A&P Los Angeles Artist looking for a jump start

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Stevie DV, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I am Stevie DV. I am here in LA trying to jump start an art career. I have kept most my work in my room since I was 14. my GF convinced me to put it out there, so here it is. I am now 25 and really get down to painting. I am considered a stencil/street/wheatpasting artist I guess. Well here is some of my work. Any advice would be great. Many collabs in here as well.

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    Gave away on Kidrobot.com, I spray painted this on a sketchbook cover 9x12" spraypaint and acrylic 2008

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    I cannot afford Audrey Kawasaki's work, so I made my own 18x24" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2009

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    Saw this on a magazine, so I went home and painted it 14x18" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2008

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    Did this in about an hour for someone.. quick $65 14x18" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2008

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    Gave this away at the Fly or Die 1 year anniversary party. The item was a hit 14x14" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2008

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    16x22" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2008
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    24x30" on canvas in spraypaint and acrylic 2008
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    Audrey Hepburn 12x16" on wooden panel canvas? in spraypaint and acrylic 2008

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    24x48" on plywood in spraypaint 2008

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    24" x 36" on canvas in spraypaint 2008

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    HUGE 24x48" on canvas in spraypaint 2008

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    Unfortunately, this was severly damaged by water 24x36" on canvas in spraypaint 2008

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    14x18" on canvas in spraypaint 2008

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    9x12" on canvas in spraypaint 2008

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    Sold this on ebay for $25 when I lost my job, 16x20" on canvas in spraypaint 2007

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    8x10" on canvas in spraypaint 2005

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    suitcase size on my art supplies wooden carring case done in spraypaint 2004
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  2. Devin

    Devin New Member

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    I would buy that. I need art for my walls.
     
  3. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    dude can i buy some? that shit is dope
     
  4. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    Thanks, I think you only saw the first one as I was still editing hahah. :bowdown::wiggle:
     
  5. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    sure.. but I gave away most of them, some sold
     
  6. TheManLouisianaFace

    TheManLouisianaFace and decide!

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    werd that's awesome man
     
  7. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I just realized this is a photographers forum.. sorry everyone. This was all taken on my iphone. Wish I had a camera
     
  8. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    Stevie Pm me maybe we can trade art work or maybe collaborate, i wouldnt mind driving down to LA for some projects
     
  9. Justin Niggalake

    Justin Niggalake New Member

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    dude, that shit is hot.
    i like your work man :bowdown:
     
  10. asdfbunk

    asdfbunk A Member OT Supporter

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    Art is before photography, don't let these elitist prick faggots tell you otherwise :mamoru:

    Seriously though, those are pretty awesome. If I weren't dirt poor, unemployed, in debt, and in school, I would beg you to sell me a few.
     
  11. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I do have a store, but it is for lack of better words....lame

    I don't know how to design web sites blah blah. if anyone wants to offer their services I would be oh so grateful.
     
  12. HighTachPres

    HighTachPres New Member

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    dope shizzzzz, you like the wimmenz :naughty:
     
  13. darkjedi

    darkjedi Muay Thai expert

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    your pieces are awesome.. You just need a website and you can make some serious change selling that stuff.
     
  14. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    Yes sir, They are my inspiration and motivation.... like most men
     
  15. mrtwo

    mrtwo New Member

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    nice! :bowdown:
     
  16. 3x

    3x New Member

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    hella bro*cal
    that shit is mad dope, son

    do you use montana paint for all of that?
     
  17. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    I use acrylic paint too. I used to use belton, but it is no longer available in most locations
     
  18. ov3n

    ov3n Active Member

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    Those are sick, man. I dig the robot one and the pony tail girl one.

    Some look a little too vectorized as if they were done on the computer.
     
  19. Climbing Cracker

    Climbing Cracker I am the Devil. And I am here to do the Devil's w

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  20. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    great work :cool:
     
  21. f/2.8L

    f/2.8L New Member

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    So you're using a stencil to paint the women? Some of them look like prints from a computer overlaid onto a painted background. I like 'em, just trying to understand your technique.
     
  22. Primal

    Primal Pavement Killer

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    Awesome work. I love the building one and the robot one. Do you do all these with rattle cans? Either way , pure beauty.
     
  23. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    You are fortunate to be living at a time and place where your painting just might be recognized by the art world. LACMA has recently been expanded, and the expansion is largely built around a large bequest from a sponsor whose collection is... modern art. Up in the Bay Area there is a retired winery owner who doesn't pay top prices, but his collection of Northern California moderns is the envy of many museums. OK, so maybe you don't want to move North at the moment, but it is something to keep in mind if you would like recognition. Best bet though is to crack the Southern California art market first, then think about some of the other major markets. New York is still probably the top US art market, but don't overlook Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, Santa Fe, and even Seattle (no particular order).

    So how do you do it? First, you have to begin thinking more like an entrepenure. Develope a business plan with budgets and timelines for objectives leading toward your eventual goal. There are several good books available about marketing and running your studio on a business-like basis. Keep records, of everything. Every expenditure, and every product you produce has to be documented, and reviewed periodically. Doesn't sound like fun, does it? It isn't, but organization is essential both in achieving your goal(s) and satisfying the IRS and many galleries who love screwing the last penny out of artists.

    Painting is not unlike making it in the show business. Zillions want to be rich and famous, glamorous celebrities who can dictate their own terms. Competition for the attention of top collectors, galleries and museums is fierce, and only a very few ever reach the top. One of the essentials in marketing yourself and your work is self-promotion. You can't be shy and retiring with your work seldom seen outside of your studio, or a small circle of admirers. You want attention, you have to go out and get it for yourself. Take every opportunity to have your work seen by as many people as possible. Again, not fun for most painters who tend to be a bit reclusive and happiest when working alone without external pressures.

    LACMA runs a number of outreach programs, and they are a great opportunity to get to know the curators and staff at the museum. Enroll in some of those programs, and impress the hell out of the staff you come in contact with. A LACMA drawing class typically is filled with amateurs, many of whom are art-minded, but untrained and sometimes without much clue as to how art is created. You can be a big fish in that sort of crowd. Spend lots, and lots of time at the museum so that your face and your work becomes familiar there. I used to sit out on the patio with a sketchbook drawing whatever came to mind. You can probably sell enough stuff to the tourists to pay for your museum contacts. By spending lots of time at the museum studying, and copying the works that "fit" into your vision may be as good as an MFA in terms of building your skill set and creative tools. If you're any good, at some point the museum may consider offering you an opportunity to be shown there, perhaps in their rental gallery, or as a leader in one of their art outreach programs. This sort of opportunity can lead to their including something of your's in their collection.

    Gallery owners are greedy exploiters of artists. One out of thousands MIGHT throw you a bone on the hope that you will make them rich. They don't promote you out of the goodness of their hearts. They show your work in the expectation of selling them, and their maximum profit is enhanced by paying you the least they can get away with. Unknown painters will only get about 50%, of the sales price... and many gallery owners will try to calculate that on the net, not the gross. They'll often take their time paying you, and then it will be in the form of a check. Those checks are reported to the IRS, so you probably will need an accountant and a separate bank account just to protect you from the IRS. Small galleries can also be a risk. I once had a gallery disappear in the middle of the night with about a year's worth of my product. Gone and never recovered. At the time my records weren't good, so I can't even be sure what exactly was stolen or its relative value. Just gone. Once you have a gallery representing you, you can no longer sell direct to collectors. Do that, and you'll likely be blackballed by all galaries who will not compete with their artists for sales.

    Sound like fun yet? It isn't, and it takes an almost unbeliveable amount of time and agony for most artists. Which would you rather do, (1) spend two or three days in the studio working on your latest projects, or (2) spend the same amount of time... or more... arranging a gallery show (contracts, work selection, hanging, etc.), standing around for 4-6 hours making small talk with people who might buy something while getting sloshed on cheap wine, then waiting around for maybe a month or six waiting to find out if you made any money on the effort before reclaiming what hasn't sold, checking for damage/making insurance claims, getting the money to your accountant, and.... Most of us would take option 1, but if you want to be recognized by the art world you have to bite the bullet.

    Some artists seem to be so talented they don't have to pay the price. BS. Picasso, Dali, almost any other 20th century artist who is widely known and collected were shameless when it came to self-promotion. Until they became rich and famous, many spent as much time doing the scut work as they did in the studio.

    Your work shown here has potential, but no more than many other painters who are out there dreaming of becoming immortal figures in Art History. You have the potential, but that isn't enough. There is no substitute for work, and much of the work is unpleasant and even counter-productive to developing your full aesthetic vision.

    If your vision is more important to you than being recognized, rich and famous with legionis of collectors and fans eager to have a piece of you, then get used to work in obscurity. Vincent sold almost nothing in his lifetime, and those were to his brother, Theo. Mad, unhappy, lonely, and obscesses with bending pigment to his internal vision, he was unknown and unappreciated by the art world. After his death, and because Theo did all that scut work, the Art World discovered Van Goug. Without Theo to promote his work Vincint's work might still be purchased for a few hundreds, or thousands, instead of the millions that even his lesser work commands.

    The Art World is fickle. Rembrant was able to command high prices for his early work because it catered to the needs, wants, and desires of his market... influential collectors. He fell out of fashion when his vision was no longer fashionable. Some of the greatest work of that immensly talented painter came near the end of his life and was almost unsellable. He died poor, and it took decades before his work was "discovered" and became fashionable again.

    You are fortunate, you get to choose which star to follow.
     
  24. Stevie DV

    Stevie DV Artist

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    stencils layered. hours and hours of cutting with my exacto. All on a painted acrylic background.

    Thanks for the direction Asherman. I now know where to start
     
  25. pawis

    pawis werd em up

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    im diggin' this, great work man :big grin:
     

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