Linux or Solaris 10 on Ultra-SPARC server?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by EvilSS, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    I'm getting ready to build up a server I picked up. It's a Sun Enterprise 420R w/dual 450 Ultra Sparc-II procs, 2x18GB 15K SCSI drives, 2GB RAM.

    I've got a copy of Solaris 10, but I was wondering if anyone had a SPARC Linux distro they really liked.

    :wavey: SPARC PROCESSOR! NOT INTEL! DON'T SUGGEST UBUNTU!:wavey:

    ibinteldistroin3posts
     
  2. jmechy

    jmechy Calmer then you are.

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    you should install windows xp. ;)
     
  3. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Uh, yea. OK. If you can tell me how to do that, I'd be glad to try.
     
  4. jmechy

    jmechy Calmer then you are.

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    step 1: steal MS source code for XP
    step 2:
    step 3: profit!
     
  5. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    Debian :)
     
  6. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    I've seen Gentoo run swimmingly on a SPARC machine. That said, I really don't recommend Gentoo.

    I'd go with Solaris probably myself.
     
  7. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    You can run Linux (and probably already do) on anything. I think it would be maximally cool to have Solaris running on Sun hardware. When I was a teen, I used to DROOL over Sparc 20s. Jesus did I want one.

    Go with Solaris.

    What are you doing with it, anyway?
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Right now, it's a paperweight. Literally. It's a 70lb chunk of metal sitting on my desk. No idea what I'll do with it once it's built.

    After looking over the distros, I'm thinking Solaris too. Just wanted to see if anyone had a killer Linux distro for it. I haven't found one yet.
     
  9. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Me thinks the killer *nix distro for a Sun is gonna be Sun *unix... ;)
     
  10. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Don't let the Linux sack-riders her that or they will start pelting you with stuffed penguins and ubuntu CDs.

    I just wanted to see what the options were.
     
  11. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Oh yeah, I forgot. Linux is "ready for the desktop, and for the anal-probe..." even if you have to spend a day compiling libraries to install anything new. If you're serious about your anal probes... you'll do it.
     
  12. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Linux *is* ready for the desktop. It's been ready for my desktop for seven years, and is now ready for nearly everyone's desktop. I haven't had to compile a single thing since I installed Ubuntu.

    However, on Sparc hardware, it offers no advantage over Solaris.
     
  13. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    For home, maybe. For business, not a chance in hell. The OS is fine, the lack of business apps (like verticals, not Office or stuff like that) is what holds it back.
     
  14. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    True, there are some critical business applications that aren't mature yet. However, in Vienna they are switching many of the city employees to Linux workstations, so obviously for some business applications it works just fine.
     
  15. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Maybe they re-wrote what they need. The problem isn't off the shelf stuff, it's the verticals that are specific to this industry or that. Most are lucky if they can keep up with Windows OS upgrades, they will never manage to port to Linux or another platform as well.

    Of course, most also suck ass and there is a fortune waiting to be made replacing them, but that's another story.
     
  16. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    OpenOffice is everything that most businesses need...
     
  17. zero xeal

    zero xeal Guest

    oo you lucky basterd, I would drool over having a sparc box... or better an sgi
     
  18. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:


    :ugh:

    No, I mean real businesses. Real businesses need specialized financial packages, they need medical records keeping apps, or energy trading applications, or steel calculators, or marketing tracking and invoicing, or (TV) program scheduling apps, or (god forbid) ERP packages that integrate with EVERYTHING else they have...

    All that shit is usually written for windows.
     
  19. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Actually, by numbers... most businesses don't need any of those things. ;)

    :rofl: this guy lives in "everyone is a huge corporation" mode.
     
  20. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :werd:

    The company I work for is fairly large, earnings in the tens of millions per year range and profit probably in the millions. However, we're a paving company, so the computer part of the operation is fairly limited (only the relatively small number of people who work in the office have computers) and all that most of the computers are used for is email, some web browsing, writing quotes and doing estimates. If I worked there full time (I'm in school, so I only work there in the summer), I could easily switch 99% of the computers over to Linux. Most of the people there only need OpenOffice, Thunderbird and Firefox, although I would need to do a fairly easy porting of their estimating app. We may still need a few Windows computers for the odd person who does a bit of AutoCAD, plus the accounting department uses a Citrix-based accounting system, but that's about it.

    Oh, and many large-scale enterprise apps like those named above (energy trading, TV scheduling, medical records, etc...) are web-based these days anyway, so the OS of the client machines doesn't even matter.
     
  21. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    And not that I think Linux is as "ready-for-the-desktop" as alot of people here... but last time I checked (which was a month ago), the most common architecture for big, complicated, industry-specific enterprise applications was: J2EE. Which... what is it about Java again... someone remind me?

    :)
     
  22. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Yea, if they are web-based, why do I bill out at $130 to get them to work on Terminal servers? I've heard over and over again how the web would take over all these apps, yet every year, I don't see it. Vendors keep on promising their web version "any day now". heh..

    I've been in over 100 accounts of various size (from fortune 100 to 3 employees) over the last 6 years, almost ALL OF THEM have a windows based vertical of some sort. Those with in house development keep promising web based apps.

    I've seen maybe 20 apps converted to web-based, out of the hundreds I've dealt with over the years.

    So no, most of those apps are not web based these days.

    As for J2EE, most of the java development I've seen either won't run on anything other than windows (for older apps), or is one of those rare web-based apps.

    edit: And of the ones that ARE web-based, many are only developed to work on IE.
     

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