Linux Crew: help me get into linux

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by jdog12, May 28, 2006.

  1. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    So i want to install and run linux so that i can learn a bit more about it, i need some advice though,

    1. what distribuition should i go with?

    i need to start off with something relatively easy.

    2. how should i partition my drives
    as of now i have a SATA drive and a IDE drive installed in the computer.. Windows xp is currently running off the IDE drive as i just installed the SATA drive. Pretty soon i willl be installing windows on the sata drive, and repartition the IDE drive, im thinkiing
    8gigs for linus ext3 partition
    1.5gig for linux swap partition
    2gigs partition for windows swap file(so that windows swap file will be on a diffferent drive and be faster, i will be using windows the most) and then use the rest of the drive for storage, maybe make a fat32 partition so i can share files between linux and windows

    3. do i need a seperate "boot" partition and another one for linux to install on?

    i plan on installing the boot manager to the second hard drive and then copying the boot sector off of it, and making an entry into my boot.ini and let windows be my boot manager.
     
  2. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    i did a little bit of searching and it seems as though Ubuntu is pretty popular and user friendly, but under platform, there is one that says i386, and one that says amd64, and i have an athlon 64. i am going for compatibility and ease of use, should i go for the i386 or the athlon64 one? i will probably end up downloading a linux distro rather than ordering it though.
     
  3. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    ubuntu was giving away cds a little while ago. i got 3, one for 64 bit, 32 bit, and mac. all of them came with full install cds and livecds.
    ubuntu is pretty decent, it's the typical linux install, just like suse linux and linspire (lindows). i have an athlon 64 also, i didn't notice any speed difference between the 32bit and 64 bit install, i believe it heavily relies on having 64 bit programs to show a difference in speed.
    i don't use it though, but what i do use it for is to connect to my cell phone with bluetooth to download pictures. for some reason, i can't do that in windows xp, but windows 2000 works fine and so does the ubuntu live cd
     
  4. motivez

    motivez New Member

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    Stick with the non 64 bit version of Ubuntu, there's still some problems getting programs to run properly on 64bit.
     
  5. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    i take it the live cd is if i just want to run it off the cd, and i will need the install cd to actually install it, im downloading the live cd to just try it out for a bit, if i like it i will d/l the install cd as well.
     
  6. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    yeah, the livecd means that it just runs off the cd. i don't think it messes with your hard drive at all.
    it's a great way of testing things out, just be aware that it will be slower because cds take a lot longer than hard drives.
    my dvdr drive wanted to blow up after an hour of using the livecd intensely
     
  7. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    yeah, i finished downloading the cd, burnt it, and booted it up, it even found my wireless card, im on ubuntu right now, but it wouldnt log on to my network, it was able to log onto a neighbors unprotected one though. it wont recognize my 2 screens though. i will probably download the install cd tommorow, and install it and play with it some more, it would be nice to get it to use both screens though.
     
  8. MAD PUNK inDC

    MAD PUNK inDC Sic Semper Tyrannis

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    5 gigs of swap? :hsugh:
     
  9. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    3.5..... 2 for windows, 1.5 for linux; how much swap space should i allocate? i have a gig of ram.
     
  10. Hydrogen

    Hydrogen building block

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    i am working on a ubuntu edu, just little info and links and pics to help people navigate and get used to the terminal, its going slow so i need some motivation.
     
  11. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    Ubuntu EDU would be nice :x:
     
  12. MAD PUNK inDC

    MAD PUNK inDC Sic Semper Tyrannis

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    well you shouldn't need a big swap partiction for something like what you are going. Maybe if you're running a really busy server or something, but I've seen mail servers at AOL running with less swap. What you want to do it pick your partition, and just let the partition editor make your swap partition for you. This will usualy be about 300-500mb. You really shouldn't need more, and you would be wasting drive space.
     
  13. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    *minimum* swap for a basic linux workstation should be 1024MB. It is not uncommon to follow the convention of "twice system memory", up to a reasonable amount. I wouldn't go past 4GB.

    Personally, I use a 2048MB swap file.

    Linux functions very differently from Windows. As where windows doesn't use all of your memory, Linux makes a big point to use EVERYTHING. Cache Cache Cache Cache, and then Cache some more.
     
  14. Shaggy007

    Shaggy007 New Member

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    Screw that noise, I use no swap partition at all. mwahahahahaahaahaha
     
  15. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    The usual guideline is that swap should be twice your RAM size.
     
  16. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    I've never used more than a gig of swap for Linux. I have a gig of RAM, and I hardly use any of my gig of swap.
     
  17. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    i have a gig of ram, maybe ill just use 1gig for the swap partition,

    do i need a seperate "boot" partition?
     
  18. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    need? no. should you have one? YES. I use 75MB for mine, and mount it "ro" (read only) unless I'm installing a new kernel.
     
  19. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :werd: This is by no means necessary, but is a very good practice to get into. It helps make your system more secure and prevents you from fucking things up. I use 50MB for mine, only 14MB is being used.
     
  20. jdog12

    jdog12 New Member

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    what exactly are the benefits of it though?
     
  21. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    security. Can't overwrite your kernel without intentionally mounting the /boot partition read/write. This can protect against your own accidental mistakes as well as malicious other parties. It also saves your boot partition from possible corruption of the main file system.

    Not to mention it allows you to run different partition types for /boot as opposed to /. For example, ext2 is the most common option for the /boot partition. However, ReiserFS has many merits that warrant people using it for their / partition. Seperating the two allows each to run on a different partition type -- suited well for each given task.
     
  22. MAD PUNK inDC

    MAD PUNK inDC Sic Semper Tyrannis

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    Has anybody actualy monitored the amount of swap that is actualy used on average? Put is this way, I used to monitor all the BEPs for the central reg at AOL, thats a huge system, bigger than anything you guys are going to run at home, and most likely bigger than what you will run into on the average job. If you remember about a year ago they started having problems randomly dropping 60k users at a time, well this was partialy because of the heavy amount of AIM and VoIP users forced so much traffic into the system that it couldn't handle it. Anyway those servers only used 4 gigs of swap, and on the average they would only use about half of that before they would core. Nobody here needs 5 gigs of swap partition, and for most of you 1 gig is more than you'll ever use.
     
  23. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :werd: I run ext3 for my /boot and XFS for my other partitions. I like to put /tmp on its own partition as well (/var is also a good one to do this for, although I haven't on my current system ... maybe I will soon) so that temporary things like log files full of error messages don't fill up an important partition.
     
  24. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    if you put /var on its own partiton you had better use a good logrotate!
     
  25. D1G1T4L

    D1G1T4L Active Member

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    get ubuntu
     

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