SRS indent in chest

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by quickone, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    This is something that has bothered me for quite some time...it's not too bad or anything but I have an indent in my chest between my pecs...it just goes in. Like my bones curved in that way or somethin. I asked my doctor about it once and he didn't say much about it except I didn't have as many chest muscles as I should there. But it also feels like my bones didn't form out like they should. Does anyone know anything about this? I would like to know more information on it besides what I do know. It doesnt affect anything I do...only effects my self esteem. Which I guess is bad enough:hs:
     
  2. Darketernal

    Darketernal Watch: Aria The Origination =)

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    Care,for all is like a bonsai tree
    Disturbances of the bones may be caused ( do not be shocked ) by bone cancer.

    I have very very very little patience with docters who do not listen to their patients, you see the body never gives 'signals' for no reason, i immediatly advice you to investigate this at 'another' docter/specialist who WILL listen to you. Let it get checked, not just for the sake of it 'maby' even being something, but also for the comfort of your mind. DO NOT HESITATE get a second opinion about this, you'll die out of stress if you keep walking with the idea that you have a disease under your limbs, do not worry though. Just get it checked. I also once had the idea that i had contracted a genital disease, afterwards it apppeared to be COMPLETELY natural, it was great walking around for 7 years with the idea that i was diseased and getting stress, while in fact it was nothing. Anyway i think you get my idea GO SEE A 'LISTENING' DOCTER and get some relieve for your sake. Never wait, if it is something the sooner the better ,and your mind will be rest at ease again.
     
  3. 3-5soul

    3-5soul Guest

    my bestfriend growing up had this also and it was like an indentation b/t his pecs.
    i was recently in a nursing class and we learnt about this, but truth be told, i forget why it happens. it's not something to worry about, b/c it happens at birth i believe, if i remember, i will let you know.
     
  4. I worked with a young man online who had Pectus Excavatum. I helped him make decisions and draw together an outline and gather resources so he could find himself a specialist and thus have the surgery to correct the condition.

    If you need information, we'll speak. It sounds like having this condition is probable in your case.

    Definition


    The descriptive term for an abnormal formation of the rib cage where the distance from the breastbone (sternum) to the backbone (vertebrae) is decreased, resulting in a caved-in or sunken chest appearance.
    Alternative Names

    Funnel chest
    Considerations​

    Pectus excavatum is a congenital abnormality that can be mild or fairly marked. The child typically has a depression in the center of the chest over the sternum, and this may appear quite deep. It is caused by excessive growth of the costosternal cartilage (the connective tissue joining the ribs to the breastbone), with resulting inward deformity of the sternum.

    If pectus excavatum is severe, it may affect the underlying organs (heart and lungs) leading to exercise intolerance or other problems. In addition, the cosmetic appearance of a pectus excavatum may pose a psychological difficulty.

    Pectus excavatum may occur as the only abnormality, or in association with other syndromes.

    Common Causes

    * Isolated defect (i.e., not associated with other problems)
    * Familial pectus excavatum
    * Marfan's syndrome
    * Rickets​

    Call your health care provider if

    * Trouble breathing develops
    * You note decreased exercise tolerance
    * Chest pain
    * Redness, swelling, or discharge from the area is noticed
    * Pectus excavatum should be discussed with your health care provider at each regular visit​

    What to expect at your health care provider's office

    The medical history will be obtained and a physical examination performed.

    Medical history questions documenting pectus excavatum in detail may include:

    * When did you first notice this?
    * Is it getting better, worse, or staying the same?
    * Have any other family members had an unusual-shaped chest?
    * What other symptoms are present?

    Physical examination:

    An infant with pectus excavatum may have other symptoms and signs that, when taken together, define a specific syndrome or condition.

    Diagnostic tests:

    Laboratory studies such as chromosome studies, enzyme assays, X-rays, or metabolic studies may be ordered to confirm the presence of a suspected disorder.

    Intervention:

    This condition can be surgically repaired. Surgery is generally advised if associated problems such as difficulty with exercise develop. In addition, some people undergo surgery for cosmetic reasons. Your health care provider can assist you in making decisions about therapy.

    After seeing your health care provider:

    If a diagnosis was made by your health care provider related to pectus excavatum, you may want to note that diagnosis in your personal medical record.

    Last Reviewed: 1/21/2002 by Adam Ratner, M.D., Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

    Source

    (1)Yahoo Health - Pectus Excavatum
     
  5. ~*Pogovina*~

    ~*Pogovina*~ Whip it! Whip it good!!

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    thank you for bringing this up. my daughter has this condition, in addition to several other congenital birth defects. She lives a normal and happy life and there is no reason (level of severity permitting) that quickone would not.

    In my experience, a lot of people (aside from the cosmetic aspect of it) are not affected negatively at all.

    also, severity makes this a case to case issue, but most people really don't seem to notice.
     
  6. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    Yes...I have had this since birth. I wanted surgery just so I could feel better about myself, but the doctor said it could be dangerous and if it isnt causing me any problems right now, not to bother because any surgery around your heart isnt that safe.

    I do know I get winded easily when I run...I hope this doesnt affect my normal life althought I would like to get surgery to correct this....but I never really had any type of surgery before..makes me a little nervous...besides that is the money factor
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2005
  7. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    So there is 2 ways to correct this? the metal piece or somehow with the bone? and if they take the metal piece out in 2-3 years what makes the chest stay out?

    wow...im reading some of the stories about people going through the surgery and I really don't want to if it's not necessary. Physically I know that if I run it gets real hard for me to breathe. Like when we ran the mile in high school I had to walk it alot of the time and I remember back in elementary school when I did it in 6-7 min once. I just thought I had gotten out of shape but now that I think about it, im sure its caused by this. I really just hope it doesnt get worse. I plan on getting married next year and I don't want to have to leave my wife because I have problems with this when I get older. I was told years back I do have a slight scoliosis but its not bad. I'm 20 now. Doing normal everyday things I feel fine. Although I don't know what its like to have a normal chest so im not sure if my fine is really "fine"

    Also...I am also tryin to really start to work out and want to gain at least 20lbs, hopefully mostly muscle. But I have always been small..around 150lbs and i'm trying to change that. Will I still be able to get a decent looking chest even with my indentation? I know it makes me more prone to man boobs and I hate that

    Forgot to add...idk if ppl who have it can...but if I hold my breath and push out, I can get my chest to push out to look almost normal...how i'd want to have it:hs:

    I dont know why I tell my mom anything at all...she just says theres nothing wrong with me and if there was doctors would have said something. Shes like the doctor said if anything were to happen it would when your like 90. she pisses me off so much...what the fuck
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2005
  8. Mel

    Mel RIP James :(

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    My cousin has that. Joaquin Pheonix has it, as well. For some, it causes no problems. For some, it can make any time of serious exercise or exertion hard on your chest and heart. I'm surprised you haven't spoken with your physician about it by now. Or your parents haven't.
     
  9. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    Like I said in my last post...my mom said oh its no big deal you've had it since you were born and you've seen lots of physicians and they have never said anything about it. But my mom thinks she knows everything. If anything at all I want it fixed cause it makes me depressed...i won't go swimming or anything else because of it and everyone always wonders why I refuse.

    My last physical though I did ask about it. The doctor only asked me if I had trouble breathing which I dont unless im running then it gets hard to breath quick. He said not to worry about it unless it causes me problems and probably wont till I get old.

    If I post a pic is there anyone that has any experience with it...tell me how severe it looks?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2005
  10. It's time to probably being making preparations for a surgical procedure if you're experiencing difficulty during sports, or aerobic cardiovascular activities. I'd not necessarily have the surgery, but finding a Thoracic Surgeon who specializes in Pectus Excavatum would be wise. There is a new procedure available which is not as intensely invasive as the original surgery once was.
     
  11. For correct and credible information on this condition and the available procedures you'll want to go HERE - the site is dedicated specifically to pectus deformity, and will provide you ample information and options. The site is sponsored and run by University of Minnesota Department Of Surgery.
     
  12. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    I checked the site out...actually found it once while surfing for info on it and while mine isnt as bad as some...its crazy that some actually almost their entire chest is in. I'm thankful for mine at least being milder than that. Just the worst thing i've ever gotten done is braces so it kinda sucks to think about surgery. Unless I go to the doctors and just find out how severe it is. But I also want to be able to just go swimming again without being so self consious about it

    Oh, and one of the reasons my mom believes nothing I say or show her is cause that one doctor that said it wasnt anythign to worry about. His reason for me having it is cause I dont have enough chest muscles...doesnt seem to know what hes talkin about. But anything I say to my mom Im automatically wrong no matter what I find online too.
     
  13. If that doctor wasn't a specialist in Thoracic Surgery, or Cardiology, then he really isn't in a position to know all the details.

    Additionally going to the surgeron to speak with them for a consult doesn't mean you have to have surgery. Simply hearing what you need to hear from a specialist who specifically deals with your type of deformity is the only way you'll be informed of what *really* needs to, or does not *need* to happen.
     
  14. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    yeah thats true...Guess I gotta go find someone...if I can ever find the time. Work and school sucks the time away

    For this year or until I grad college im kinda stuck since my job is pretty much manual labor and I wouldnt be able to do that after surgery. I'd be out a job and would have missed too much school. So I guess I can't do anything till about a year and a few months from now
     
  15. Sure you can. Don't make too many excuses: Just find a specialist and do a consultation. First find out if it's even necessary rather than waiting a year before even making the effort.

    You can schedule surgery anytime with a specialist, even if you see them tomorrow, but tell them you'd like to wait to have the surgery until 18 months from now, or however long you decide. You have to take things one step at a time and first find out if a specialist thinks surgery is needed or not. Mentioning both the cosmetic and physiological impact are important. Discussing with them all the ways it affects you will better help the specialist determine not just physically if the procedure is needed, but if it's impact will improve your quality of life psychologically.
     
  16. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    It will definately improve my life emotionally I know that...But I read somewhere that it normally stays the way it is after you turn 18 but sometimes can get worse.
     
  17. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    My mom just told me I need to see a psychatric doctor cause I want to go get my chest checked out. She thinks im crazy
     
  18. Do you have a digital camera?
     
  19. quickone

    quickone New Member

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  20. Take clear pictures of your chest and send them to me at MB58SC on AIM. I'll gladly compare them to other cases.
     
  21. quickone

    quickone New Member

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    Ok. I imed you...
     
  22. With the pictures you showed me: You clearly have the deformity, and seeing a specialist is what I'd recommend.
     
  23. Taylor

    Taylor Guest

    I have a mild/moderate case of pectus excavatum... and I was always insecure about it as well. I've started working out a lot with my chest muscles and I have noticed a big improvement. I'm pretty sure that it will not be very noticeable if I keep working out for a long time.
     
  24. interpol

    interpol you can't spell basement without semen

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    same problem here

    my doctor wasnt much for surgery but it shits me off and I don't go to the beach / take my top off in public or even friends because of it
     
  25. Minh Lam

    Minh Lam Active Member

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    Same problem here. My cousin has it as well. Standing from side view our chest looks caved in. Especially down the bottom of the sternum in the centre. EVen though I body build I am sooooooo Self Concious about it. My cardio seems fine.

    I thought of getting sugery but it hasnt posed an health problems besides self esteem.

    I do get ocassional Heart palpitation like a strong flip flop. Been to all different cardiologist and they believes its benign. I wonder is it the case that since my chest is closer to the heart this is why I can feel an ocasional stronger beat? bah who knows.
    It sucks. But I seen worse cases than my families of this birth deformity
     

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