A&P Light setup for shooting reflective obejcts? (Such as glass jars and bottles)

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by jinushaun, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    What's the general rule for this? I don't know what effect I want, but I definitely don't want overexposed in one area.

    Bad example:

    [​IMG]

    I had to use flash for these. :sad2: But you get the idea. It's too bright in spots. What do beer photographers do when they shoot their ads?
     
  2. Merli

    Merli gplus.to/merli OT Supporter

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    softboxes and/or diffusers
     
  3. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    I figure I'd need a softbox, but I don't own those. :sad2: Is a diffuser just a reflector? I actually tried using a reflector in those shots. :o Let's just say I didn't have enough time to properly set it up.
     
  4. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Jcolman in the other said you can put a handkerchief over the flash. Maybe you can try that and what happens
     
  5. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    I've used that technique before, but it's hard with a digicam with the built-in flash right next to the lens.
     
  6. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Ohh, a digicam. I'd try disabling the flash and use the tripod to take the beer bottles with long exposures.
     
  7. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    Yeah, but I'd like to add extra lighting so I don't have to use an obscenely long shutter speed.
     
  8. MastaCow

    MastaCow I love cup.

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    Tape a piece of kleenex over the flash?
     
  9. bosox

    bosox *

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    use lamps from either side
     
  10. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    You can still put a piece of paper or cloth over the flash even when it's next to the lens, but for shooting bottles, I wouldn't use flash.

    Here's an idea for a poor mans softbox.

    Go to the drug store and buy a while poster board. Cut it in half. Place your bottles near a window so the diffused window light falls on the bottle. Put a neutral to dark background behind the bottle. Don't have the bottle too close to the background, you need some depth here. Place half of the white poster board opposite the light from the window so that it will reflect the light into the bottle. Place the other half of the poster board near the lens. You may want to cut this piece into a thin strip. The idea is to have it reflect back in the bottle. I think you'll like the results.

    BTW, a diffuser and a reflector are not the same. A diffuser is placed over a light source to soften and spread the light. A reflector is used to bounce light into your subject.
     
  11. red^star

    red^star Guest

    If you hold a white notecard over the flash at such an angle that the flash will bounce off the card and hit the bottles you'll get a much cleaner flash.

    I had to learn this trick too because I can't afford a softbox :o
     
  12. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Lighting lesson # 3

    While this technique does indeed soften a flash, it will not produce the same results as a softbox. Bounce flash, as it is called, illuminates a large area as it spreads the light. This can produce unwanted light in areas where you don't want it. Additionally, it also diminishes the light output which means you have to use faster film or a larger aperature opening.

    A softbox will give you a nice diffused light but the light will be more directional and easier to control "light spill". Also, the light will be stonger which means you can use smaller aperatures and/or faster shutter speeds.
     
  13. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    Cool, thanks. :cool:

    Eh? :dunno:

    [​IMG]

    I've never used a softbox before, but I've studied some portrait photography. I usually see it place below the subject. :dunno:
     
  14. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    A softbox is usually placed where the window is in your illustration. The purpose of the softbox is to act as your key, or main, light. You can also place it next to the camera, but raised higher than the lens for nice portait lighting. The bounce card opposite the window is there to "bounce" light back into the shadow side. This is the same as a "fill" light.

    If your were to replace the bottle with a person, then the bounce card below the camera lens would work. The reason is that it would bounce some window light into the eyes and under the neck. If a person has deep set eyes this trick helps to get light into them. However, if you're lighting the bottle, you'd want the bounce card verticle, next to the lens, so that you'd actually see the reflection of the card in the bottle. You'd also probably want to cut the card into a narrow strip.
     
  15. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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