Lactic acid is a muscle fuel

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Sonar_un, May 16, 2006.

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  1. Sonar_un

    Sonar_un Prowler Orange

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  2. Elfling

    Elfling New Member

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    It doesn't quite work like that though..Your main muscle fuel is still glycogen, and you can only re-use so much lactic acid before you reach your LT.
     
  3. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    [Siff, Supertraining 2003 pp. 77-78]

    Contrary to popular belief, lactate is not a toxic by-product or waste-product of metabolism accelerated by exercise. Lactate is produced even under conditions of rest and actually can serve as a valuable extra substrate (or source) of energy. When sufficient oxygen again becomes available via rest or decrease in exercise intensity, lactate is reconverted to pyruvate for use as an energy source. In addition, the lactate and pyruvate formed in muscle during exercise can be used to manufacture glucose by gluconeogenesis in a process known as the Cori cycle. This supplements any existing blood glucose and muscle glycogen.

    Moreover, muscle fatigue is not due to 'lactic acid poisoning' of the muscles. The formation of lactate (or lactic acid) is accompanied by the presence of positively-charged hydrogen ions (H+) or protons. These electrical charges, which increase the acidity of the blood, can interfere with the muscle contraction process and the efficiency of the enzymes involved in energy production. Neither should lactic acid be regarded as the cause of muscle soreness, since blood lactate levels return to normal within an hour or so of strenuous interval training.
     
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