Improving Room Acoustics?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Ronin, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    I know there are foam padding and other things but I dont really know where to look for this stuff (sound dampering). I know there has to be some way to improve the acoustics of a room using whatever, can someone fill me in on this stuff, I've tried looking it up before and never really found the answers I wanted.
     
  2. 04

    04 Guest

    Well, the first question is, how much do you want to spend? :o

    It can get rather expensive to do a high quality job :hs:

    What exactly are you trying to improve? Different treatments will affect different frequencies.
     
  3. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    You could also help us by telling us what your room looks like right now. Do you have hardwood floors, concrete, or carpeted? Are there windows? If so, are you using drapes or blinds? Etc.
     
  4. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2005
    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Troutdale, OR
    Also, how are your speakers positioned, what sort of furniture is in the room, large doorways....
     
  5. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    hmm, my room is kind of odd shaped, its about 10 feet or maybe a little more to the ceiling, but the whole thing is in the shape of an L, theres a laundry room. The floor is concrete with carpeting over it (ghetto yes but this room was converted from an old garage) There is a sliding glass door, about 2 feet from the door on each side are small windows. As far as furniture goes there are 2 couches and a large desk nearby my tv entertainment center. My computer system is left of the sliding glass door, the laundry room is right behind me. So the speakers are pointing towards that. The doorway to our kitchen is like solid oak or something. Its not sealed on the bottom though, I should probably get that done. (more explaining of the shape of the room: the foot of the L is where my computer and the laundry room are, so to my right is where it opens up) From the entrance door from the rest of the house to the oppsite wall is about 26.5 feet. The distance from the wall behind my computer the laundry room is 11 feet. The same direction but going to the wall deeper in my living room is about 26 feet.

    I'd like to help my low end frequency and if possible cure some rattling.

    Another reason I want sound dampering is to help prevent the rest of the house from hearing it.

    As far as expenses go it's probably not that much as of right now, but I'd be able to spend a lot more when we redo this whole room in the summer. Not sure of an exact number, it all depends, maybe someone could give me some figures applied to "stages" ??
     
  6. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Just some quick things I can think of. Glass windows and especially sliding glass doors are not going to be optimum. You should put drapes or blinds on them to reduce harsh reflections. It sounds like you have a carpet in front of the speakers already so that is good. If I am not mistaken, the best carpet is dense, not real shaggy or thick. The fact that your room is an L probably doesn't help your bass reinforcement. I have a similar situation here and it is real tough to get good bass. Couches absorb a lot of sound, and in an ideal listening room you would have basically a directors chair and that's it. Of course this isn't reasonable, but it gives you an idea of how much big couches affect sound. As far as sound deadening, that is going to get expensive fast. They sell large sound panels you can hang on your walls and cieling, but they aren't cheap. And, if you want to sound proof the room to the rest of the house, you will have to buy some pretty expensive insulation to replace the existing thermal insulation in your walls.

    Hope that helps a little bit, I'm sure others can chime in. Oh, one other note, you mentioned you might redo the room, if you do I would try to make it a parallelagram of some form rather than an L.
     
  7. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    converting the room into a different shape is out of the question, the cost would be insane.

    And for sound deadening/proofing I'd only need to do about hmm, 60 sq. ft of wall.

    When we redo the room all the walls are getting torn down, atleast im pretty sure they are.
     
  8. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Only 60ft^2? That's only about an 8 foot length of wall, but maybe you know that. Well, I don't know the prices off hand, but you could try to look up sound proofing insulation. I'm gonna guess it will cost a few hundred for 60sqft.
     
  9. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    that's all it costs, i was expecting to see larger numbers.

    I'd only sound deaden the one wall that is dividing this room from the kitchen, so hmm, maybe itd be 80sqft, nonetheless, its not a very big area of wall.


    Low frequency sound travels low to the ground doesnt it? Or does it travel high 2? If it travels low, theoretically additional sound dampering around the base of a wall would be effective corrrect?

    I'll do some sound dampering research tomorrow during my computer class and see what I can find.
     
  10. 04

    04 Guest

    Low frequencies travel in all directions, at least in a room that small. If you're only trying to damp low frequency bass (say <100hz) then you'll want to treat all surfaces equally. It should propagate relatively equally in amplitude throughout the room, so you'd want to place the damping around the ceiling and floor if possible (in fact, ideally all surfaces would be covered).
     
  11. 04

    04 Guest

    And depending on what stuff you end up using, it's probably going to cost a lot of money. http://www.partsexpress.com/pdf/catalog05/250pec05.pdf

    For bass, you're gonna want the thickest foam you can get. And for the stuff on the PDF that partsexpress sells, its gonna be over 500 dollars.
     
  12. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    04 already explained it pretty well. I guess if you can handle several hundred dollars for just sound insulation then that's cool. That's what you will need to do, the more the better.
     
  13. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    blah screw this project, i'm too young to be worrying about this.
     
  14. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    haha, I just saw your birthday. Yea, you don't need to be doing full room treatments at 17.
     
  15. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    being obsessed with reference audio is annoying when u dont even have a job :wtc:
     
  16. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Yessir.
     
  17. Nick6

    Nick6 New Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    14,771
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Houston Tx. US of A
    Tell me about it. :hs:
     

Share This Page