GUN Kaboom!

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by thegooch, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. thegooch

    thegooch OT Supporter

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  2. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    well we can eliminate partially unsupported chamber and polygonal rifling fouled with excessive lead cause over pressure (glock, hk usp). Those are great pictures you can see the scorch mark of where the case failed. My guess is it was either a massise case failure (cracked brass), or a double power charge. It probably was both to get a kB that big. Awesome.
     
  3. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    No, no, it's entirely probable that two pieces of metal made at totally different points in the manufacturing process of an ISO rated company failed catastrophically at the same time.

    10 years handloading experience > *
     
  4. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    double ignition is very possible too. There are certain powders such as titegroup that will not double ignite. Generally the fast powders are pretty good good about this. It's the slow powders that can be a problem.

    I have heard that in the old days before powders like tight group they used to make foam plugs that the jammed in to compress the powder up against the primer to take up the dead space. Then they load the bullet on top of that to prevent a double ignition (some cowboy action shooters might still do this.)
     
  5. The obvious solution is to only shoot cartridges where you have to pack the powder in.
     
  6. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    well in reloading you really can't generalize. You have to research and test all your loads. While using a compressed load will generally eliminate double ignition, you trade that for over pressure. Where compressed loads can be trouble is if you mix bullets. Say you shoot a compressed 9mm load with a 115 bullets. Say 8.9 grains of HS6. Then you accidently get a 147 grain bullet or 124 grain bullet mixed in there.

    What it comes down to is even if you have a safe load you have to watch every round you make as your reloading. I look down into the case and visually check the powder level as I'm cranking on the dillon. You have to inspect the brass for crack too. If you reload you have to do your due dilligence.
     
  7. My comment was tongue-in-cheek.
     
  8. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    Every manufacturer has incidents of failure in their ammunition. You rarely hear about it, because it rarely happens. For someone to think that their reloading skills are infallible because they've reloaded 50,000 rounds is crazy. Remington and Winchester each load MILLIONS of rounds at a time, and still have rounds that produce catastrophic failures.
     
  9. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    It's not the number of rounds you reload it's your own quality control. Some of the best reloads are those done on a single stage press in small batch. Primerily because there is just more quality control.

    Not sure what your getting at?
     
  10. TheHunter

    TheHunter Unprofessional Lurker

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    Think what he's saying is that no matter how good the QC it's still possible for something to fuck up. Unseen weakness in brass, issues with the powder itself, etc.

    Hell, I've seen a MK19 round go off as soon as it was fired- crew got blown up but lived. Round isn't supposed to arm until like 13 revolutions, but shit happens.
     
  11. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    :mamoru: Who ever told you that is wrong, Mk19 Grenades are simple PIBD Fuse. Wanna test it out take a hammer and smash the front of a Mk19 Grenade and well I guess you wont be reporting back but you get the picture
     
  12. TheHunter

    TheHunter Unprofessional Lurker

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    /sigh. Always a clown in the class. Yes it has a pibd fuse, but look up the patent yourself on that particular fuse PIBD M549 for the HEDP round. It's not armed for contact detonation until 18-30 meters. It uses a centripetal switch to arm it for detonation- hence the 13 revolution rule.

    But I still won't test out the hammer theory- watching one blow the hell up was enough fun without wanting to know what it was like.
     

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