Linux?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by JollyRoger, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. JollyRoger

    JollyRoger New Member

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    Sorry if someone has asked this before, but I've always been interested in Linux, but I was wondering, what are the main advantages of it? Is it too difficult to dual boot a system if someone like me just wants to screw around with it to see what its like?

    thanks :)
     
  2. kingtoad

    kingtoad OT Supporter

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    The only "advantage" I needed to switch over was one thing: open source.

    There's is a definate learning curve, especially in the beginning, and you will get frustrated at times. It's just a matter of sticking with the O/S and coping with the challenges that come instead of switching back to Windows when you get upset... like most people do.

    Start with an easy distribution like Ubuntu.
     
  3. RyanL

    RyanL OT Supporter

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    :werd:

    Ubuntu is great for that, they even have a live cd where all you have to do is throw it in and reboot. You can get that and then go from there.

    Like kingtoad said though, your best bet will be to force yourself to stick with linux and learn through the problems instead of simply rebooting.
     
  4. col_panic

    col_panic calm like a bomb Moderator

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    the more curious you are the more you will enjoy it - there is a lot to learn and if you are not used to unix it will take some adjusting. however, linux distros are far easier to install than they used to be, and the bootable distros like knoppix are a no brainer - just boot from the cd and you have a live system.

    a big advantage is the wealth of software written for linux. checkout

    http://freshmeat.net
    http://sourceforge.net/
     
  5. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    I love linux. I hated it with a passion for the first month or so but I stuck with it, changed distros 11ty billion times, and learned a ton in the process. I like ubuntu for just getting started...although having rpm's with red hat or fedora is nice. I use Damn Small Linux right now on my old ass laptop and it is awesome...runs from ram and supports my wireless card.
     
  6. Wolfden

    Wolfden :trance:

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    Kinda the same story here and DSL is a great distro for older machines. I don't know how many times it took to get gentoo installed properly but that is my favorite distro along with slackware.

    So many distros and so many disks I burnt, but I finally told myself to stick it out with what I have and I am glad I did.

    Huge advantage is no MS bullchit, second advantage is the savings $$ and the third advantage is, you end up with a better OS. Yes your gonna have to read and learn to break away from the fischer-price windows world.

    Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora, SUSE are usually highly recommended for people looking to try it out. Give a live cd a whirl, http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php has a list of live cds your can try out. Burn the iso - toss into cdrom - reboot computer and linux will start up. It's a great way to find out which distro likes your hardware the best.

    Good Luck
     
  7. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    With Ubuntu, there's very little learning curve. Of course, there's lots you can learn, but just to use it as a desktop, you don't have to learn much.
     
  8. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    I have to setup a Linux box soon because Windows won't do secure IM. Not on the server side, anyway. Not with compatibility with a good client.
     
  9. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    See my post about gajim in the other thread :embd:

    IMO, Gajim is a much better Jabber client than Gaim is. In fact, it's the best Jabber client I've found.
     
  10. Wolfden

    Wolfden :trance:

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    hmmmm Gajim looks interesting - have to give it a whirl
     
  11. JollyRoger

    JollyRoger New Member

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    I also have a laptop, will this make installing or using linux difficult?
     
  12. SPPaintball

    SPPaintball New Member

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    I like Ubuntu 5.10. I've been using it on a live cd I made for a while now.

    I finally decided to download and try DSL and SLAX.

    Ubuntu doesn't seem to like my wireless card though. :-\ Hopefully I'll have better luck with one of these.
     
  13. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    What wireless card is it? Ndiswrapper may support it.

    In the three installfests I've been a part of, we've done about 50 installs of SuSE and Ubuntu, most of which were on laptops. We had a few hardware issues (many more with SuSE than with Ubuntu, but it was over a year ago, so SuSE may have improved), but for the most part all the installs, including laptop installs, have been very successful and painless. Ubuntu has excellent hardware detection and support.
     
  14. SPPaintball

    SPPaintball New Member

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    It's a Linksys Wireless-B Model No. WPC11
     
  15. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    I have the WMP54G. It's a broadcom chipset, and broadcom won't release specs or code so there's no free driver. However, you can use the Windows drivers with ndiswrapper (http://ndiswrapper.sf.net).
     
  16. tony

    tony Guest

    Depends on your version of the WPC11. The older revisions use a Prism2 chipset, and the newer ones use a Realtek one (8081 i think)

    If you have the former, support for it is available in the kernel itself.
     
  17. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    or just buy an orinoco card and you'll be covered....
     
  18. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    But there are several different Orinoco cards, which can confuse a beginner if it doesn't automatically work. I never did get around to getting mine to work back when I had a dell and ran fedora core a couple years ago.
     
  19. SPPaintball

    SPPaintball New Member

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    So errr...

    Is there any way to use this so I can use the internet on the livecd?

    And also... After I download it, what do I do with it?

    Gah... I'm such a Linux noob. :wtc:
     
  20. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    According to the couple posts above yours, you may not need it.

    The livecd part makes it tough since presumably you can't install stuff. Any reason why you haven't just installed it if you like using it so much? Once it's installed, you just install ndiswrapper (though Synaptic), pop in the CD with the Windows drivers on it, go to the CD in a terminal and type 'sudo ndiswrapper -i <drivername>.inf' (where <drivername>.inf is the .inf file for the driver on the CD). Then you'll have the drivers for the card and you can load them up. It's a lot easier than it sounds.
     
  21. SPPaintball

    SPPaintball New Member

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    I probably will switch over soon. The last few days I've been backing everything up. (Pictures and stuff)

    Mainly, I just wanted to try the internet on the live cd first, to make sure that everything worked correctly. I've also been kind of nervous about drive partioning type stuff. Don't want to accidentally screw something up that will cause something to not work right if I switch back to Windows.

    But meh... What do I have to lose?

    Thanks for the help.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2005
  22. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    I'd suggest setting up a dual-boot setup. The Ubuntu installer makes this very easy (I think in Breezy/5.10 it's actually completely automated) since it can resize FAT and NTFS partitions.
     
  23. SPPaintball

    SPPaintball New Member

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    :bowdown:

    Alright. I think I'll try dual booting.
     
  24. monolith

    monolith My soul grows ever weary and the end is ever near. OT Supporter

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    I am going to try Ubuntu...so all I have to do is get the CD, put it in my CD-ROM, and restart my PC?

    Edit: I am d/ling the Ubuntu Live CD for 64 bit processors since this system I built is an Athlon 64...should be fun.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2005
  25. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Yup, to try the LiveCD all you need to do is put it in the drive and start it up, although you may need to edit your BIOS settings to boot from the CD. If you want to install it, just download the install disk and boot from that. It's a fairly easy install, no harder than Windows IMO.

    A cool thing that Ubuntu does is ship pretty pressed CDs for free. Just go to https://shipit.ubuntu.com/ and order as many as you like. The ones they send you are nicely-packaged sets containing a LiveCD and an InstallCD for whatever platform you like. I've already ordered some Breezy ones :bigthumb:
     

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