McCain - No Federal Assistance for American Automakers

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    He moves away from state-set emissions limits, rejects federal bailout of Big 3

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    Gordon Trowbridge / Detroit News Washington Bureau
    Saturday, June 28, 2008

    WARREN, Ohio -- Republican presidential candidate John McCain said Friday he favors nationwide limits on carbon emissions from cars, a position that addresses one major worry of Detroit's automakers but could create new problems for them.

    The presumptive GOP nominee also said he would oppose any federal bailout of domestic carmakers to keep them afloat -- an issue that took on new urgency this week as auto stocks plunged and Wall Street analysts suggested the companies may not have enough cash to last through the transition from trucks and SUVs to smaller cars.

    McCain has supported a controversial request from California and other states to be allowed to set their own limits on greenhouse gasses from autos, a request automakers have said threatens their future. His Democratic opponent, Barack Obama, supports the request as well. The Bush administration turned it down late last year. Asked about the issue Friday, before a visit to GM's Lordstown assembly plant here, McCain said he hoped as president to eliminate the need for state regulations.

    "It seems to me the reason California went the way they did was because we, federally, failed to act to address greenhouse gas emissions," McCain told a small group of reporters on his campaign bus. "So my goal would be to see a federal standard that every state could embrace. ... I think we can achieve a status where that would go away."

    Automakers have said the request by California and a dozen other states could cripple them, in part because a patchwork of state regulations would make compliance far too expensive. Troy Clarke, GM's president of North American operations, said Friday a single national standard would "be very helpful in our eyes."

    But a federal standard at or near what California has proposed -- which would likely require automakers' fleets to average 43 miles per gallon by 2016 -- would almost certainly face opposition from automakers. Just last year, Congress passed legislation pushing fuel economy standards to 35 mpg by 2020, a mark Clarke said Friday "isn't a chip shot. ... It's a difficult reach."

    Environmental groups, too, could oppose any federal effort to limit states' ability to set their own standards. "We would always want the federal government to be a floor and not a ceiling" for such regulations, said Karen Wayland, legislative director for the National Resources Defense Council. Politically, she said, it's unlikely that Congress would approve rules that go as far as California wants.

    On his campaign bus and in a later news conference at the Lordstown plant, McCain said he does not see the federal government rescuing any of the U.S. automakers, as happened in the 1970s with Chrysler.

    "Frankly I just don't see a scenario where the federal government would come in and bail out any industry in America today," he said -- a comment Democrats may well contrast with the Federal Reserve's decision to partially finance the rescue of Wall Street investment firm Bear Stearns.

    Ohio Democrats and the Obama campaign panned McCain's visit even before he landed in northeastern Ohio on Friday. Rep. Tim Ryan, the Democrat who represents the area, and a United Auto Workers local president from the plant ripped McCain for his support of free-trade deals.

    "It's sort of ironic for him to go to Canada, and now apparently to Colombia and Mexico, to talk about trade," said James Graham, president of UAW Local 1112. "He should go to Michigan and some of these other states that have been devastated by trade agreements."

    McCain addressed the trade issue and others during a short question-and-answer session with plant employees. Asked by a worker about how to make trade deals "more fair," McCain answered with his familiar case: that erecting trade barriers would be bad for the economy, but that he wants to do more for workers who lose jobs to overseas competition, including giving them partial compensation for lost wages.

    The campaign chose the Lordstown plant to end a weeklong campaign swing focused on energy policy because it makes the compact Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5. The plant will add a third production shift at the plant next month to keep up with demand for the smaller, more fuel-efficient cars.

    "I am convinced that what is being done at the Lordstown assembly plant is the future of the American auto industry," McCain told workers here.

    http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080628/POLITICS01/806280338/1148/AUTO01
     
  2. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    June Sales - GM -26.2% Ford -31.4%, Chrysler -30.1%

    Even Toyota is down 6.6%
     
  3. red97gst

    red97gst New Member

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    This is a tricky issue.

    I'd consider myself more a democrat than republican, but I think free markets should dictate this issue. If consumers really wanted MPG above all else, then automakers would respond to demand (which they already are...as evidenced by increased investment in hybrid and cylinder shut-off technology).

    I think this type of forced change is bad news. It's going to result in a lower quality automobile pushed on consumers, I think, due to having to rush to meet regulations.

    The Dem is championing states' rights, and the Republican wants the Fed Govt to play big brother here. Interesting...

    I think they are both wrong, but I agree more with McCain. Fuel consumption and air quality are national, not state issues. That's why we have the EPA...(for better or worse ... since the EPA blows ass)
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    It's sad just how Cali wants to control EVERYTHING. Fucking commies.



    And I hate how gov's are trying to FORCE people into smaller vehicles. If someone wants a truck let them buy it. They will pay at the pump -- don't make them pay other ways, as well.

    Freedom is becoming a joke.
     
  5. DeepRun™

    DeepRun™ Guest

    This should only give them more incentive to bring over the European "hot-hatches" that are both fuel efficient and quick. Ford had the Puma and Focus in RS versions that would've been popular if marketed correctly.
     
  6. GammaRadiation

    GammaRadiation Active Member

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    Cool, let's choke out the auto industry and start sending MORE money over seas.
     
  7. Toke

    Toke New Member

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    US Government- "We only exist to bail out massive banking firms who lose billions of dollars and lose millions of homes. We have no interest in helping out American industry."
     
  8. red97gst

    red97gst New Member

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    "Oh, right, yeah, that must be the flux capacitator. excellent welding there."

    I love these useless photo ops, as if the politician gives a fuck about what they are lookin at :rofl:
     
  9. Smelly-Kitten

    Smelly-Kitten Dept. of Redundancy Department *Side Pipes

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    How about my freedom to live in a clean country of moderate climates?
    Regardless of that fact that i like the idea of the government bailing out these companies so that they can remain making high horsepower car that i love, the government isn't dictating people's needs. Perhaps adjusting their incentives, but it's the market (and economics currently) that's pushing out the big three, not the government. Demand is for a smaller more fuel efficient car right now, not the government's fault that their supply of escalades and excursions aren't being sold.
     
  10. CJPA

    CJPA New Member

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    [​IMG]
    "Things have come a long way since my Stutz Bearcat"
     
  11. art_VW_shark

    art_VW_shark OT Supporter

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    free market principles FTW
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Seriously, what is with the Federal government thinking they need to control everything? The reason we have a federal system in the first place is so Congress doesn't have to foist a single standard on everyone if it's not appropriate. California didn't set its own standards because the Feds failed to act appropriately, they set their own standards because the Feds did act appropriately -- SoCal has a unique geography (i.e. the Los Angeles Basin) that amplifies the effects of air pollution more than any other locale in North America -- and California dealt with its own problem by itself, like it's supposed to.

    Should there be a Federal emission standard? Yes, there should be a bare-minimum baseline that anything that runs in the USA has to conform to, but there already is one. If it's time to raise the baseline a bit, fine, but don't take away the power of the states to meet their own needs independently if that's what they need to do.
     

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