Just got a punching bag *need help with a routine*

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by iCEgECKO, Mar 21, 2006.

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  1. iCEgECKO

    iCEgECKO Ballin' at 5'2''

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    I'm 5'4'' weighting in at 175lbs. I'm definitely overweight and i've been looking for a way to lose weight and i though a punching bag would do me good, even installing it was a workout.

    Anyways, i was wondering if someone could recommend a workout routine? My goal is to lose atleast 1 pound every 2 weeks till i get down to about 150 lbs.

    and if there any martial artists or boxers, i'm right handed and i'm having trouble throwing my left with consistency, i know i can throw a good punch but i'm having trouble keeping my wrist strong and steady, i'm definetly going to go out and buy some striking gloves to help even things out.

    I took pictures of myself today in my boxers and i'll post up pics in a month or 2 if there is in any progress. Which there will be :mad:.
     
  2. Kozzy McKoz

    Kozzy McKoz OT Supporter

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    you could probably lose 1-2 pounds a week actually.

    lift weights too
     
  3. iCEgECKO

    iCEgECKO Ballin' at 5'2''

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    I'm pretty strapped for cash, so i cant join up to the gym just yet, i'm thinking about just buying some weights in a week or 2 after my pay check.

    Any recommendations on weight? adjustable? and what to do with them?
     
  4. darkostoj

    darkostoj NEEEERRRRDDDDSSSS

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    with a barbell, weights, and a pullup bar you can do just about anything.

    Read through the archives, lots of good info there.

    When I was boxing I had a timer that would time rounds. I started off at a 1/2 round with 45 seconds rest, and eventually got up to full rounds with 30 second rests.
     
  5. siniquezu

    siniquezu New Member

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    Since you're in toronto, hire timber :big grin:
     
  6. emanuel

    emanuel OT Supporter

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    this a quality F&N noob post. thank you.
     
  7. houseofdon

    houseofdon Simplify Moderator

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    I bought a heavy bag last summer and did almost exactly the same thing. Felt like a great cardio workout, and an amazing stress reliever. I could definitely feel a lot more zip on my punches after hitting the bag for only a few weeks.
     
  8. k9style

    k9style Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the sou

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  9. iCEgECKO

    iCEgECKO Ballin' at 5'2''

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    Thanks i guess, i've been reading these threads for a while to know not to make a 'Help me lose weight' thread.

    Thanks.
    This is the website i've used for most of my boxing resources so far. Its pretty good, the instructional sample videos are key. :bigthumb:


    From what i've learnt i'm going to try out the 3 sample routines they have set up.

    Workout 1.
    4 x 3-minute rounds – Skill emphasis
    4 x 30-second punch-out drills
    Finish with 1 x 3-minute round

    Workout 2.
    3 x 3-minute rounds – Skill emphasis
    4 x 1-minute power boxing
    5 x 30-second punch out drills

    Workout 3.
    10 x 1-minute power boxing
     
  10. GTLifter

    GTLifter Banned

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    the subforum called "The Cage" might be a better location for advice on your striking issues.

    Since you cant join a gym you can do stuff like pushups,pullups (find a tree), chair dips and BW squats. When your body adjusts to the weight of yoru body begin doing the exercises with a backpack with weight added on your back.

    I suggest figuring out a way to join a gym ASAP though. Cut back on the beer, use your schools gym, local YMCA, etc. It is possible you jsut have to figure it out.
     
  11. ices

    ices New Member

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    I've been boxing for several years now, so here's my 2 cents:
    -You probably already know this, but if you're right handed, your stance should be with your left hand forward. Your left jab should be straight out, straight in. No coming from under the jaw, or over the shoulder. Straight in, and straight out, the shortest and most efficient movement. Make sure you pull your punches, meaning that you don't follow through. Your left jab is not meant to be powerful. It's more of a "measuring stick" to find out the style, reflexes, etc. of your opponent.

    -Your right straight should be like it's traveling down a hallway. It's thrown from your right by your chin, and should go straight to an opponent. Since you're 5'4", you should practice throwing a couple inches up if you're planning on sparring or taking your boxing further.

    -Your form on hooks is a little more complicated. You should get someone to illustrate, or look for a little more illustrated instruction. Basically, you want the side of your body to move with your arm. Make sure you keep your arms as parallel as possible, your elbow at a stiff 90 degrees or so, and twist the ball of your foot with the movement of your upper body.

    -Make sure that if you're not throwing a punch, make sure that your hands are always covering your face. Don't block body shots by swatting with your hands, just tuck your elbows in and lean to that side. A couple hits to the face with a sparring partner won't let you forget.

    -Make sure you never square up to your opponent. Always keep your left foot forward so your body is slanted. It makes your body a smaller, harder to hit target. It also allows for you to protect your face with mostly your left hand.

    -Don't concentrate too much on punching. You need to learn proper footwork, and how to "dance" around your opponent naturally, without tripping over your feet. The basic idea is that you want to avoid ever crossing your feet, step with your leading foot in that direction. For example, if you want to step to you right, step with your right first, then slide over with your left.

    -Your left uppercut should be for distance to catch your opponent off guard, while your right uppercut should be when you're close inside. People make the mistake of trying to throw them interchangably, and end up squaring up to their opponent and leaving huge openings.

    -When you're stance and form are second nature to you, start practicing combos. 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2-low3-high3, 1-2-5-step4, etc. for the whole round.

    -My advice would be to add the burn out drills to the end of a drill. It's akin to weight lifting where you're getting in that last rep. The burn out is much more bearable if it's the "last stretch" before the round ends, which it should be. This also gives you an option as to what your burn out drills should be; whatever combos you were doing, or just the 1-2 combo as fast as you can.

    I would start out with this routine:

    Round 1-
    Practice your 1-2 combo. Step in, throw a quick 1 with a strong 2, and step out, then dance around a little. Practice your form, and fine tune how powerful you want each hand to be.

    End with a burn out.

    Round 2-
    Learn to dance around the bag while throwing jabs. Lots and lots of jabs. Jabs are one of the most important punches. It may not be powerful, but it tells you alot about your opponent, and keeps you at a distance. You need to learn how to use your left hand. There's no way around having just a powerful right and a useless left (I used to be this way before I started boxing). Occasionally throw a hard right straight, but keep moving. For every 5-10 jabs, throw 1 straight. Remember that the jab and straight should not be used with the same frequency. The straight is more a punch of opportunity, and should require a huge burst of energy. Practice this. Make sure you keep your hands up, and your shoulders should be burning by the end.

    End with a 1-2 burn out

    Round 3-
    Practice your left and right hook. Make sure you get down the right form before you practice. Mix it up with combos, 1-2-3, 1-2-3-2, 1-2-low3-high3. Make up your own combos. Try getting in close to the bag and throwing repetitive 3-4. Your box should sway side to side, and you can use that motion to practice your foot work.

    End with a 1-2 burn out

    Round 4-
    Just throw as many efficient punches as possible. Punching improvised combos should be second nature. Have someone on the side calling out random numbers, or put your gameface on and pretend you're boxing for your life. A good boxer should be able to keep throwing different punches nonstop without a hiccup or pausing to think. Practice jumping in and jumping out.

    End with a 1-2 burn out

    Footwork and diversity are key if you're planning on getting a sparring partner. Between rounds, practice your form and stance. Remember that it's difficult to practice uppercuts on a heavy bag. If possible, (if your bag has a chain on the bottom) chain up the other side and practice uppercuts on the sideways bag. Don't stick with a certain routine, mix and match. If you have extra energy, practice your form and stance.

    I recommend warming up with some basic conditioning. Jumping jacks and/or jumping rope. Lots of pushups and sit up (or crunches or leg lifts). Do them between rounds too if you have extra energy. There are many more exercises like mountain climbers and star jumps that you can do.


    Wow, looks like I got a bit carried away. Don't hesitate to ask if you've got any questions. I'm on spring break and a bit brain dead. Good luck, boxing is great.
     
  12. Regnevelc

    Regnevelc New Member

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    Awesome stuff here, I bought a bag awhile back, but I never really worked into it, I am going to set this up in the basement and get a good cardio workout going with it. Plus learning to throw a hell of a punch is an added bonus!

    Edit: You can also use the bag as weight, sling it over your shoulders and do some squats.
     
  13. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    http://www.defrancostraining.com/index.htm

     
  14. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    this thread needs to be archived. great accurate info.
     
  15. Brody_

    Brody_ New Member

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    Having been a boxer/kickboxer for many years, this is a spot on intro and covers your basics you'll *always* need. Most helpful advice ive read on these forums yet ;)

    As a side note, keep hitting the bag and doing what comes naturally, much easier to make changes after to your form/technique once you feel comfy.
     
  16. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    nice. one complete bag routine thread!
    ----

    Alright, so I been really getting heavy into my training to go Pro, and thought I would share a breakdown of how I do rounds on the heavybag because since I put together this little exercise and put it into use 5 days out of the week I've shown DRAMATIC improvements, and also I noticed most of my weaknesses, I'm not as good as I initially thought I was.

    On the heavybag I don't just start hitting the shit. Nor do I put together punch-combinations right away. I do 5 solid rounds at the moment (about to jump it to 6), and do not take breaks longer than about 30 sconds between rounds. I've put myself in a position to learn a lot about energy distribution as it pertains to my own ability. So I had to break down each minute of each round of what to work on as well, to see what punches took the most out of me and where I throw them that I needed work on. And here's the result:

    Round 1: Jab work

    1st minute, jabbing high. Keeping the chin tucked, and firing off the hip and shoulder, not just flicking, but getting a stiff pop. Paying specific attention to my legs. No tip toeing, no leaning. Occasionally feinting as well to vary the angle.

    2nd minute, jabbing to the body. Bending the knees to get low, NOT leaning over. Not leaning my head too far to the inside either, which would set me up for a nice over-hand counter.

    3rd minute, jabbing high and doubling up. This is tough because your balance will be a little off at first from jabbing low for a whole minute. Same rules apply as minute 1, but this time what you have to be wary of is when you double up the jab, your form doesn't get sloppy on the second one. You'll notice your back hand will want to drop. DON'T do that.

    Round 2: Cross work

    1st minute, cross high. This was a WEAK punch for me. When I always followed the jab with it I thought I was hitting hard with it, but didn't realize how weak it was without a jab in front of it for me personally. Plus balance on this punch sucks balls and you feel very vulnerable when you throw it alone. Gotta make sure you don't drop your lead-hand and that you pull back the cross and get back into stance quick enough. Any punch should be pulled back as fast as you fired it. Isolating this punch will also let you know if your wrist is strong. Mine has been sore for about a month. lol Also, DO NOT pull your fist back HIGH. I noticed my arms wanted to do this on their own, elbow was sky high when I pulled it back. I had to train it to stay down else I get slipped and countered to the body.

    2nd minute, cross to the body. What a bizarre punch. But I noticed it's both fast and deceptive when I trained it up. Perfect for closing a distance fast and throwing a punch at thesame time, the lunge you do when you cross allows you to step up and be in close, if you follow this punch up with a hook to the body with your lead-hand it's a very tricky combination, but combinations are for later. For now, just isolate the lead low-cross. However, again keep that lead hand in defensive position, this punch makes you alarmingly vulerable to a well-place uppercut. I would practice feinting into and out of it.

    3rd minute, cross high and doubling up. Who doubles up a cross? Who cares? being able to is a good sign you can punch your balls off. Plus it's also tricky because most people expect a follow-up of a cross to be anything but a cross. Also, for this make sure when you double it up you're not just punching off the shoulder alone. It's tough to get down and feel out the mechanics of it, but try it and you'll see what I mean.

    Round 3: Lead-hook work.

    1st minute, lead-hook high. A fun punch to work on, but a very tough one to have a lot of power on because there is little room for the pivot you do when you throw a hook with your power-hand. Almost no turn of the knees and hip, especially if you want to keep it compact and not wide and looping. So what I did to compensate for it is actually I kind of roll my shoulder into it when I throw it, as well as give my hips a good little pop. This also protects the chin pretty good if you keep it tucked behind that rolling shoulder. However, the hard thing to do is throw this punch fast enough that you don't telegraph it. So for the first minute do it as fast as you can with correct form, nevermind power.

    2nd minute, lead-hook low. It's pretty near impossible to throw this punch without leaning in and being vulnerable to an uppercut. But I think it can be done. I keep my rear-hand tight when throwing hooks with the lead-hand (unless I'm flurrying, which is a different animal altogether) and basically use the same mechanics as stated above, just that I bend my knees instead of leaning forward and exposing my face too much.

    3rd minute: lead-hook high with power. Now we go back to the same thing as minute one, save for that now you throw a knockout punch. The hardest part is now you're tired as Hell and keeping your form AFTER you land the punch is going to be murder (especially if you're wearing full-sized gloves). You're going to be tempted to stand up straight and expose your chin to breathe. Train yourself not to. How? Keep your knees bent and throw the hooks non-stop in bursts, stop, start again until the round is completely over.

    Round 4: Rear hook work.

    1st minute, high rear-hand hook. BE CAREFUL you're not too relaxed. Mentally because you know this is probably your bread-and-butter punch. Doesn't mean to Hell with form. I keep my lead arm tight with the knuckles right at my cheekbones and elbow close to my ribs, twist hips, toes, knees, POW! Also be VERY careful not to lean to your lead-side too far, and to keep that chin tucked even when your shoulders rotate. Seems stupid because you won't be looking directly at your opponent, but if he times you and fires a straight punch, it'll catch your shoulder and not your chin if you keep your form right. This punch when you land it should sound like a shotgun blast.

    2nd minute, rear-hook to the body. This is MY bread-and-butter punch. However the forming of bad habits is all over this one. Don't stand up straight, don't lean forward (which will actually take power FROM your punch), just bend your knees to get lower. Plus you have to be cognizant of returning to stance quickly because the rear-hook leaves a Hell of a window of vulnerability in general. I actually will bring in my elbow immediately following the landing of the hook, so that both hands are in position, then turn my body back to it's original position, work on doing this very FAST.

    3rd minute, double rear-hook high. I practice this specifically because if I land the left hook (I'm a Southpaw) I know at the very least I'll stun you. So it might take two to knock your ass out. Same mechanics as the 1st minute, now envision everything and everyone you hate and that this punch will end it all. lol

    Round 5: Combinations (THIS SUCKS, but it's a GOLDEN workout)

    **By this point you're soaked, your breathing heavy most likely, and you're dead tired, mouthpiece halfway out, you NEED to rest. Fuck that. Show your will and press on.

    For the next 3 minutes I work on chaining together everything I did in the above 4 rounds. I work on every single variation I can, and full speed AND power. It's really nerve-racking, but worth it. Here's some tips though that I myself use during this 3 minutes:

    - Make sure and move your feet after every punch combination.
    - KEEP YOUR HANDS UP AND CHIN TUCKED. You'll want nothing more than to not, resist.
    - Feint two or three times before every third combination.
    - Allow the bag to swing, don't stop it. Move laterally around it and try to catch the moving mass with solid punches.
    - Keep your MOUTH CLOSED.

    Try this shit and see how you like it. lol As of the moment it feels good, which lets me know it's time to step it up. I'll be purchasing an uppercut bag soon and will incorporate two more rounds of just uppercut work.

    ***New Round Added:

    So as I said I was looking to jump this routine up a bit because I was getting strong with it despite some lapses in my form as I get tired. So I added an additional round and it fucking sucks in that great way that pushes you to your physical and mental limit.

    The first thing I did was take away breaks in between rounds completely. I swig some water, spit it out, walk around for a sec, and continue, no real lapsed time between rounds.

    ROUND 6:

    There is no minute breakdown for this round. This is something I took from another thread that I mentioned in-passing and decided to do 3 minutes of it at the end of my heavy-bag routine. I mentioned that I don't stop the bag from swinging much and that occasionally I let it slam into me, and practice working on the inside or pushing it off with an elbow and a forearm and throwing what could be considered counter-punches, nice and tight, up and down. So I decided to try working on the inside for an entire 3 minutes, as most of us know in Boxing a guy who is getting tired will clinch and lay all over you hoping to smother any chance you have of hitting him. So after the 5th round of full speed and power combinations, for the 6th I step in to where the bag is pushed by my arms, tuck in tight, and go to work on the inside. I let the bag move around me, and move around it, circling, sometimes backing off to throw a hard combination, which pushes the bag back, then I step in and let it slam back into me as if it's an opponent attempting to tie me up. This is REALLY draining, holding up the weight of it with my arms mainly and my shoulders. Keeping my hands up is a BITCH. So is trying to get off a crisp solid punch when I'm in that tight.

    Now if you want to add intensity, occasionally try to flurry with the damn thing leaning on you. Hit it to where you have it pushed away, then when you move your hands back to position it will fall right back onto your arms. If you've never done work at this intensity before then I personally guarantee if you pull off all 6 of these rounds you'll want to call 911 when you're through.
     
  17. MikeTheVike1

    MikeTheVike1 OT Supporter

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    good post ices!
     
  18. ices

    ices New Member

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    Thanks :hsd:

    Brody- Good tip. Every boxer has his own style. After you learn the basics, it seems that your skills can develop in any direction. It's ok to break the rules once in a while. For example, if I'm close inside, I'll *somtimes* square up a little bit when I'm in down low to get a little more power out of my right body hook. Also, I sometimes cross my feet if I'm far enough on the outside. It throws off my opponent a little. "Is he going southpaw, changing directions, or just dancing?"

    Leo- Awesome idea. I never thought to use the bag as if I was in a clinch. I bet it's killer, but I love the work it does on my shoulders.


    I'm sure we could all discuss personal styles for pages, but the fun is in figuring out what feels best to you.
     
  19. iCEgECKO

    iCEgECKO Ballin' at 5'2''

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    Holy crap, didnt think i was going to get this much info, thanks guys.

    Sweet, just got a deal on a used bench. only $20CDN.

    and the bag was only $30CDN.

    Now i need some weights.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2006
  20. REDTAIL

    REDTAIL New Member

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    excellent advice from everyone. Just work on speed...dont crush it.
     
  21. k1d.

    k1d. New Member

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    i think ur two years late
     
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