linksys wireless router, at&t cable modem & win2k iis server???

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Demo Dick, Jan 12, 2003.

  1. Demo Dick

    Demo Dick I will treat you all alike. Just Like Shit!

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    Anyone have any experience with this?

    I have calble here in atlanta through At&t broadband

    I have a new linksys wireless router wih 4 port onboars switch

    I have my xp machine & a win2k server running iis & every other thing you can imagine....

    can the linksys router do NAT or port forwarding so I can get a website going?


    Basically anyone know it the linksys will do it?
     
  2. tenchuninja

    tenchuninja Guest

    yes. forward port 80 (if your provider doesn't block it) to the server. make sure you keep up with the service packs/updates.

    edit: oh, wait. WIRELESS. :dunno:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2003
  3. Aimless

    Aimless Resident drunkey

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    Wireless doesn't make a difference... Regardless, I'm assuming he's running his server boxen through the 4-port switch. To answer the original question, like all the other SOHO routers it does both NAT and port forwarding.
     
  4. Demo Dick

    Demo Dick I will treat you all alike. Just Like Shit!

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    yes it is in the 4 port behind on the router...as for the service packs & such...win2k server administration is my job, so I have all that...routing & ip crap I am just now getting into

    I have port 80(http) forwarded to the internal address of my webserver 192.168.1.20 but i get nothing when I try to hit it from outside my network. I am thinking since I can not even ping my external address 24.98.108.58 that my isp may be blocking port 80
     
  5. Demo Dick

    Demo Dick I will treat you all alike. Just Like Shit!

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    p.s. thanks for teh help so far
     
  6. Demo Dick

    Demo Dick I will treat you all alike. Just Like Shit!

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    I am screwed!

    Filtering Port 80 Q&As

    Why is AT&T Broadband Filtering HTTP Port 80, and how Does Filtering that Port Prevent the Code Red Virus from Spreading?

    In an effort to alleviate the spread of the Code Red and Code Red II viruses on the AT&T Broadband High-Speed Cable Internet Network, AT&T Broadband is indefinitely filtering all incoming traffic on http port 80 for residential customers.

    Since the virus infects computers with the IIS Web server software and Window's NT or 2000 operating systems, the blocking of port 80 traffic is one of the first steps in containing the Code Red viruses on the AT&T Broadband networks. Containing the Code Red viruses will assist in restoring the AT&T Broadband Internet service to the standard our customers have come to expect.

    How does the Port 80 filter affect customers?

    Blocking of inbound port 80 traffic only affects residential customers that are hosting Web servers with their cable modem. Residential customers that subscribe to AT&T Broadband Internet Personal Web Pages and are not hosting a Web server are not affected by the filter.

    Are Customers Who Subscribe to AT&T Broadband Business Services Affected by the Port 80 Filter?

    The Port 80 filter only affects AT&T Broadband Internet residential customers.

    Why Can't AT&T Broadband Internet Residential Customers Run Web Servers?

    The AT&T Broadband Internet residential service offering is a consumer product designed for your personal use of the Internet. Customers must ensure that their activity does not improperly restrict, inhibit, or degrade any other user's use of the Services, nor represent (in the sole judgment of AT&T Broadband) an unusually large burden on the network itself.

    The benefits and privileges available from AT&T Broadband Internet, and the Internet in general, must be balanced with duties and responsibilities so that other customers can also have a productive experience.
     
  7. Kabuko

    Kabuko Guest

    What's the website for? If it's mostly for self-use, or a very few people you could just change the port.
     
  8. Demo Dick

    Demo Dick I will treat you all alike. Just Like Shit!

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    just to fuck around with & share some stuff with friends.....who knows
     
  9. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Just forward to port to something else, like 8080 or 8008..

    Unless AT&T does port scanning.. :dunno: I know RoadRunner here does.
     
  10. ancientpc

    ancientpc Guest

    I've using RR here in Austin and hosting a dev server off port 80 for over a year now, no problems. Then again it's extremely low traffic . . .
     
  11. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    They may not do port scanning where you are at. They do here, though.

    And the fact that you have very low traffic helps you out too... doesn't raise any flags for them or anything.
     
  12. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Yup, reset your IIS server to listen on a different port, direct that port from the router to the IIS and add :portnumber after the internet address in the web browser. They're probably just blocking :80 anyways - it's much easier to block a port than sniff packets and determine what kind of traffic is being transmitted.
     

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