Is there an optimum/ideal strength ratio b/w muscles?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by iceburgslim, Apr 8, 2006.

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  1. iceburgslim

    iceburgslim Guest

    Do you guys think there is an optimum strength ratio between muscles groups or lifts? In other words, if you can lift X amount of weight should you ideally be able to lift that same weight in an opposing lift? OR, would it be prefferable for opposing muscles to have the same strength? Like your biceps and triceps for example? I think I read somewhere that one of the best way to prevent sports injuries is for opposing muscle groups to be of equal strength. :dunno:
    Another thing, do you think this translates into body building in any way?
    :)
     
  2. GuOD

    GuOD mcflurry diet

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    bench 300, dead 500, squat 400

    those proportions I guess
     
  3. Vailripper

    Vailripper Daywalkers have feelings too.

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    I would think it would depend alot on a persons body? IE a tall person is going to have a better DL, worse bench/squat; someone whose upper body lags behind lower body (IE me) will have a worse bench than a dead etc.
     
  4. Grouch

    Grouch Guest


    Im optimum :cool:
     
  5. Devil

    Devil I have become my terror. OT Supporter

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    :bowdown:
     
  6. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    from Bill Hartman:

    I came a across several relationships that support the balance of horizontal movements, vertical movements, and internal/external rotation in a training program.

    The key is scapular function. Ideal relationships for scapular mobility/stability were measured and they found the following:

    Protraction to retraction strength should be a 1:1 ratio, so horizontal push (technically protraction) should equal horizontal pull (retraction)

    Shoulder Abduction to adduction strength which is essentially the upward and downward scapular rotation (vertical push/pull) is about 0.85-0.95:1 or pretty much a 1:1 ratio.

    Internal to external rotation is about 1:0.67 regardless of speed. I thought this was interesting because I remember Mel Siff talking about how just because this relationship was seemingly ideal at slow speed doesn't make it ideal at all speeds.

    The only limitation is that they could only measure to 300 degrees/second and throwing speed (the fastest known human movement) is over 7,000 degrees/second. Because of this Kevin Wilk (God of all things shoulder and knee) recommends training to achieve a 1:0.75 internal to external rotation relationship or in essence closer to 1:1.
     
  7. iceburgslim

    iceburgslim Guest

    That is some good info Ceaze, thanks for that. :cool:
     
  8. Phineas Q Stork

    Phineas Q Stork Active Member

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    I can't understand that

    row more than you bench
    work your hamstrings with something more than leg curls
     
  9. Hpower

    Hpower GO GATORS

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    I know the ratio of your hamstring to quad strength should be 60%.
     
  10. Perkwunos

    Perkwunos Dog Bones OT Supporter

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    1200/800/1000
     
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