idea of a balance of risk versus benefit. The evidence suggests that the balance is always toward net benefit. If there were a fish that had almost no omega-3s and had high mercury, then the benefit might be surpassed. But most fish that have mercury tend to be the larger ocean-going fish that also tend to be high in omega-3s.

    Still, you can consume too much mercury with ill effects.
    If you have high-mercury fish every day for months to years you may get neurologic symptoms. The simplest way to avoid that problem is to eat a variety of fish and seafood. Both our report in 2006 in JAMA and the Institute of Medicine report, which were completely independent and came out at the same time, came to the same conclusion: There's no consistent evidence right now for significant health effects from mercury in adults, and the simplest way to avoid concern is to eat a variety of fish. We went further and recommended, to be prudent, that people who eat fish five or more times a week should choose lower-mercury fish.

    For people who eat a few servings per week or less, don't eat the same fish every time, and then you won't have to worry about whether this one is a little bit higher in mercury or this one is a little bit lower.

    Just so we know, which fish are higher and which are lower in mercury?
    Shellfish are almost all low in mercury because they don't live very long and they're small: shrimp, lobster, crab, scallops. And shellfish have medium levels of omega-3s, similar to other medium-size fish. Salmon are also good. They're high in omega-3s and low in mercury because they're also short lived.
    Light tuna is low in mercury, compared with white (albacore) or red (bluefin) tuna. On average white tuna has three times the mercury as light tuna. But on average white tuna has three times the omega-3s as light tuna — and all the evidence that we can see suggests that omega-3s have more benefit than mercury has harm.

    How significant is the EPA's accepted safety level?
    The EPA's limit is the acceptable limit of safety, which includes a 10-fold safety factor. That's not a risk level. That's the accepted safety level [0.1 mcg of mercury per kg of body weight per day]. That's 10 times lower than where the EPA determined that risk was occurring — which is a prudent safety limit to be certain that there is no risk. So, for example, if six pieces of tuna sushi a week would put you at the limit, that means you would have to eat 60 pieces to get to the level where the EPA determined risk is occurring.
    Also, it's important to note that the EPA set its safety limit based on the potential risks to infants and newborns, not based on the effects in adults.

    So, what's the bottom line?
    The bottom line is that there's inconclusive evidence that mercury has any long-term effects in adults at the levels that are commonly consumed, and that even if there are effects, studies suggest that they are only to lessen the benefit of the fish. That's important from a public health perspective — we might be getting even more benefit from fish on a population level if we took the mercury out, and that's a very important question that should be answered. But that doesn't mean that the individual person trying to decide on a fish meal should worry about mercury.

    I know I sound like I'm trying to downplay the risk but I really think we are experimenting with people's lives when we give recommendations or write stories or reports that make people eat less fish. We know from very good human studies that fish intake reduces the risk of dying from a heart attack by about a third. And heart attack is the #1 cause of death in the U.S. among both women and men. It's the #1 cause of death in almost every country in the world. And eating fish once or twice a week reduces that risk by a third. So if we're causing people not to eat fish or to choose to eat something other than fish because they're worried that the fish has some mercury in it, they're increasing their risk of dying from a heart attack for a concern that has not been established.
     
  14. ww_Crimson

    ww_Crimson New Member

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    It's probably about as dangerous as overdosing on water. It's doable, but unless you are eating it for breakfast lunch and dinner every day you're probably fine.
     
  15. xSteveO

    xSteveO Guest

    I shit out mercury
     
  16. Drewski

    Drewski New Member

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    the body only has a certain capacity to retain mercury. after that, its pissed right out.
     
  17. :|

    :| Guest

    there was an article out today saying that sushi tuna had the highest mercury content lemme find it..
     
  18. :|

    :| Guest

    High Mercury Levels Are Found in Tuna Sushi

    [​IMG] Tony Cenicola/The New York Times
    Tuna sushi is a popular item in New York but may be risky.

    MARIAN BURROS
    Published: January 23, 2008


    Recent laboratory tests found so much mercury in tuna sushi from 20 Manhattan stores and restaurants that at most of them, a regular diet of six pieces a week would exceed the levels considered acceptable by the Environmental Protection Agency.
    Multimedia

    [​IMG]Graphic


    Studies Link Other Ills to Mercury, Too (January 23, 2008)

    Times Topics: Mercury in Tuna

    Health Guide: Mercury


    Sushi from 5 of the 20 places had mercury levels so high that the Food and Drug Administration could take legal action to remove the fish from the market. The sushi was bought by The New York Times in October.


    “No one should eat a meal of tuna with mercury levels like those found in the restaurant samples more than about once every three weeks," said Dr. Michael Gochfeld, professor of environmental and occupational medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J.


    Dr. Gochfeld analyzed the sushi for The Times with Dr. Joanna Burger, professor of life sciences at Rutgers University. He is a former chairman of the New Jersey Mercury Task Force and also treats patients with mercury poisoning.


    The owner of a restaurant whose tuna sushi had particularly high mercury concentrations said he was shocked by the findings. “I’m startled by this,” said the owner, Drew Nieporent, a managing partner of Nobu Next Door. “Anything that might endanger any customer of ours, we’d be inclined to take off the menu immediately and get to the bottom of it.”


    Although the samples were gathered in New York City, experts believe similar results would be observed elsewhere.


    “Mercury levels in bluefin are likely to be very high regardless of location,” said Tim Fitzgerald, a marine scientist for Environmental Defense, an advocacy group that works to protect the environment and improve human health.


    Most of the restaurants in the survey said the tuna The Times had sampled was bluefin.


    In 2004 the Food and Drug Administration joined with the Environmental Protection Agency to warn women who might become pregnant and children to limit their consumption of certain varieties of canned tuna because the mercury it contained might damage the developing nervous system. Fresh tuna was not included in the advisory. Most of the tuna sushi in the Times samples contained far more mercury than is typically found in canned tuna.
    Over the past several years, studies have suggested that mercury may also cause health problems for adults, including an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and neurological symptoms.


    Dr. P. Michael Bolger, a toxicologist who is head of the chemical hazard assessment team at the Food and Drug Administration, did not comment on the findings in the Times sample but said the agency was reviewing its seafood mercury warnings. Because it has been four years since the advisory was issued, Dr. Bolger said, “we have had a study under way to take a fresh look at it.”


    No government agency regularly tests seafood for mercury.


    Tuna samples from the Manhattan restaurants Nobu Next Door, Sushi Seki, Sushi of Gari and Blue Ribbon Sushi and the food store Gourmet Garage all had mercury above one part per million, the “action level” at which the F.D.A. can take food off the market. (The F.D.A. has rarely, if ever, taken any tuna off the market.) The highest mercury concentration, 1.4 parts per million, was found in tuna from Blue Ribbon Sushi. The lowest, 0.10, was bought at Fairway.


    When told of the newspaper’s findings, Andy Arons, an owner of Gourmet Garage, said: “We’ll look for lower-level-mercury fish. Maybe we won’t sell tuna sushi for a while, until we get to the bottom of this.” Mr. Arons said his stores stocked yellowfin, albacore and bluefin tuna, depending on the available quality and the price.


    At Blue Ribbon Sushi, Eric Bromberg, an owner, said he was aware that bluefin tuna had higher mercury concentrations. For that reason, Mr. Bromberg said, the restaurant typically told parents with small children not to let them eat “more than one or two pieces.”


    Koji Oneda, a spokesman for Sushi Seki, said the restaurant would talk to its fish supplier about the issue. A manager at Sushi of Gari, Tomi Tomono, said it warned pregnant women and regular customers who “love to eat tuna” about mercury levels. Mr. Tomono also said the restaurant would put warning labels on the menu “very soon.”


    Scientists who performed the analysis for The Times ran the tests several times to be sure there was no mistake in the levels of methylmercury, the form of mercury found in fish tied to health problems.



    ______________________________________________



    I remember when Daphne Zuniga went on a special diet that was rich in seafood, and she wound up with mercury poisoning. ABC News: Actress Describes Mercury Poisoning Ordeal



    A doctor and a trainer have both suggested to me that I take a fish oil supplement. I was weirded out that I might get too much mercury, but apparently the oil doesn't come from the part of the fish that would contain the mercury?


    I called a compounding pharmacy in Baltimore that I use for other stuff, and apparently there *is* such a risk depending on what manufacturer you use.
     
  19. ReFreshing

    ReFreshing OT Supporter

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    im confused. so should i be worried?
     
  20. phyphoestilic

    phyphoestilic New Member

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    I think ur fine if ur around 1-2 cans a day.
     
  21. keeler

    keeler New Member

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    single serving canned salmon ftw
     
  22. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

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    To add a useful article. It was a legitimate bump. Deal with it.
     
  23. Drewski

    Drewski New Member

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    if thats the case, I probably get more mercury in one trip to all you can sushi then I do in in a years worth of tuna :mamoru:
     
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