Memphis speakers cutting out on the highs.

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by stillwell, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. stillwell

    stillwell Who wants Ice Cream?

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    I bought a pair of used Memphis 4x6 speakers, and they sound great. Most of the time. The tweeter on one side cuts in and out intermittantly. I'm guessing that it has something to do with the connection that goes through a yellow canister looking thing that's about the size of a 1/3 roll of dimes. Is that something that can be replaced with parts from Radio Shack?

    Any other ideas?
     
  2. 04

    04 Guest

    Yes, the canister looking thing (its called a capacitor) can be replaced. However, it could be something other than the capacitor causing the problem. The tweeter itself could be damaged, or you could have a problem with one of the wires or connections making intermittant contact.
     
  3. stillwell

    stillwell Who wants Ice Cream?

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    Thanks for the reply! The thing that makes me think it's the capcitor (and thank you for keeping me from sounding like a total moron) is that when it works, it sounds so clear and pure (ruling out bad tweeter, I'd think) and it doesn't seem to be affected by vibration or movement of the car (ruling out wire contact) but I'll check it out.

    Are there markings on the capacitor to let me know what to get as a replacement if it comes to that?

    Are you watching OU-UT this weekend? I've got to pay $20 for PPV if I want to watch it.
     
  4. 04

    04 Guest

    Well, if the capacitor was broken, it wouldnt intermittently sound good or bad, it would always sound bad, unless of course one of the terminals came loose or something. Same could be said about the tweeter.

    You'll find two or three markings on the capacitor. One will be for the maximum temperature, which is in degrees centegrade, one for the amount of capacitance, which is measured in microfards or 'uF' and the final will be the maximum voltage rating. You need to make sure th capacitance ratings match. Also, make sure the voltage rating on the replacement capacitor is not lower than that on the stock one.

    I suggest that if you are going to upgrade the capacitor, to buy two and replace the capacitor on each speaker. Id reccomend buying a mylar or polypropelene type capacitor, as they could actually improve the sound in some cases over electrolytic (which is likely what the capacitor that it came with is). Mylar or polypropelyne capacitors shouldnt cost more than 5-6 dollars for two of them.

    As for the football game, I'm not a big football fan, so I don't know if I'll watch the game or not :o
     

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