GUN Making Bullets

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by no7fish, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. no7fish

    no7fish New Member

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    So, how many of you cast? I should say, how many have cast and how many of you guys still do? I've never done it but my dad has in the past. It isn't so much work really with the right equipment but I don't care to shoot bare lead all the time.

    I've been doing some research on swaging bullets. It seems Corbin has a bunch of diffferent options for this stuff but it's all very difficult to navigate and determine exactly what products go with what methods, etc....

    Any of you guys swaged bullets before? I would be interested in doing it but it seems like a lot of pulls of the press handle just to produce one useful projectile, and then you have to put it into something too! If there were a progressive system I might be more inclined to get into it...

    Any thoughts guys?
     
  2. 993kgt

    993kgt building an airplane whee

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    raw lead ftl
     
  3. Cannondale

    Cannondale OT Supporter

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    For something like a .38 special or .45 Colt I see no reason to not use lead.

    Maybe you are talking about using antimony or tin with the bullets, which I think is good. I have 75+ lbs of tire weights sitting in my garage for when I get some casting equipment.
     
  4. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    A benchrest shooter I'm pretty close to used to make his own match bullets, but had largely gotten out of it by the time I started really hanging around with him.

    Still had all of his old equipment setup, and told me a little about it. He did it so he could make better bullets, not to save money. I know he had a LOT of time and money into the setup, and I don't think it would be at all economically feasable for someone to get into it unless you were pretty serious.

    As far as casting your own stuff, a neighbor who shoots lots of blackpowder matches has an underground bunker where he stores lead, powder and such, and casts his own roundballs. Pretty cool, but fuck dealing with that mess unless you shoot a whole bunch, and even then I don't know if it would be worth it unless you want another hobby. You can buy lead bullets fairly cheap, especially if you can find someone local (save on shipping).
     
  5. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    too many health risks :hs:
     
  6. 993kgt

    993kgt building an airplane whee

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    raw lead sucks ass to shoot too....especially in 45 caliber or so

    if you don't have the equipment to make your own jackets, its not really worth it, and even that is pricey $3500+
     
  7. phoenixTX

    phoenixTX New Member

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    Last weeks Shotgun News had an article on 'free bullets'. The article was about using fired .22LR cases to make .223 FMJ rounds. They described the process: pressing the lead in to the case, swaging the rim to extend the length of the case, then crimping the new round for loading into your own brass. They made it sound like this was just a simple step if you're already reloading. :dunno:
     
  8. Hooligan

    Hooligan New Member

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    I am thinking of doing this but with ar15 lowers. I would mill them myself so let me know if you're interested.

    But srsly, I'm just here to see what those in the know say. I feel like if it was economical tar would be doing it already.
     
  9. JaimeZX

    JaimeZX Formerly of :Sep 2001: fame - Also: Sprout Crew OT Supporter

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    I read an article a long time ago in G&A that said tire weights were the perfect alloy for bullet casting. Armed with that knowledge and the need for some lead weights of his own, my friend went to Discount Tire and they gave him a huge-ass bucket of wheel weights. He melted them down and cast them into ingots for later use. Didn't seem too hard (no pun intended) although he never cast them into bullets, so :dunno: about the last bit.
     
  10. Cannondale

    Cannondale OT Supporter

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    I'm going to a Discount Tire this week for tire rotation, hopefully they will extend the same courtesy to me.
     
  11. striker754

    striker754 Chillin

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  12. no7fish

    no7fish New Member

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    So here's where I've done most of my reading so far. The press doesn't look that special, like something I could probably make at work. The dies though are a bit specialized and I don't think I could make them myself for less than they sell it.

    http://www.corbins.com/howto.htm


    I'm sure financially it's worth it, get free lead, get free .22 brass, etc, make .224 bullets. I'm not sure about other calibers though since it sounds like you have to buy copper tube of some sort from them.

    The whole thing comes down to whether it's worth it to pull a press handle a couple more times to make a round. I'm not sure it is... Anyone else? I mean if it were progressive in some way then you could produce a bullet for each pull and then load them into your press and build a cartridge with each pull, but with a regular press and this swaging system it looks like at least 2-3 pulls for each projectile and then 2-3 pulls to make a round (depending on bullet shape and whether you count priming with a hand tool)
     
  13. AustinL911

    AustinL911 Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator

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    How hard would it be to turn your own brass bullets in a lathe?

    I'd think if you had a .400+ cal precision rifle, this would be the way to go.
     
  14. no7fish

    no7fish New Member

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    Not that hard if you have a CNC lathe, although the material costs would rape you like a new inmate. If you're talking manual... well I'd rather slit my wrists. I suppose you could make truncated cones pretty easily but anything with a rounded ogive would not really be happening.
     
  15. acoop101

    acoop101 New Member

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    It's not that easy to do with a manual lathe but is really very easy if you have a computer controlled (CNC) Machine tool, I've made some solid copper .310 hollow point bullets for reloading in 7.62X54r so that I could take my 91-30 tula mosin out hunting here in central california where we can only hunt with lead free ammo on public land.
     
  16. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    Don't usually hear of brass bullets, but there are several all-copper lathe turned solids available on the market. Most are for 338 on up, specifically to excel in the ELR game. I've never really dealt with them, but I know they are incredibly expensive, sometimes require a different barrel setup (in regards to twist, and actual bore size), and the manufacturing technology to make really cool ones is really really trick.

    Google "Lost River Ballistics" (which is defunct, and is now Hooker tactical), CheyTac, and 375/408. That's where most of the discussion on lathe turned monolithic centers around. Snipers Hide has had some excellent discussion about such subjects, but much of it has been lost/deleted over time (which is a true shame).
     

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