Laptop battery question

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by TysonLee, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. TysonLee

    TysonLee New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Messages:
    18,500
    Likes Received:
    0
    i use my laptop all day at work (meaning its on all day at work. i am not always on it). my question is, is this bad for the battery if i have it plugged in all day? i think i remember reading somewhere that i should have the battery out when its gonna be plugged in for long periods of time.
     
  2. DAN513

    DAN513 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Messages:
    10,089
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    204
    it's not as much of an issue with current laptops that have lithium ion batteries, but with the old nimh or nicad batteries, they would build up a memory and not hold a charge for long. It's still a good plan to run it on battery till it dies once in a while.
     
  3. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    Uh, no it's not a good idea. Lithium batteries are like car batteries, they have a limited number of discharge/recharge cycles before they croak. Lithium batteries do not suffer from the memory problems of previous rechargeables but they do weaken each time they are discharged. So the only thing letting the battery run out is going to do is shorten its already meager life.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's always bad to constantly recharge any kind of battery. More expensive laptops will cut off the A/C power to the battery once it's charged, but the cheaper ones just constantly feed electricty in, which will eventually cause the cells to leak and short out.

    Easy rule for remembering which kinds of batteries need to be drained and which don't:

    "If it starts with an "L", Leave a Little charge. If it starts with an "N", you Need to discharge it."

    (in other words, lead and lithium should never be drained completely. ni-cad and NiMH should always be drained before recharging.)
     
  5. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    Actually with Lithiums the batteries themselves handle the charging. Overcharging (or undercharging) them is a very very bad thing. So to make sure they don't explode (or...um..to try to; sorry Sony, my bad) they put the charging control logic on the battery itself.
     
  6. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

    Joined:
    May 6, 2000
    Messages:
    52,499
    Likes Received:
    311
    Location:
    Northwest Mejicooooooo
    Which is why its a good reason to buy good quality lithium batteries. You never know if that $2 battery off eBay is really going to protect itself properly.
     
  7. TysonLee

    TysonLee New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Messages:
    18,500
    Likes Received:
    0
    so i have a Dell Inspiron 9300...what is the best course of action for my battery?
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    Leave it in, take it out, does not matter. Just leave it charged most of the way up when you store it. The support forums at dell.com has a forum just for batteries and there is a ton of info there on the care and feeding of your battery.
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Only if they have a built-in charge regulator. Most do, but some smaller batteries don't. Not in general, anyway; probably all modern laptop batteries have charge regulators.
     
  10. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    All rechargeable LiO batteries have them. Cell phones, laptops, cameras, etc all have the circuitry built in. The battery companies won't trust the electronics makers to due it for them, way too much liability with a battery that is composed of a flammable electrolyte and very reactive metal.

    The only exception to this is some poly Li's that are not removable, such as those used in the iPods, but the battery companies probably designed the circuit, it's just not bundled in a plastic shell with the battery.
     

Share This Page