GUN Is it ok to leave a loaded mag for extended periods of time?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by hitnrun99, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. hitnrun99

    hitnrun99 New Member

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    I was wondering, is it ok to leave a magazine for a 1911 loaded (stored in a safe) for a long period of time (like several months or more)? I remember reading about a test that Glock did on their mags and they basically loaded up a bunch of magazines and then locked them away for two years and then fired them all with no problems. Can this be done with 1911 mags too?
     
  2. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

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    If the spring material behaved according to theory, you could leave them indefinitely. But no material is perfect, and some are better than others. I'd probably try to switch around which mags were loaded every month or so.
     
  3. SS109

    SS109 3100 FPS OT Supporter

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    I have heard about guys using mags loaded from Vietnam w/o any problem.

    Go ahead and leave them loaded. They are a lot more useful that way for the day when the zombies come.
     
  4. Sulaco

    Sulaco prying open my 3rd eye

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    I leave magazines loaded for years but try to replace my carry magazines every year or less. I like Wolff springs, but IMI are also good.

    It is worse on a spring to load and unload it than to leave it loaded.

    There have been stories about old WWII era magazines being found in storage and working fine.

    I have had springs work fine after at least two years.
     
  5. Ry-Ballz

    Ry-Ballz This sucks, change the channel

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    I hope not because mine very rarely get unloaded.
     
  6. Henry47

    Henry47 New Member

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    i agree with the above posts, it is not the compression that will soften the tension, it is the constant compression/decompression of the spring that will wear it out
     
  7. hitnrun99

    hitnrun99 New Member

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    Oh I will, I will...... :naughty::naughty::naughty::bigthumb:
     
  8. spartan

    spartan Guest

    There was a big discussion about this on THR the other day and it seems that the above is true. It is the mechanical wear of loading and unloading (whether by hand or blasting lead down range) that causes them to work harden and eventually break.

    It is still technically a spring, since to cause a spring to no longer spring requires the application of large quantities of heat, it just happens to be in a few pieces.
     
  9. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

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    If, and this is a huge if... IF the manufacturer uses at least a fairly good quality steel for the spring, and some sort of design safety factor,

    You can't work harden a metal without exceeding its yield strength (think of yeild strength as how much stress you are applying right at the time that the metal starts to bend). And by definition a spring does not exceed yield strength, because then it will cease to be a spring.

    Furthermore, most spring materials are already work hardened. Steel becomes more brittle when work hardened, so you don't want to leave much room for the spring to become more brittle with use. Also, depending on how much work hardening is done, the yield (think bending) strength is very close to the ultimate (think breaking) strength. So you get a spring that acts like a spring right up to a certain point, then snaps without bending. Work hardening isn't a factor, because it's already been done during manufacturing.



    CN: Don't worry about leaving high-quality mags loaded or cycling them. Go easier on cheap no-name or Chinese mags because problems can arise from all sorts of manufacturing errors.
     
  10. Mitch'SS

    Mitch'SS New Member

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    LEO keeps them loaded all the time and use them all the time ;)
     

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