A&P Is there such thing as a perfect histogram?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Pineapple Devil, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. Pineapple Devil

    Pineapple Devil beat it!

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    just curious. i dont know too much about them
     
  2. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    There is not perfect histogram for all pictures, but there is a perfect histogram for each type of picture :coolugh:
     
  3. natelam

    natelam New Member

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    Wow you are full of philosophical photographic questions today. In my opinion, an image is supposed to portray what you intended. The perfect histogram, is therefore "subjective'.

    If you are shooting a high-key portrait, your perfect histogram will have dispersion through the range, with the majority of the sensor information in the far right quadrant or third. Vice versa for silhouettes, or low-key style.

    If you are shooting a landscape, you want to have some general dispersion throughout the entire histogram with peaks at or near both ends to ensure you have good contrast. If there is a significant wavelength in the image (blue sky, lots of green, etc...) you'll see a spike there too.

    There is such thing as a perfect histogram, just the perfect histogram for the image you are trying to achieve.
     
  4. natelam

    natelam New Member

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    Everything I meant in 19 words and a smiley.
     
  5. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    :h5:
     
  6. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    What I suggest you do is... find pictures you like or feel are "perfect" in terms of exposure, color and tone.

    Open it up in your favorite image editor, capture, photoshop etc and look at the histogram.

    All the histogram tells you is the distribution of luminousity levels in the bit-depth you are using, usually 8-bit, so the values will range from 0-255.

    The closer you are to the 0-side, the more dark / "black" values you have, and the closer you are to the 255-side, the more bright / "white" values you have. But you knew this. To make things more complicated you can change histogram modes to individual color-channels or luminousity composite, cmyk, etc. This lets you see if you're having a problem in any one particular channel. Cameras that have a full 3-color R/G/B histogram are helpful because you can see if any one channel is blown, rather than having to guess from the composite histogram.

    Anyways, the point is, you should learn how to read a histogram and how to use it as a tool. After enough experience, you will recognize -- from reading a histogram -- whether or not you need to change your exposure or lighting arrangement to better achieve what you're looking for.
     
  7. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    you gave helpful examples:o
     
  8. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    some people don't know what high key is :noes:
     
  9. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    im high key:bowdown:
     

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