SRS I think I have a drinking problem

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by warped_mind, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. warped_mind

    warped_mind New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Messages:
    5,897
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Republic of Vancouver Island
    My family has had a problem with alcoholism and drug addiction for the past three generations (of what I know).

    I figured I was just going through a stage (I am 23), and that drinking like this was normal for my age.

    I lost employment as a hiking guide this morning because I slept through two alarms for I was out late drinking.

    My father asked me if I had a drinking problem when I returned home today, and I think I may.

    I have told myself to stop drinking, and I only drink once a week now since I have gotten out of college, but when I do, it is a fucking train wreck. I ended up in the drunk tank a month ago.

    I just cannot stop once I start :sadwavey:

    Today is the day though, I lost revenue and finally realized that perhaps what I figured was social drinking has affected my life in a negative fashion so now I must make a serious life style change.

    :hsd:
     
  2. Strizzo

    Strizzo Texas > *

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Messages:
    2,803
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX --> Houston
    sent you a pm. I'm in a similar situation, i've also decided i have to stop
     
  3. Colonel Panic

    Colonel Panic New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    2,032
    Likes Received:
    0
    The first thing I got when I went for treatment was the A.A. Big Book.

    If you don't have one, you can read it online.
    http://www.recovery.org/aa/bigbook/ww/
    Read some of the personal stories. You may be amazed at how much you can identify with them.

    Find an A.A. meeting. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking.
    :h5:
     
  4. eligh

    eligh Go To A Meeting

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2004
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California
    Good advice, do what Colonel Panic says. Go to a meeting to, hanging around other recovering addicts doing something about their problem can be therapeutic.
     
  5. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    5,987
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know if this post is acceptable in this forum or not, so if it's not please let me know and I'll delete it.

    AA is a wonderful program that has helped many people. However, AA doesn't get to the crux of the issue. AA describes alcoholism as a disease, a common trend today. Many of them also play you out to be the victim. I don't claim to be a wonderful psychologist nor fully qualified to speak of this issue, but I'll give my personal opinion.

    Thinking of alcoholism as a disease is wrong. People don't think of cigarette addiction as a disease. This isn't very different. Alcohol addiction is a personal choice that you make every time you drink. You can be addicted to the physical properties of alcohol, but it's more likely you're more addicted to the psychological effects of alcohol. This often correlates to something in your life... your peers, depression, self image, etc. You need to find what's making you drink and change that aspect of your life. The physical addiction of alcohol is nowhere near that of other addictive drugs such as nicotine. It's not too difficult to break once you get to the source of the issue.

    Be careful which peer groups you join for alcoholism. If you show up and they start focusing on alcohol as being a disease and everyone looking for sympathy for their actions, it might not be the best place to be. Social networking is great when you're trying to kick an addiction and change an aspect of your life. Just make sure it's a healthy one. Be careful how you go about this as it could have other negative side effects in your life. It might sound kind of wierd, but seeing a psychologist for alcoholism issues isn't unheard of. It's likely they'll request you attend an AA as well, but they can help you along the way to a more productive means of kicking the addiction.
     
  6. Metal

    Metal Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Thats your opinion, there are millions that believe that it is in fact a disease; try going to an AA meeting and saying that... you'll get kicked right out the door. I'm guessing you've never been to an AA meeting. Also, there are many people that say "addiction" itself is a disease; this does not just include alcoholism as one can be addicted to a number of different things.

    You also do not portray an accurate view of Alcoholics Anonymous in general. However; the thread starter in this situation may not have the disease of alcoholism and he may be able to quit on his own.. if so, our hats are off to him! This forum isn't intended for you or anyone else to decide who is an alcoholic and who isn't. People need to decide this for themselves.
     
  7. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    5,987
    Likes Received:
    0
    I understand it's my opinion. Everything I wrote is my opinion and it is controversial. Especially at an AA meeting. Taking responsibility for yourself and your actions at an AA meeting is placed just second to sympathy and feeling better about yourself. The idea is to help give you the self motivation and determination to change your life by believing it is a "disease".

    The "disease" model of dealing with addiction is used commonly in therapeutic settings to remove guilt and give the individual the belief that what they have done was out of their control. Now that they are seeking help they can make changes in their lives. It's extremely controversial, but taboo to speak about openly when it refers strictly to alcoholism for some reason. In any other context it is open to be debated and holds the most criticism.

    It is my belief that alcoholism like many other addictions is lifestyle related. And attacking the key areas of your life that trigger the addiction is key. The alcohol itself is not that hard to kick once you get to the root of the problem.

    Again, there are half a dozen major models to explain and combat addiction. However, alcholism is the most common addiction where therapy is used for treatment and as such it has recently been trendy to use the disease approach.

    Again, I understand my posts may not be appropriate for this forum. I did not intend to debate different approaches to addiction, just trying to say what I feel would help the most. And I feel targeting the lifestyle of the individual is the quickest road to recovery. There have been some studies to support this as well.

    Again, I am not 100% qualified to speak on this issue. My degree and growing up an in alcoholic home doesn't exactly make me prime material for a true professional opinion. However, this is my field and I am fairly educated on the issue. I do not intend to hurt anyone's feelings or make the situation worse. Nor do I intend to harm the flow of this wonderful forum.
     
  8. Metal

    Metal Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    JaJae, thank you for your opinion. I agree with you that for many people with drinking problems the root of the problem can be targeted to get to the drinking issue.

    However; I have found that this is not the case for me. I am an alcoholic and now that I am sober - I must focus on staying sober forever and always remember what I have been through and because of this I CAN NEVER DRINK AGAIN - thats it. You'll find many alcoholics agree with me.

    I can't afford to go with any other methods or to 'try moderation or changing lifestyles' then trying to drink again normally.. because I am an alcoholic and I will never be able to drink in any sort of moderation or normalness.

    I am not trying to argue with any of your posts or opinions; but I need to stick to what I know works for me to stay sober and thats what I'm going to do. AA has kept me sober for longer than I have ever been sober before in my life; 110 days today; so I will stay with it! :) I am not afraid to be proud of myself either. I'm confident that I can stay sober with the help of the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous and by helping other alcoholics to keep myself sober.
     
  9. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    5,987
    Likes Received:
    0
    Keep it up! Your family needs you sober. Best of luck to you:)
     
  10. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Messages:
    32,407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    OKC
    Well initially I held off posting in this thread because the debate for whether one person believes Alcoholism is a disease or not IS NOT RELAVENT HERE! What is relevant is someone is suffering and AA has been proven to help millions. You're debate JaJae, although valid, is IMO very misplaced. It simply belongs in another thread. I'm not saying it's not ok to post those ideas...but in this thread, IMO it is inappropriate.

    Now to address the disease discussion, because it has gotten so off base:

    In 1957, The American Medical Association classified alcoholism as a disease! It's not open for debate or opinion. It's been determined by scientific facts and the AMA continues to show it as such. Doing a quick google, I found the following information:

    This article goes on to say the following:

    and finally

    This article was written by: By Thomas R. Hobbs, Ph.D., M.D.

    Thomas R. Hobbs, Ph.D., M.D., is
    medical director of the Physicians’ Health Programs (PHP). The PHP, a program of The Educational and Scientific Trust of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, is a confidential advocacy service for physicians suffering from impairing conditions.

    and you can read the article for yourself
    http://www.physiciansnews.com/commentary/298wp.html

    Therefore, let's please discontinue anymore discussion IN THIS THREAD of the disease concept.

    Speaking as a man that suffers from alcoholism, whether or not alcoholism is a disease or not is only a minor issue in my recovery. It doesn't matter how I got it, it doesn't matter why I have it.....what matters is that I have it and that I accept that fact and once I do....what am I going to do about it??

    Also, JaJae, you have mischaracterized the program of AA. People suffering from the disease of alcoholism are victims yes, but that is in no way an endorsement for lack of personal responsibility. AA encourages, through the working of the steps, the alcoholic to take more and more responsibility both for past actions and future actions. This is evidenced by the 12th step, "...and to practice these principles in all our affairs"

    AA has helped millions of sufferers. I have personally seen it work in many, many lives and I'm a firm believer in the program of AA. I'm also capeable of debating many of the issues you brought up in your post. However, I would rather focus on the OP...afterall, he/she is the one suffering.

    I want the OP know that AA does work. That you are not alone in your suffering.

    If you ever need to talk....feel free to private message me anytime!!! (That goes for any alcoholic reading this also!)

    There is hope. You don't ever have to drink again if you don't want to. AA can help you and I encourage you to find a local meeting.

    Good luck and God Bless You!
     

Share This Page