Let's Talk About Modelbob's Blood Clot Condition

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Mugwump, Jul 9, 2005.

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  1. Mugwump

    Mugwump Guest

    Robert's symptom: "His right arm had a pretty permanent pump after working out. Became abnormal. In the end, his heart was pumping tons of blood into his arm when he was working out, but it couldn't escape due to the blood clot."

    Diagnosis:
    "Progressive deterioration and hardening of the vein walls due to wide-range shoulder motions pinching his vein over the years, forming a blood clot. His right side is significantly lower than the one on his left side. Wide-range shoulder motions like those of chest flies, wide grip bench, lateral raises, and probably rear delt raises made his clavicle and top rib actually close on top of his subclavicle vein."

    Medication and Surgery: "Surgery on subclavicle vein. Removed 80% of the clot. Prescribed 'EBA' for blood thinning. Possible upper rib removal."

    In the End: "He won't be lifting weights, permanently. They think the increased muscle in the arms is what started the problem to begin with."

    --

    This scares the bejesus out of me because, like him, I'm a hardgainer who's managed to put on a decent amount of weight using some natural and some unnatural methods. I don't know what his height is or if this is hereditary. The only thing hereditary in my family is hair loss (ugh). I know that for, since I'm super tall, I have to watch out for collapsing lungs and other stuff. But this vein pinching shit. Crap!

    Has anyone ever heard of this happening before? And do you really think it could've been triggered by shoulder exercises?

    I feel really bad for him not being able to work out anymore. (Although, I'm sure he will be able to work out a little, just not for bulking.) The gym is my happy place, and I'd be really sad if someone told me I need to spend less time there for my own sake and health.
     
  2. TheMustafa

    TheMustafa hook 'em

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    i have to say that i think this is relatively uncommon and nothing you should be worried about.
     
  3. Mugwump

    Mugwump Guest

    I don't mean to sound selfish or paranoid for my own well-being. I'm honestly curious how the hell this would happen to somebody. It's tragic in a way, like "all that hard work" = "too much hard work."
     
  4. KetchupKing

    KetchupKing New Member

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    asprin??
     
  5. Sonic

    Sonic Live every day to the fullest, for yesterday is go

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    I wouldn't worry about it too much.
     
  6. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    i've never heard anything like that, short of guys who have seriously abused synthol
     
  7. TheMustafa

    TheMustafa hook 'em

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    Ok, i did some research, and the condition is called Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, named due to the fact that it involves shrinking of the outlet through which various vessels and nerves pass from the thorax into the arm. Its prevalence is estimated to be 10-15/1000 people.

    As we evolved from 4-legged to 2-legged positions, physiological changes caused the space through which the one main nerve bundle, the artery, and the vein that feed the arm to get smaller. Because of this, the muscles, bones, and ligaments that surround this space can pinch these nerves/vessels in certain circumstances. This is what happened to ModelBob.

    95% of the cases of this disorder involve the pinching of the nerve innvervating the arm. Symptoms include tingling, burning, numbness, and weakness in that arm (ie wont wont be able to do as much weight with that one arm all of a sudden). 4% involve the pinching of the artery that feeds the arm. Symptoms of this will be somewhat the same as the nerve being pinched. The arm will probably feel cold, and may be somewhat blue. Only 1% of the cases of this involve the vein, and symptoms include the same as if the artery were pinched, as blood flow is slowed, and localized swelling across the arm as fluid backs up into the arm. If you have this problem, you will always have pain and discomfort in one arm.

    Doctors can manipulate your posture and arm position in ways that can cause symptoms if you have this disorder, so diagnosis is relatively simple. Treatments mostly include special stretches and exercises to help open up this space. It is extremely rare that any surgical intervention is required. Typically, this includes stuff like removal of the blood clot, insertion of metal mesh stents within the vessel to reinforce it and keep it open, and removal of the top rib to allow more space.

    Everyone is somewhat physiologically different, so ModelBob may have been naturally more prone to developing this problem. Obviously, the severity of the problem he had is extremely rare. Typically it is not nearly as serious. However, it is more common with bodybuilders, as muscle hypertrophy can shrink this space to a certain degree.

    Take home message - This is rare, and if you do have symptoms, including numbness, tingling, cold/blue arm, swollen arm, and pain associated with only one arm, see a doctor, because it is easy to diagnose and fix with physical therapy. Nothing you should be worried about unless you feel symptoms.

    edit - damn that ended up being a long write-up
     
  8. Mugwump

    Mugwump Guest

    Thanks, Mustafa.
     
  9. tryfuhl

    tryfuhl New Member

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  10. Mugwump

    Mugwump Guest

    That's good news, and welcome back.
     
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