GUN Kansas prosecutors could be armed in court

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by twistid, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Messages:
    40,767
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    The Kansass/Oklahomo Border
    Kansas: Concealed carry bill would let prosecutors be armed in court


    Reno County prosecutor Thomas Stanton says decades of holding dangerous, unpredictable felons to account for crimes sometimes triggered death threats that left him feeling vulnerable. Stanton said he would carry a concealed firearm for defensive purposes, but a 2006 law forbids federal, state and county prosecutors from packing that kind of firepower in a courtroom and other special locations.

    http://www.nraila.org/News/Read/InTheNews.aspx?id=12021

    Plan would expand gun law
    Concealed-carry bill would let prosecutors be armed in court
    By Tim Carpenter
    The Capital-Journal
    Published Wednesday, January 21, 2009
    Reno County prosecutor Thomas Stanton says decades of holding dangerous, unpredictable felons to account for crimes sometimes triggered death threats that left him feeling vulnerable.

    "We act to insure those who violate the laws of Kansas receive consequences for their actions," the deputy district attorney said. "This can lead to prosecutors being targets of violent acts perpetrated by defendants, their families and their friends."

    Stanton said he would carry a concealed firearm for defensive purposes, but a 2006 law forbids federal, state and county prosecutors from packing that kind of firepower in a courtroom and other special locations.

    A bill before the full Senate would extend to prosecuting attorneys who are Kansas conceal-and-carry permit holders an opportunity to obtain additional training at the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center. If supplemental training was completed, the prosecutor working in Kansas would be viewed more like a law enforcement officer in terms of locations a concealed weapon could be taken.

    Sen. Derek Schmidt, R-Independence, chief sponsor of the bill passed by the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the rationale was simple.

    "Prosecutors deal with the same group of often-unsavory characters that law enforcement officers deal with," he said. "They have personal safety issues that are more similar to those of law enforcement officers than those of most other citizens."

    The legislation was amended to include Attorney General Steve Six among those eligible for the special conceal-and-carry status.

    Richard Delonis, president of the National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys, said the Kansas legislation had the association's endorsement. The organization represents 5,300 assistant federal attorneys, including 50 working in Topeka, Wichita or Kansas City, Kan.

    He said judicious placement of firearms in the hands of trained personnel was a proven method of countering threats posed to courtroom litigators.

    "It is narrowly and reasonably crafted, yet desirably promotes and expands the assurance of public safety," Delonis said.

    Jerome Gorman, district attorney in Wyandotte County, said the bill was needed because prosecutors assigned to "hot" courtrooms with a docket of serious cases endured the risk of personal harm each day.

    "Felony prosecutors in Kansas should be permitted the possession of firearms and the authority to carry firearms concealed from public view whenever they might be in harm's way, which is in any place and at any time," he said.

    Gorman and Stanton said the bill should be amended to allow employers to pay for the firearms training of prosecutors. The legislation says the cost must be paid by the individual.

    In addition, Gorman said dual-training requirements in the bill might be excessive. Training of prosecutors shouldn't be more burdensome than mandates applied to full-fledged law enforcement officers, he said.

    Tim Carpenter can be reached at (785) 296-3005 or [email protected]


    http://cjonline.com/stories/012109/sta_379727801.shtml
     
  2. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,640
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Merced Co., CA
    In the courtroom...Where there's already going to be at least one (armed) bailiff?

    I'm torn here. On the one hand, more carry = more chances for bad guys to get shot. I like that. Especially when good people are doing the shooting, and even more so when they're not in some BS trouble for it.

    On the other hand, bringing a firearm into a place where you know there are bad guys, and it's not in a retention holster, and you might not have practiced weapon retention.....well, action is faster than reaction, and to a felon or a guy who's about to go away for a long time, a courtroom is loaded with targets of opportunity.

    Have to say, though with a touch of possible reservation, that it's still a good thing to allow more people, especially people whose connection to LE/Mil is slightly more tangential, to carry in more places.
    Ideally, someday the whole nation will be 100% CCW and OC without permits, and 922 will be repealed, etc etc etc....
    But every step along the way, even a tiny one like this, is a good thing.
     
  3. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Messages:
    40,767
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    The Kansass/Oklahomo Border
    every little bit adds to the greater good... i think our governor has learned her lesson, so it should pass her desk if it makes it there.
     
  4. Admitted

    Admitted I shouldn't be on OT right now.

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    7,516
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lawl School
    I'm all for it. As someone who intends to enter lawl school very soon, I wish I was able to carry into court. If not, at least check it at the entrance to court. I'd be a little weary of an unsavory character approaching me after a lawlsuit.
     
  5. FusionZ06

    FusionZ06 /\__/\__/\__0>

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    86,918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sunshine State
    .
     
  6. Soybomb

    Soybomb New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    Messages:
    9,041
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    Last year there was a shooting during a city council meeting in Kirkwood (st louis), MO. MO has concealed carry but doesn't allow it in gov buildings. A nut shot one police officer in the parking lot and then the police officer that was present in the meeting room (and took his gun) before killing 3 other people.

    I'm not sure that relying on 1 or 2 armed people is wise, it seems like often they're just the "shoot me first" people.
     
  7. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Messages:
    40,767
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    The Kansass/Oklahomo Border
    we're just starting to become gun friendly, after our dem governor got her veto overturned... she seems to go with the flow now.
     
  8. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

    Joined:
    May 16, 2001
    Messages:
    18,944
    Likes Received:
    0

    Were I a betting man considering your average bailiff/court officer vs a prosecutor who voluntarily took the time and effort to get both his carry permit and the additional training to carry in court, I would put my money on the prosecutor being a lower risk for a grab.
     
  9. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,640
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Merced Co., CA
    Which I neglected to mention in my bit, that a prosecutor carrying concealed probably has a relatively low risk of a grab--so long as nobody figures out that he's packing unless s/he needs to use it.

    I know some, that's a few, not all, bailiffs who actually put in some time and effort, and some who have the benefit of 20+ years on the street before becoming a bailiff.
    In this county, bailiff duty falls to normal deputies, frequently as part of a duty rotation. Some have done their time on the streets, some are working their asses off to get to the streets, and some are using it as a cushy place to not attract attention, try to make 20 or 30 years comfortably without risking real work, and retire.

    I dislike the last category.
     

Share This Page