Invoice for motorcycles.......?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Uween, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. Uween

    Uween New Member

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    Is there a way to find out what the invoice is on a motorcycles....?

    And if so.....can you get them to go down in the price....like you can with cars...? :dunno:
     
  2. machine81

    machine81 New Member

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    Invoice is what the dealer paid for it. M.S.R.P. is what you're suppose to pay for it. Totally differently things.

    As far as where to find the info... Sorry, can't help.:dunno:
     
  3. XR250rdr

    XR250rdr OT Supporter

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    Its very hard to find out the invoice cost and it changes very often.
     
  4. Uween

    Uween New Member

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    thanks for all the replys.........i wish i know someone that worked at a shop.....i know there has to be a way of getting a bike at invoice or right at it.......
     
  5. Jujharoo

    Jujharoo New Member

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    yup always always always negotiate. I picked up a bike for $7500 that was originally priced at $9000. I paid cash thou.
    You can even get discount on brand new bikes if you know how to deal. make a reasonable offer and stay firm.
     
  6. Team503

    Team503 Guest

    First and foremost - you are the customer. You have the ultimate power; the ability to walk out. The dealership knows that if you leave, chances are, you're not coming back. And they WANT and NEED to sell you a bike (if that salesman doesn't make his commission, how's he going to pay his rent?).

    Be straightforward. Talk in FINAL PRICE numbers. They're often referred to as "out the door" prices. It's the amount that you're signing for when you sign that loan (or the amount of cash/check you hand over to get the bike). Remember that price will NEVER include the cost of interest if you're financing, so make sure you're getting a good deal on interest rates. Finance through these, in order: credit union, then bank, then dealership. Always preferable to pay cash - as my Dad has said for decades, "it's a toy - if you can't pay cash, you can't afford it".

    Negotiate for a price, but have a firm price in mind that you're willing to accept, and don't budge on it. That bike that's $8999? Decide you're only going to pay $7500 for it. STICK TO YOUR GUNS. There is always another dealer out there that would love your business. And I wouldn't hesitate to mention that:

    "You'll only do $7900? That's too bad. I'll buy it now for $7500, but unless you can met that price, I'll just have to go give the dealership down the street a chance to earn my business. Here's my name and number, along with what I want and the price I'm willing to pay, in case you decide to change you mind. Thanks for your time, and have a great day!"

    Then walk out. Usually less than five minutes before the cell rings, if they even let you out the door. Don't be unreasonable, or you'll never get anywhere. Remember that they're a business, and they have to make a profit, or they won't be in business at all. Kelly Blue Book does motorcycles, as does the NADA Guide. Also, sites like cyclebuy.com list invoice costs for bikes.

    Remember - extended warranties cost the dealership nothing unless something breaks. If someone tells you an extended warranty "costs us $xxx", ask them what they're spending the money on if the product isn't breaking.

    Remember to build a good relationship with your dealer - they can be your best friend or worst enemy. Emphasize during the process that this is the start of a long-term relationship. If they treat you well, continue to patronize them for accessories, services, parts, and future vehicles. If they do REALLY well, send your friends over to get stuff there. The more money you make the dealership, the more willing they'll be to hook you up.

    Good reference material: http://motorcycles.about.com/cs/buyamotorcycle/a/buyamotorcycle_2.htm
     
  7. Uween

    Uween New Member

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    Team503....thanks for your reply

    i do know about cyclebuy.com but i was hoping i could find the invoice for free.....if i cant i guess spending 13$ is not bad........
     
  8. mitsuguy16

    mitsuguy16 New Member

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    Team503 strategy might not always work especially in California... i was looking for a R6 last year, and i walked out of so many shops because the demand for them is so high they really dont care if u walk out and leave. They know that some dumbass will buy the bike for over MSRP, many dealers quoted me prices of 9k+ and wouldnt budge
     
  9. Uween

    Uween New Member

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    Well i dont belive in paying for something like a motorcycle for the MSRP......i just want do it.....
     
  10. Team503

    Team503 Guest

    Well said, Clean97GTI. Also worth saying that sometimes, travelling for a better deal is a good idea.

    Cali prices are high? Drive out to Nevada or Oregon. I bet Seattle bike dealers are more than willing to negotiate.

    Also consider time of year - dealers are FAR more willing to work with you in the winter than the summer; they simply sell far less bikes at that time of year.
     

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