GUN landing a job in the firearms industry?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Possum Stomper, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. Possum Stomper

    Possum Stomper The Great Bird of the Galaxy

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    anybody have any information on what kind of jobs are avaliable in the industry, and how hard it is to get into them, and what they pay?

    i know the question is really vague, but something to do with ballistics testing, or product development and testing, or even crime scene stuff.

    i'll take info on anything and everything
     
  2. JonDaAzn

    JonDaAzn New Member

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    you could look into gunsmithing, AFAIK ballistics testing is a very small community
     
  3. oakie

    oakie my ninja.

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    go to a recognized trade school, or if you're lucky, there's a local gunsmith who does quality work in your area that is willing to take on an apprentice. excellent way to get into smithing. it is also going to be one of the few trades left dealing with firearms as restrictions will only get tighter, and old guns will eventually have to be made "new" again.

    if you're into the law enforcement side of firearms, you'll need a post secondary education from an accredited school to begin with.

    if you're into writing, get a journalism degree and start sucking for an internship with a major publication.

    if you want to work for a manufacturer, check out their websites and apply with them. I know SIGArms is hiring in a few different departments right now. great opportunity if you live in Exeter, New Hampshire.

    you can run guns for a distributor... there are a lot of middlemen, just like in any other retail business.

    as far as ballistician or metallurgist, like some of the other avenues, you need education first.

    an "all else fails" approach would be to get a job at a local gun range or gun shop. most are family owned operations with a "good ol' boy" policy, but if they're lookin to hire, they're lookin to hire someone who is knowledgeable of firearms and basic safety, can and will defend themselves and others, can follow basic instructions as labeled on the firearm transfer paperwork, is TRUSTWORTHY, and is able to get along with a wide range of customers. most gun shops offer smithing or at least basic repair work... which can help you get a foot in the door when it comes to smithing. shops that cater to LE will help you get to know local LE who may be able to help you get a foot in the door doing LE related work.


    my first job was working at a local gun shop when i was 15. got to do a lot of testing as we were a major supplier for the local police force, and a lot of repair work as out gunsmith was a great "people person" but had a shitty work ethic... i learned well from him, but started doing repair work in-house instead of sending it out to him. also got into the USPSA/IPSC shooting arena and got a taste of tuning race guns, which helped afford me my own limited race gun to compete. a great opportunity...

    but it was the first time i had ever been shot at, too. :hs:
     
  4. eWRXshun

    eWRXshun hai

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    i was wondering somewhat the same question the other day. what kind of degree would be beneficial in having a career doing ballistics work either in a crime lab or for testing?

    criminology for the former and general mathematics for the latter?
     
  5. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    I've passively been trying to get on with FATS for a while. When my best friend gets his range built and up and running this summer, I'll be working there. What jobs you could do would depend entirely on your experience in customer-relations, firearms, and various other fields. A lot of times, it does help to know people, but it also helps to actually get out there and contact the companies around you and ask them for a job. They may tell you no, but what does it hurt?
     
  6. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot MINDSET

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    Go to the SHOT show next year and whore yourself out.
     
  7. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    Yeah, I didn't think of that. That's a sure way to get started.
     
  8. Possum Stomper

    Possum Stomper The Great Bird of the Galaxy

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    don't you have to already be in the industry to go to a SHOT show?

    what kind of secondary education is suited to ballistics and lab testing, mostly engineering i would assume?
     
  9. What kind of jobs are open to metallurgical engineers in this industry?
     
  10. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    I'm sure you could examine the failure of parts and stresses and what not :dunno:
     

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