Left knee hurts after leg press..

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by BYGDK, Feb 25, 2007.

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  1. BYGDK

    BYGDK "It's nice to be important, but it's more importan

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    So.. on Friday I did 130 lb and 140 lb leg presses (5*5)..and soon after.. began to feel a pain/irritation in left knee.. and I still feel it even now..

    Have you guys had this pain before? I have had this in the past, and i started to place my feet higher on the leg press board..as I heard this may help relieve the pain on the knee.. but even this doesnt seem to be helping..

    Thanks!
     
  2. cardiba151

    cardiba151 OT Supporter

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    Where is the pain exactly? Bottom of th knee? Top? Inside/Outside of the knee?
     
  3. ccrooks

    ccrooks New Member

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    i get pain in the outside/back of my knees often.. esp. after biking... thoughts?
     
  4. wtf

    wtf New Member

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    did you go past 90 degrees?
     
  5. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    .
     
  6. ~stangzorized~

    ~stangzorized~ New Member

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    in the knee :mamoru:
     
  7. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Not harmful.
     
  8. BYGDK

    BYGDK "It's nice to be important, but it's more importan

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    I would say it is right below the knee.. middle I guess..right below kneecap...
     
  9. Canuckistan

    Canuckistan New Member

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    Is the paint so bad you can't continue or its hard to walk on?

    ...also wondering if locking out is bad lol
     
  10. BYGDK

    BYGDK "It's nice to be important, but it's more importan

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    When I walk, it is noticeable... but it doesnt prevent me from walking or anything..it is not very painful.. but just noticeable..more like an irritation.. not sure..

    i bet i could probably do the leg presses, but i am wondering if that would make the pain worse.. :sadwavey:
     
  11. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    myths are bolded


    (Mel Siff, Facts and Fallacies of Fitness)

    Never lock the knees completely during any standing exercise

    So many aerobics instructors and personal trainers believe this fallacy that we should conclude that human beings outside the fitness centres who lock their knees during normal daily activities such as walking and lifting are misshapen mutants. Presumably they recommend this so as to minimise the risk of knee injury. Somehow, the fact that knee locking is done during many daily tasks and even very intensively with huge loads by Olympic weightlifters and powerlifters without any injury is ignored.

    These same instructors say nothing about shock absorption and stabilisation at the ankle, metatarsal and hip joints, which are all involved in any movements of the lower extremeties. Nor do they say anything about the fact that rotation about the knee is impossible unless the knee is flexed, which in some dynamic actions (such as sudden internal rotation or valgus) can result in serious damage to the knee. This sort of injury commonly occurs in the slightly bent knees of soccer players during quick turns or tackles. There is a time for locking and a time for flexing and a single blanket rule for all situations is unwise.


    It is easy to hyperextend the knees by locking them with your muscles

    The entire concept of hyperextension is far too casually applied. Accurately speaking, the term refers to an action which extends any joint beyond its normal extreme of range, where normality is determined by the action of the relevant muscles in executing the extension. Even maximal muscle contraction in vigourous overhead Olympic jerks or push presses with heavy loads does not force the healthy knee into hyperextension, so it is highly unlikely that the average client will ever be able to produce even greater forces of extension than the world's strongest lifters. One cannot hyperextend the healthy knee joint by muscle action alone. Only if additional force is provided by momentum of an already moving limb or an outside agency does this become more likely. Naturally, if the cruciate ligaments are very lax or damaged, the risks of hyperextension under normal muscle action increase significantly.


    It is harmful to lock the knees completely during squatting or aerobics

    This was discussed earlier, but a few more words need to be added. Many clients complain that the medial head of their quadriceps (vastus medialis) is underdeveloped or that they are suffering from chondromalacia patellae (or patellofemoral pain syndrome), yet it is concerted action of vastus medialis which offers a solution to both of these problems. Muscularly controlled knee locking poses no problems for the knee, especially if the locking is performed more slowly during the last few degrees of extension.


    It is dangerous to lock the knees at the end of a squat

    If the squat is performed with muscular control throughout the movement, with no vigorous locking or hyperextension of the knees at the end of the range, it is just as safe as partially completed squats. The latter squats, by the way, tend to decrease the involvement of vastus medialis and may produce unbalanced development of the quadriceps. This imbalance is often associated with the painful condition known as chondromalacia patellae or peripatellar pain syndrome. This is also one reason why bodybuilders and physique trainees often do not adequately develop the inner quads. They invariably have to do additional 'leg extensions' with legs externally rotated to cope with this deficiency. Remember, of course, that uncompleted leg extensions also will neglect vastus medialis. In summary, unlocked knee squats probably produce more detrimental long-term effects than well-controlled knee-locking squats. In fact, even better training effects may be had from squats in which you isometrically contract the quadriceps at the end of each locked repetition. The main danger of locking the knees during the squat lies in forceful or ballistic locking of the knees at the top of the movement, so, if you avoid such actions, you may very well do full squats without risk.
     
  12. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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  13. jessb20hatch

    jessb20hatch Let's bang like Myosin & Actin

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    IT band stretch
     
  14. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    questions:


    is it ok to leg press on the balls of your feet?
    How deep should you be going in terms of the angle of your legs?


    I tend to go really deep and also i push with the balls of my feet because it gives my calves some stimulation and also it doesn't hurt my knees at all... i know that for squats you want your weight on the hells, but since leg pressing is a different movement is this not the case?
     
  15. BYGDK

    BYGDK "It's nice to be important, but it's more importan

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  16. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    yes
     
  17. ccrooks

    ccrooks New Member

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    ... go on...
     
  18. kit99bar

    kit99bar USPA Class 2, weak, old man!

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    Locking out is when you make your leg totally straight. a lot of peopel think that puts pressure on the knee.

    :bowdown: to Ceaze's knowledge!

     
  19. forum95

    forum95 Come see bout us OT Supporter

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    i recommend knee sleeves
     
  20. BYGDK

    BYGDK "It's nice to be important, but it's more importan

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    Cool yah I found that out on google a little while ago.. I will be more careful tonite..and hopefully I dont injure myself further.. :bash:
     
  21. jessb20hatch

    jessb20hatch Let's bang like Myosin & Actin

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    b/c it hurts when you bike = lots of hip flexion
    I would guess that your tensor fasciae latae which does hip flexion is tight causing your iliotibial band to be tight and make painful friction...good place to start with outside knee pain...try this stretch plus you should incorporate this into your stretching b/c you do bike so much

    [​IMG]
     
  22. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    why would they purposely draw a bald spot on a stretching illustration
     
  23. jessb20hatch

    jessb20hatch Let's bang like Myosin & Actin

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    lol, i have no clue
     
  24. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Foam rolling works good on the IT band, or a lacrosse ball if you're hardcore.
     
  25. forum95

    forum95 Come see bout us OT Supporter

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    nigga take me off your aim block list :rofl:
     
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