linux desktop load

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by hurleyint1386, Apr 9, 2005.

  1. hurleyint1386

    hurleyint1386 Someone has sand in their vagina

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    ok, so im just learning linux, so i installed mandrake 10.1 and i was learning some new stuff, so i decided to try to add "gaim" the the bottom of the .bashrc file to see if the system would boot and automatically load gaim, and it did. but now the rest of the desktop wont load. i cant get into the terminal, however i can press ctrl + alt + f1 to get into the tty. is there any way that i can edit the file throught the tty? remember, im still only learning linux
     
  2. Aimless

    Aimless Resident drunkey

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    Of course. Log in, you should be in your home directory.

    It depends on what editors you have installed, but you can try "pico .bashrc", "emacs .bashrc" or "vi .bashrc"

    Pico would be the easiest, but it's also the least likely to be installed. Type "man emacs" or "man vi" to figure out how to use the other two editors.

    I haven't used Mandrake in years, so if anyone else knows what they're talking about please correct me if there are alternatives.
     
  3. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    I think the default editor on Mandrake is VIM (vi), and if I'm not mistaken, it doesn't install emacs or pico by default. VIM is pretty easy to use once you figure out a couple of basic things, and it has a pretty good help command. If you just type vi (with no filename after it), it'll display some information on how to enter the help system, which will teach you how to use it.

    Also, if you want gaim to start automatically, .bashrc isn't really the best place to add it (since .bashrc will be run every time you open a new terminal window or invoke a script that uses bash). Adding it to the bottom of .login (or configuring gnome or kde, whichever you're using, to load it when it starts up) is a better idea.
     

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