JSP vs PHP

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by RaginBajin, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. RaginBajin

    RaginBajin Have you punched a donkey today?

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    Messages:
    8,740
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NoVA
  2. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2001
    Messages:
    28,118
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    AZ, like a bauce!
    IBflames
    IBDigital
     
  3. D1G1T4L

    D1G1T4L Active Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2001
    Messages:
    16,489
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bay Area
    :sigh:
     
  4. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    The only reason to choose one over the other would be cost and previous language experience. If you need a low cost solution (or even if you don't) and have previous experience in C/C++ (even though you really don't need it, but it does help), then PHP is a great choice. If cost isn't much of an issue and your team uses Java in other areas, JSPs/Servlets is a great choice. Either way you go, you'll have a solid technology which can be used to create full scale enterprise applications.
     
  5. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    Java is free, it does not get any lower cost than that...
     
  6. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Application servers are not free.
     
  7. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    JBoss is free and so is Tomcat...
     
  8. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Tomcat isn't an application server and JBoss is not quite as large as WebLogic or WebSphere. Anyways, J2EE development is generally more expensive than most other platforms. PHP developers can pick up Apache and be completely set with little to no cost. J2EE developers generally use WebLogic or WebSphere, which are quite expensive. Also, those IDEs aren't cheap.
     
  9. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    He said JSP, that does not require an app server, he did not say anything about using entity beans to interface to a data base. With Tomcat you can serve up JSP and web services with SOAP.

    Eclipse is free, Java is free, JBoss is free. ALso, if you want to use Weblogic, you can use it for development for free, including weblogic workshop 8.1. Larger is not always better...
     
  10. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    So yeah, lets talk about comparing Java and PHP for web development and not use all of the features of one. That's fair....

    Nobody ever said larger was better. But if you're going to compare two different technologies, compare by all they each have to offer.
     
  11. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    You will never use all the features of either...
    You said that Weblogic was larger...

    Basically it is cut down to language affinity, if you don't consider that the biggest transaction-oriented sites in the world run in a J2EE container...
     
  12. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    And I'm sure they are all running under Tomcat or JBoss and written in free editors without use of anything except JSPs and Servlets.... :big grin:
     
  13. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    Some JBoss customers...
    Accenture
    AMD
    American Fidelity
    Arch Wireless
    BASF
    BuyMedia
    California ISO
    Celeris
    CTI
    Corporate Express
    Deloitte & Touche
    Dow Jones Indexes
    EA Games - Sims Online
    eLogex
    Ericom Software
    FGM
    Genscape
    Hitachi Data Systems
    LastMinuteTravel.com
    LeapFrog
    Lesson Lab
    Lion Bio Sciences
    McDonalds
    McKesson
    MCI
    Mitre - DISA-DARPA
    Motorola
    Motability
    New York Court Administration
    Nextance
    Nielsen Media Research
    Nortel Networks
    Nuasis
    Playboy.com
    Primus
    Sabre - GetThere
    Schlumberger
    Siemens
    QAD
    U.S. Department of State
    WebMethods
    Wells Fargo

    You can use Tomcat as the web container with JBoss...
     
  14. aphoric

    aphoric Even if god did exist, it would be necessary to ab

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leaving Afghanistan
    Personally, I use Weblogic, but my point is that price is not an arguement, you can implement in a J2EE container for free. Use the best tool for the job. I don't know PHP, or much about it for that matter, so I can't say that it is not good, but I can say that J2EE is a viable architecture. It would be a hack, but you could use servlets to interface with a DB via JDBC, I am sure someone has done it...
     
  15. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    8,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    I completely agree with you. J2EE is a very strong architecture. I've worked with it for 2 years professionally and I have seen large applications done using tools such as JBuilder and WebLogic. I also know PHP is a fine solution for web applications. I've read where Yahoo is adpoting PHP in its portal software. I do believe that price generally matters though. For the most part, Java solutions are not pieced together for free. You can, sure, but that is not generally the case. You can't use the entire technology with a web server such as Tomcat. Yet you can use all of PHP with a web server such as Apache. Also, I believe that smaller shops that develop software similar to vBulletin and small/medium sized company websites that need a backend can use PHP/MySQL and complete their project faster, with fewer lines of code, and with lower cost than compared with J2EE. I just see it as different tools for different jobs.

    About your customer list. Eh, define customers. Seeing as it's free, a couple random developers in the company can be using it for testing purposes for all we know. Nice PR for JBoss of course. I'm not saying they don't deploy their applications on it, but simply saying they are a customer doesn't prove they are. Some case studies would be better...
     

Share This Page