Legality of ripping CD's rented from the library

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by bigman7903, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. bigman7903

    bigman7903 OT Supporter

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    I have a buddy who says that it is perfectly legal to rip CD's for personal use that were rented from the library. I'm just curious if this is bullshit rumor stuff, or if it has merit.
     
  2. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    bullshit
     
  3. OT Addict

    OT Addict New Member

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  4. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    you're not going to convince him, but yes it's bullshit.
     
  5. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

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    Why would it be legal if you got it from the library? What an idiot.
     
  6. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

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    Only way its legal to rip a DVD is if you own it.
     
  7. cmsurfer

    cmsurfer ºllllllº

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    Not even legal if you own it... 9 times out of 10, you need to break the copy protection on a DVD to copy it.
     
  8. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

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    It's illegal to "rip" anything. If there is a security measure in place, you are not allowed to go around it. That's why it's there. If you were allowed to decrypt it they wouldn't go through the trouble of encrypting it and programs like DVDDecryptor would still be available.
     
  9. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    No.

    The only way it's legal to rip a DVD is it you own it AND it's not encrypted. If it's encrypted it's illegal to rip even if you own it.
     
  10. Doneranator

    Doneranator New Member

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    Just a thought (I too believe it's illegal) but if it were for a class would that fall under fair use? Like copying pages out of a book..:dunno:
     
  11. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Fair use only allows you to sample a work, not copy the entire thing. For example, you can copy pages from a book but you can't copy the entire book.

    This is assuming a CD (i.e. the subject of the thread). A DVD would be illegal to copy anything from if it was encrypted.
     
  12. bigman7903

    bigman7903 OT Supporter

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    yeah, i knew DVD's were a big nono

    he did a project on RIAA and all that stuff a couple years ago and told me that it was ok to duplicate them for personal use as long as they were from a public library, similar to taping a radio show
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Beat me to it.

    Federal law grants library patrons the right to copy any material therein for research use. That includes encrypted material, so long as the encryption is used to prevent unauthorized copying and not to protect classified information. It doesn't matter what the EULA for a DVD says about what you are allowed to do in this circumstance -- federal law trumps any and all personal contracts, though you can bet your ass that "no copying whatsoever" clauses (though by definition invalid) will be included to make the user believe they don't have the right to create research samples.

    It does not grant library patrons the right to copy any material therein for the purpose of owning a personal copy without having to pay for it.

    It would be legal for me to photocopy pages from Time magazine to use as citation material, but it would not be legal for me to photocopy pages from Time magazine so I could have Time magazine without having to pay for it. That's part of the reason that library photocopiers charge something like 100x the actual cost-per-page to use them.

    That said, the RIAA deals in material that is nearly effortless to reproduce in its original quality, so they tend to be overly sensitive to any copying whatsoever, whereas Time magazine could care less if people were to make black/white copies of news articles.
     
  14. bigman7903

    bigman7903 OT Supporter

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    Thanks, that makes alot of sense, although i may not be happy about it :mamoru:

    I was looking into making a nice trip to the library in the near future
     
  15. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    I don't think so.

    Last time I read DMCA it said it was illegal to break encryption. Period. For any reason. It did not make a distinction on reasons for copying, it just said breaking encryption was illegal.

    And since most DVDs are encrypted, most DVDs are illegal to copy even if you own it.
     
  16. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The intent behind the DCMA is to prevent piracy, not to prevent research. Any attempt to use the DCMA to punish someone for copying encrypted material for legitimate research purposes would get laughed out of court, and hopefully, mugged on the courthouse steps as well.
     
  17. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    DMCA used to prevent research when someone found a bug in UNIX
    http://news.com.com/2100-1023-947325.html

    DMCA used to prevent research when this guy found a way around adobe encryption
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitry_Sklyarov
    (yes he was released and charges dropped, but only in exchange for his testimony against his company)

    DMCA says you can not decrypt and you can not disseminate decrypted works
    http://news.com.com/2009-1081-954554.html

    There is a way to add exemptions in the DMCA but I don't believe they've actually been included
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/05/14/security_research_exemption_to_dmca/


    But then again, this says you're right and it's ok to break encryption in a VERY limited scope
    http://www.isoc.org/briefings/008/



    In short, it is illegal to copy an encrypted DVD (unless you're a researcher working on encryption, then it *may* be legal but it would still be illegal to then make a copy of the movie).
     

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