Martial Arts?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by edrox, May 22, 2005.

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  1. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    OK - I am not sure this is the right forum, but it fits here better than most of the others. Since there are several variations on the many martial arts styles, what do you like best?

    What martial arts discipline do you follow and why? What made you choose your style over the others?

    I chose to train in Aikido, and have been at it for about 9 months. Getting ready to test for 5th kyu next week and I am very excited. Passing this test means that I am actually learning the art and advancing.

    I chose Aikido becuase it is a "soft style". At my age, I am not really into a lot of kicking and striking. Instead, Aikido teaches leveraged throws and pins, locks, and re-direction of your opponents' energy. I also like the fact that the art, and my sensei, believe in respecting your attacker. You want to subdue the attacker without necessarily injuring him, or yourself.
     
  2. Jeff Merr

    Jeff Merr Elite Member

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    this has been discussed to death, use the search function
     
  3. brolli

    brolli OT Supporter

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    aikido is notorious for not ebing effective no matter how much you practice it. Brazilian jiu jitsu/muay thai/wrestling/boxing is your best bet for learning to fight for real.
     
  4. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    "Notorious"? Among whom?

    Which is the difference between a 'soft' and 'hard' style of martial arts. All of the style you mentioned are hard styles.

    And to you, Jeff, I would say that 70% of the posts in this forum are covered in other threads. If you don't like the thread, don't post in it and move on to something you do like.
     
  5. lilox

    lilox Live fast, Die old

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    what style of aikido are you learning?
     
  6. joy division

    joy division New Member

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    So by your standards, "soft" means things for little kids and women that won't work in a fight and "hard" = proven fighting techniques one could use in the ring? Sounds good to me.
     
  7. FloppyCock

    FloppyCock New Member

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    Without sounding too elitist, when is the last time you saw a competitor in MMA with an aikido background?
     
  8. Socrates

    Socrates New Member

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    mma is gay
     
  9. Jeff Merr

    Jeff Merr Elite Member

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    :werd:
     
  10. Ilyusha

    Ilyusha Guest

    WING TSUN/WING CHUN > ALL MOTHERFUCKERS...lc
     
  11. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    :mamoru::franktrigg:
     
  12. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    to the original poster:

    all styles have something valid to offer, congrats on your accomplishment in aikido

    My stand up training is about 50 percent traditional muay thai and 50 percent western boxing. My ground training is a blend of jj, freestyle wrestling and nhb style subs. I chose this style of training because it is effective in the ring under limited rules competition.
     
  13. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    Well, I guess I was right about this being the wrong forum.

    Those of you who chose to bash Aikido as a viable style for competition obviously only understand one side of a martial art. There is much more to being a practitioner of any true art, as its founders intended, than fighting. Why have there been no AIkido champions in MMA? Because the founder of the art - Morehi Ueshiba - believed in training the spirit of the aikidoka as well as the body. This means that Aikido practitioners are discouraged from competitions and unnecesary physical displays, as their only point is to build ego - not body or spirit.

    Most Japanese and Chinese styles of MA teach restraint, discipline, and humility as part of the spirituality of their style. Then, hold competitions which defy all of those aspects.

    If the posters of those childish, negative remarks are MA practitioners, you have obviosuly neglected the intellectual and spiritual side of your training. If you are not MA practitioners, you might benefit from a few classes in a traditional style (ie Tai Chi Chuan, Aikido, karate).

    Now, as for a 'soft' style as opposed to a 'hard' style: "Hard" styles of MA include karate and jiu jitsu. They are typically focused on strikes and kicks to the opponent. "Soft" styles include Tai Chi Chuan and Aikido. THey typically focus on qi enerergy, redirection of force, and, when necessary, joint locks and submission holds.

    Aikido teaches that conflict should be avoided whenever possible (hence the lack of competitions). Should conflict arise, we are taught to respect our attackers as human beings - to bring the conflict to a resolution without either party being injured, if at all possible. This is accomplished through redirection of the attacker's force and, when necessary, joint locks and submission holds that will subdue an attacker without seriously injuring him. In example: the founder of Aikido - Morehi Ueshiba - was once attacked by a former student he had sent out of his school. The attacker was armed with a sword, Ueshiba was unarmed. Ueshiba "fought" the student for several hours, continually redirecting and throwing his opponent until the attacker had exhausted all of his energy and was easily subdued. Neither party was injured, Ueshiba was victorious.

    NHB - Have you participated in many ring matches? How have you fared? I watch MMA competitions from time to time and have a great deal of respect for the athletes that compete. Takes a lot of training and mental toughness to step up to that pounding.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2005
  14. lilox

    lilox Live fast, Die old

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    I am training in the Tomikikai Style of aikido, Tomikikai introduced and element of competiion to aikido,

    Aikido is not designed for mixed style competition though, in traditional aikido there are no attacks (although the first 5 of the kata can be used as attacks), however my instructor has been training for 35 years and I would warn anyone to be wary of attacking him, although aikido is about leaving no ill effects the locks make it extremely easy to break a wrist.

    I love aikido for the exercise, the mental training and the physical awareness it brings, I train about 5 hours a week currently and would do more if i could, its a strange art, you either love it and practise for life or you get bored quickly and look for a more "instant out of the box art",


    I do however plan to learn Kempo jujitsu at some stage, but mainly to fill in the gaps that aikido leaves, I will never leave aikido however
     
  15. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    Well said.
     
  16. Maestro Nobones

    Maestro Nobones Great Job! - GLAD DADS CREW

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    my background is in kung fu, and this year I started training in a progressive tang soo do dojo, it's a little bit of karate, with western boxing punches, thai shin kicks, elbows, and defense, some kung fu hand techniques, JJJ and chin na standing locks etc, and BJJ on the ground. It's a pretty nice style, I've learned a lot in the last 3 months.

    I'll be supplimenting this training soon by taking day classes at the local gracie academy, where they also train muay thai.
     
  17. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    I tired Gracie Jiu Jitsu when I lived in Reno. Went for about 4 months. I am just too old to take that kind of beating!
     
  18. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    Lilox - Very true. Even with the 5th kyu control (wrist lock) it is easy to see how it could break a wrist or tear a shoulder apart. I knew of some practitioners who started up competitions, but I am not interested in that, personally.

    Ans so true about attaking your sensei, or mine. I doubt there would ever come a reason to do so, but if one should, it might go a lot differently than one expected! There is a sensei in Boulder City, NV who is easily in his 70s. He can't perform a roundhouse head-kick, but I would hate to see anyone try to do it to him.
     
  19. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    How old are you?
     
  20. Section 8

    Section 8 New Member

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    Jiu-jitsu uses submissions + joint locks too.
     
  21. Larry Lex

    Larry Lex New Member

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    I've dabbled in jeet kune do, indonesian silat, muay thai, and wing chun, but the sport I keep coming back to is plain jane western boxing. But, I'm transferring to either UCLA or Cal this fall and I'm set on training at a MMA school with hopes of one day competing. LA is a goddamn mecca of MMA gyms but I've narrowed it down to training sambo/judo with gokor (UFC welterweight karo parisyan's teacher) or no-gi BJJ with Eddie Bravo. Both are respected schools and much cheaper than the Gracie academies (there's hundreds of them in LA). If i go to Cal, I'll train BJJ/submission wrestling with Sergio Silva. Either way, I'm looking forward to learning the ground game.

    And some of you need to stop dismissing aikido. Every martial art has its merits, which are not only limited to MMA applicability.
     
  22. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    There are dozens of MMA schools here in LV as well. I guess that with all the UBC fights here, a lot of the fighters and trainers live here as well.
     
  23. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    I'll be 40 in August.
     
  24. Larry Lex

    Larry Lex New Member

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    UFC great Randy Couture was still kicking young bucks' asses at the ripe old age of 41. Of course, there's only one randy and the guy is a freak of nature, but I'm just saying that being 40 shouldn't keep you from learning a great art like BJJ. It's mostly mental and technique based, not as physically demanding as the striking styles.
     
  25. edrox

    edrox A good man, and thorough

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    You bet he is. However, I am willing to bet a couple of years' income that he started training LONG before I did. He didn't just start a year ago.

    Plus, as I have said before, I am not interested in that style or competing. It is great for some people, but not for me.
     
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