looking for network gear

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by synthetic, Jun 23, 2006.

  1. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    managed switches (prefer to do full gbic fiber network in my condo)

    routers ...cisco 2600, juniper, etc
     
  2. vwgeekdotcom

    vwgeekdotcom Silver Surfer

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    Is this a request?
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    why?

    For a basic condo, gigabit over copper is almost always a better choice. Much cheaper. Fibre runs become viable when distance prohibits copper links, or you have other concerns, such as grounding. For example, a multi-building campus would use fibre to link each node to the CMDF, and you would use fibre between floors to link each IDF to the MDF. In larger buildings, fibre can be used across a given floor when distance exceeds 100 meters, or the end-point has a varied potential.

    None of these concerns are afforded in a typical condo.
     
  4. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    fiber is cool. that is why.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    retard of the day goes to......
     
  6. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    So how many thousands of dollars is your budget? eBay is probably your best bet.
     
  7. EagerZeroedThick

    EagerZeroedThick New Member

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    condo meaning: 1 apartment

    or

    condo meaning: multiple housings aka a hotel / motel ???

    how many potential users?
    ebay?
    google?
    froogle?
    what are you trying to accomplish?

    fill in the blanks please.
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Fiber does have some distinct advantages, but it has disadvantages too. Fiber won't transmit power surges and you can add bandwidth by adding more colors of light, but it is very fragile (it's made of glass) and it can't be looped or curved around a circle smaller than a specific diameter or the light beam will refract out of the fiber and into the plastic sheath, at which point the light simply disappears at the recieving end. Try troubleshooting that when the fiber is hidden inside your wall.

    Properly surge-protected FoC or plain-old Gigabit Ethernet is a more cost-effective solution, especially since you'll have a hard time exceeding 500kbps for LAN-to-internet transfers anyway. Have you priced fiber-channel network cards yet? Your eyes will fall out of your head.
     
  9. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    In a condo, you wouldn't wanna use glass fiber. You'd wanna use plastic fiber. But then, you'd actually wanna use copper, so its pretty academic.
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If I recall, even plastic fiber has a thin glass core surrounded by a clear plastic coating, instead of two different densities of glass. I don't think they can make plastic clear enough to use as the core in a fiber cable. Consider that sending a signal through fiber is like looking through a kilometer-thick window; it's gotta be a fucking clear window, or you won't see a thing.
     
  11. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    i have about 10 servers, and running 15mb down 2mb up internet. fiber cards i can get for about 150$
     
  12. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    True, plastic gets much less range. But it can handle a condo.

    Gigabit ethernet over copper is for you, OP. Anything else is a waste of money.
     
  13. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    dawt
     
  14. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    well, considering a decent gigabit card is about $30-40, and a really nice one (server-grade) is $100, you'd save money with copper. And we're not even into the wiring expense... Or the switches.


    Copper > Fibre for you.
     
  15. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    i am half a mile way from dark fiber to sonet ring? shhh
     
  16. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Hey, if you just want to have fiber, fine, install fiber. But we did warn you.
     
  17. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    what does that have to do with anything? Many providers (such as Cogent, and Hunter) use Dark Fibre and SoNet rings to form Metropoletan Area Networks, but their POP equipment converts a mostly *proprietary* fibre signal into a usable ethernet port. And this ethernet port (within Gigabit bandwidth constraints) is typically copper. Fibre only remains prevelant in larger business or data center operations, or when bandwidth exceeds Gigabit and approaches 10Gigabit.

    So even on that MAN, you'd still likely end up with copper. And we're ignoring the fact that you DON'T get gigabit. With 15Mbps/2Mbps internet connection, you're probably only getting a 100bTX line, which is exclusively copper.

    But, for sake of argument, lets say you did manage to get a fibre drop from the POP.... Nothing changes that you are STILL BETTER OFF running copper throughout the condo... Then you use a router with one fibre interface, and two-three copper interfaces (depending on how you want the network setup. I'd almost recommend an "orange" DMZ network utilizing it's own subnet of statically-assigned public-routable addresses for servers, and then a "green" interface utilizing NAT and SPI with a dynamically-assigned non-routable subnet for your normal workstations) to connect to everything else. And that's assuming a router with a fibre interface card. Otherwise, you could do a two-three copper interface router with a fibre/copper transceiver. Cheaper, and just as fast! Wow!
     
  18. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Like I said Ogre, if I ever, EVER have a networking question, I know who to ask!

    [​IMG]
     
  19. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    orange and green = wtf
     
  20. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If you don't know what orange and green signify, you have no business building a commerical-grade network.






    ...which is why I don't build commercial grade networks. What do orange and green signify, anyway?
     
  21. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Network slang. A "three interface router" is quite common in small business networks, which is really how I treat this problem -- because it certainly isn't your typical home network.

    Red = Highest risk = WAN side. No reasonable expectation of security on this interface.

    Orange = Medium risk. You can mostly control this network via firewall ACL, etc, but it's publically-accessible. Usually contains servers.

    Green = Low risk. Non-routable IPs. Only inter-office use. Highly-controlled environment.
     
  22. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    lol @ orange / green, where did you learn this ass shit from.
     
  23. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Well, my I do believe I have said that I hold CCNA/CCNP certifications. I also believe I have demonstrated on this, and on several prior occasions that I am more than qualified in this field.

    You, however, have not demonstrated anything.

    And if you need any further examples of OTHER people using this "network slang" by all means take a look at the various linux-based router projects that exist. I know smoothwall makes very public use of this verbage.
     
  24. synthetic

    synthetic New Member

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    no ccie no care
     
  25. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Slurp his cum. Slurp it. Up for some felching?
     

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