I just made a very dumb mistake

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by veonake, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    So, my CD8053 came today, and I remove my CD5444 from the dash (which is a pain, because I basically have to disassemble my entire dash to get to the wires necessary. I cut off the old harness and begin to look for butt joints. It's 11pm at night so no place is open when I realize I don't have the correct size. Damn, have to wait until tomorrow... then it hits me...

    My new deck is an Eclipse, my old deck is an Eclipse... THEY USE THE SAME WIRING HARNESS CONNECTION!$)(*#@$)(*#$ :rant: :uh: :run: I could have simply unplugged the old deck, plugged the new one in, not cut any wires, and been good to go in seconds! What kind of engineer am I? Oh well... I'll pick some up in the morning, or heat shrink tubing and solder. Damn.

    I'll take pics of the two decks side by side for now though and post 'em up in case people are interested.
     
  2. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    it happens to the best of us
     
  3. spooky

    spooky OT Supporter

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    haha shit.

    i have a cd3434.. wished i had more features. give me your cd5444 :x:
     
  4. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    haha, sorry, I'm giving my Uncle a great deal on it. I'd give it to him for free, but I'm a lowly college student :o . He says, "just don't tell your aunt about it, by the time she figures it out, it'll be too late". :rofl:
     
  5. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    I'm not talking about my VW harness. I am referring to the side that plugs into the head unit itself. I could have simply unplugged it from my old head unit, and plugged it into the new one without having to redo the harness. I would have been a complete idiot if I had cut my VW harness off, haha.
     
  6. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    well, if you've already made the mistake of cutting the harness, you might as well do it right and use heatshrink and solder.
     
  7. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Not this argument again, lol. Anyway, I installed it today and you'll be happy to know I did use solder and heatshrink. The sound is incredible. I thought my CD5444 made a big difference, but wow, the 8053 is a solid step above.
     
  8. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Yea, you can argue all day about it sounding better or not... Sound issues asside, I just think it's the "right" way to do it. Crimp connectors just seem half assed. Come to think of it, I have a crimp or two in my harness from late-night fideling that I need to fix.

    congrats.
     
  9. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Ok, I can understand the feeling of it being the "right" way to do it. Crimps are often a result of the "late night" install.
     
  10. bearsdidit

    bearsdidit OT Supporter

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    I've never had a problem using crimp caps while installing a deck. I've seen jack asses using crimp caps and butt connectors while installing an alarm, that is just horrid.
     
  11. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    I haven't either, but it's kind of a almost religious or voodoo thing with car audio that a soldered connection is the "right" way to do things. I do think solder is better, but it could all just be in my head. What's wrong with crimps and alarms?
     
  12. bearsdidit

    bearsdidit OT Supporter

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    if a crimp that connects your starter wire together falls off your car wont start... something involved with an alarm could possibly damage your car as opposed to a blow fuse on your headunit.
     
  13. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    i'd never be stoopid enough to crimp, but i work at a shop that warranties my installs for as long as you own the car and equipment. a properly soldered connection is stronger than the wire itself, a properly crimped connection is still the weakest link.
     
  14. WiLL

    WiLL Active Member

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    No it doesnt. :o
     
  15. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Listen, I know this is the internet and all, but do you really still have to project the attitude of "asshole"? There's no need for insults here. If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, then you shouldn't say it to them online either. Sigh.

    Now I have to go look up the tensile strength of solder compared to silver and copper, but it's possible it is stronger. We've all acknowledged solder is the "right" way to do things, but can you give me a situation where a properly crimped connection to your head unit is going to pull apart? What stresses are on it if it's installed correctly?

    After some searching it appears the tensile strength of solder is about 6000-7000psi and silver seems to be at least 21,000psi. So, unless you have numbers to prove otherwise, your solder joint is not as strong as the wire itself....
     
  16. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Alright.
     
  17. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Take a length of wire -- say 2.5ft. Cut it in half. Unsheath 1" on each end. Solder the joint together. Grab both ends and tug agressively. The wire will break -- but it will not be the solder joint. Repeat until satisfied that the solder joint is not the weakest link.
     
  18. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Yea, if I get really bored maybe I will do that. But, the only way that would work is if the cross-sectional area is about four times that of the combined strands of the wire. Possible, but that would be pretty overkill on the joint; imagine how thick that would be, about twice the diameter of the wire. Well, another reason could be that you are pulling on the strands unevenly and one breaks then the others fail with less force.

    Btw, the length of wire doesn't matter, other than the total elongation via young's modulus, but you were probably just giving that as reference.

    I'm studying mechanical engineering, which is why I am looking at it from this point of view. It'd be much easier if someone could just point me to a link of a study by someone confirming this.
     
  19. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    if you think i'm trying to come off as an asshole, you've have not been around long enough to get to know me. it really shouldn't be this hard for you to understand, being a student. this place is to share knowledge, so why don't you try listening to someone who has been doing this for years and has the expirence for once... expirence>what you read in class. tomorrow i'll bring home some stuff and run a crimps vs. solder test for you, and take pictures for you.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2005
  20. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    i'm sorry... engineers seem to be the hardest people to get along with, because they think they know everything... especially electrical engineers. we dread when a cash and carry customer says that their brother will be doing the install, and he's an electrical engineer... because that means it's going to come back all goobered up 9 times out of 10... almost as bad as when mechanics try to do installs.
     
  21. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    The line "I'd never be stoopid enough" can be taken no other way than to come off as an asshole, sorry. Neither can the line "it really shouldn't be this hard for you to understand, being a student." And, I agree it is a place to share knowledge, why do you think I researched tensile strength? You didn't comment on my reasoning at all either which bothers me. Instead, you simply say "I'm right, you're wrong." I would appreciate a real world test, as you offered.

    I don't think I know everything, which is why I am discussing this with you. Otherwise I'd just leave the discussion. I'm studying mechanical engineering, we don't like electrical engineers very much. I'm also premed if that aids your bias a little bit against engineers. The reason why your customer comes back with a "goobered" install done by his electrical engineering brother is because engineers design things, we usually don't do the building. As a mechanical engineer I might design a part of an oil rig, but I won't be on the site assembling pipelines. Which, is why you should be blaming the customer who thinks their E.E. brother is great at soldering, not the E.E. for not knowing how to solder well.

    Now, if the customer says "my brother is an electronics technician", and he comes back with a screwed up install, that is pathetic.
     
  22. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    more audio crew arguing :ugh:
     
  23. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    i would not use solder that close to the engine, too much heat... that's why alot of AGU fuses fail in the summertime. also another place where it's not wise to use solder... directly to the speaker terminal, soldering the connectors are fine... but not directly to the terminals, unless you heatsink the terminal while you solder... i find needle nose pliers do a good job. most speakers are manufactured using the cold solder method, and any heat from soldering could cause the speaker to fail.
     
  24. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    when i get home tonight... i'll give you prep, before, and after pics.
     
  25. bearsdidit

    bearsdidit OT Supporter

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    i usually grab the starter wire on the ignition harness below the dash.
     

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