I *FINALLY* found a good explanation of the settings in Advanced System Properties.

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by deusexaethera, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Finally it all makes sense. Credit goes to www.lockergnome.com.

    - - -

    Processor scheduling
    The two options in the Processor scheduling panel allow you to control how Windows XP allocates processing power. As you saw in Figure B, the default setting in the Processor Scheduling panel is Programs, which basically configures Windows XP to focus the bulk of the processing power on the task, or program, that is running in the foreground. The Programs setting configures Windows XP to distribute processing power time slices among all running applications in short, variable-length bursts, and the program or task that is running in the foreground gets bigger time slices than those programs or tasks running in the background.

    Now, if you have an application that primarily runs unattended and performs the bulk of its operations in the background, you can improve its overall performance by configuring Windows XP to evenly distribute the processing power between the foreground and background tasks. To do so, select the Background Services option. Windows XP will distribute processing power among all running applications in long, fixed-length time slices.

    Memory usage
    The two options in the Memory usage panel allow you to control how Windows XP manages the use of available memory and system/disk caching. Here, the default setting of Programs makes more of the actual RAM in your system available to your applications by setting aside only 4 MB of RAM for disk caching.
    For most situations, the default setting will be sufficient. However, if you discover that your applications are running sluggishly and you have at least 256 MB of RAM, you may want to experiment with the System Cache setting.
    When you choose the System Cache setting, Windows XP allocates all but 4 MB of the available RAM to the system cache.(Note: So this is basically the same thing that Vista does *by default*.) The big performance gain here is brought on by the fact that this setting allows the operating system kernel to completely run in memory. Furthermore, having a larger system cache can, in many cases, improve the performance of an application by providing quicker access to multiple files.
    It’s important to note that while the System Cache setting initially grabs a majority of RAM for the cache, it’s designed to dynamically manage the memory. So if another application needs some of the memory allocated to the system cache, Windows XP will make the needed memory available to the application.

    A note on the System Cache setting: enabling the System Cache setting actually enables the Large System Cache setting in the Windows XP registry. Thus, you don’t need to manually change this setting by editing the registry, as you may have done in Windows NT or Windows 2000.

    Virtual memory
    Of all the settings in the Performance Options dialog box, Windows XP gives you the most control over virtual memory. To help you understand the options that Windows XP makes available in the Virtual Memory dialog box, I’ll go into the virtual memory concept in a bit more detail.

    Some background on virtual memory
    Windows XP uses virtual memory to simulate more RAM than physically exists in your system. When you launch an application, Windows XP loads that application into RAM. If you load several applications at the same time, all the running applications must share the same RAM. However, as you can imagine, running all those applications together will require more RAM than is actually in your system.
    In order to manage this situation, Windows XP monitors each application’s use of the available RAM and locates sections of memory that are allocated to an application but aren’t currently being used. Windows XP then moves, or swaps, these inactive sections from RAM and temporarily stores them on the hard drive in a file called the paging file.
    When those sections of memory are needed by their applications, Windows XP retrieves them from the paging file and places them back in RAM. Of course, to do this, Windows XP will most likely need to move other memory sections of other applications from RAM to the paging file. As you can imagine, this swapping process is continuous when you use several applications at the same time, and it can be a big drag on overall system performance.

    Page pooled memory: it’s important to note that Windows XP uses a new virtual memory scheme in which it divides the physical RAM in your system in two sections—page pooled and nonpage pooled. In this scheme, the nonpage-pooled section contains crucial operating system and application files and is never sent to the paging file. Of course, anything in the page-pooled section can be swapped out to the paging file as needed.

    Altering virtual memory settings
    The Virtual Memory panel displays the size of the current paging file. To make changes to the paging file, click the Change button to display the Virtual Memory dialog box shown in Figure D.

    Figure D
    [​IMG]

    Of all the performance settings, Windows XP gives you most control over virtual memory.
    In the Total Paging File Size For All Drives panel of the Virtual Memory dialog box, the Recommended size for the paging file is based on a formula that multiplies the total amount of physical RAM in your system by 1.5. As you can see on this example system, which has 512 MB of RAM, the Recommended size for the paging file is 766 MB.

    Paging file size: simple math will tell you that this value should be 766 MB, which is indeed the amount being allocated, but due to the way that Windows allocates memory, only 511 MB is actually available to the system. Thus, 766 MB is listed as the recommended size. You’ll also notice that Windows XP specifies a minimum value of 2 MB—Microsoft strongly recommends that you not set the initial size lower than that value.
    To improve system performance by adjusting virtual memory settings, you can increase the size of the paging file, or you can move, or spread out, the paging to other physical hard disks. Increasing the size of the paging file is easy: Simply enter a larger number in the Initial Size text box. Then, double that figure and enter it into the Maximum Size text box. To enable the new paging file, just click the Set button.

    The best performance increase will come from moving the paging file from the C drive to another hard disk. Of course, this requires more than one hard disk in the system. Keep in mind that you won’t boost performance by placing the paging file on another drive partition on the same hard disk.
    The performance boost from moving the paging file to another hard disk comes from the fact that while one hard disk is handling operating system functions, the other hard disk can simultaneously handle paging file requests. To move the paging file, select the C drive in the Drive list. Then, select the No Paging File option and click Set. Next, select the other hard disk in the Drive list. Then, select the Custom Size option, type the appropriate values in the Initial and Maximum size text boxes, and click Set. When you click OK, you’ll be prompted to restart your system.

    Use an old hard disk for your paging file
    Finally, if you’re like most IT folks, you probably have a bunch of old hard disks sitting in a box in the back room. These old hard disks aren’t viable for today’s operating system and software disk requirements, but they’re perfect for a paging file. Just add the hard disk to your system as a slave, format it, and configure Windows XP to use it for the paging file. [Greg Shultz]

    - - -

    One thing that I never understood before, but I do now, is that the reason you should always have a pagefile is because that gives Windows someplace to toss the unused extra memory pages that most programs request, even though they never use them for anything. This way, Windows can use the real RAM that would otherwise be tied up with tons of never-used memory pages for something useful instead.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  2. Hate Crime

    Hate Crime Don't Hate OT Supporter

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    It's hard to believe you roam these forums, giving advice, yet you had no clue about these simple utilities built into Windows until today. Way to fucking go.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    My goodness, someone needs an enema. Get thee to The Closet; I'm sure they can help you there.

    I already knew the conditions under which those settings were appropriate (except for the bit about why you always need a pagefile), I just didn't know exactly what they do that causes them to be appropriate for those conditions. As for the pagefile bit, it's an interesting technicality, but I never ran into a circumstance wherein I ran out of memory because I didn't have one, hence it was never an issue. It's good to know how a pagefile can improve RAM usage efficiency even if it never stores any "real" data, though.

    So, um, I gotta ask: did you notice the new sticky at the very top of the forum, or didn't you? Hate me all you want in private, but people come here for info, and now the next time someone asks about this, we can tell them to search this forum instead of the entire fucking internet, which means this forum is now a little more valuable than it used to be. Well, at least until you posted, anyway.
     
  4. Doomsday

    Doomsday XXX

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    if the old drive is slow as fuck, he won't gain anything.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    :Owned: and :werd:
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Funny, Jolly, when I asked you in the past what those setting did, you couldn't give me the level of detail I wanted, either.
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    dont mis-interpret my unwillingness to waste my time on you as anything other than a measure of your worthlessness.
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Go to hell. You don't explain anything to anybody; you demand that they do as you say or else be insulted. I'll take your unwillingness to explain as yet more evidence of your arrogance and fundamental lack of understanding of how and why things work as they do, and you can take your bullshit and shove it up your ass.
     
  9. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    yet i'm right 99.9999~% of the time. :mamoru:

    I just must have fucking spectacular luck, then :mamoru:
     
  10. cmsurfer

    cmsurfer ºllllllº

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    When is this shit between you 2 going to stop?

    You guys seem to ruin EVERY thread you post in.

    I like to browse here to see what's going on, but you guys make it impossible to read a thread in between you 2 kids bickering back and forth.

    Have you read the new sticky? "Be constructive and helpful, or just don't come in here."

    This is not the OT forum.
     
  11. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    We guys ruin threads? Try "Jolly ruins threads". I might get into arguments with people, but I don't make a point of insulting and provoking people every chance I get. Hell, I try to avoid it whenever possible.

    My suggestion for this forum is the same as ever: ban Jolly permanently. Every time he leaves, the collective mood in C&P improves dramatically, but the mods keep letting him come back in. Has he learned yet? No. Is he going to? No.
     
  12. red

    red New Member

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    :rofl: @ "not having" a pagefile. :ugh:
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    What do you call it, then, when there's no "pagefile.sys" on the hard drive? Do I need to take a fucking screenshot, or what?
     
  14. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    he is laughing that you would even consider not having a pagefile.


    he understood what you said. he's just amazed at how stupid you were for believing it would benefit.
     
  15. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I was thinking about that myself last night. I was wondering, in retrospect, what I thought I was accomplishing by not having any pagefile at all.

    I came to the conclusion that, while a pagefile may be useful as a container for those extra memory pages that applications request and never use, thus making it possible to pack more applications into the same amount of RAM more space-efficiently, as long as I never ran out of RAM (and I never did) then it really didn't make bollocks worth of difference how much of my RAM was being squandered.

    So it's a wash.
     
  16. rightdownupleft

    rightdownupleft New Member

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    remember guys...these are just computers!!! everyone calm the fuck down and take a chill fucking pill. Do you people get laid? if not, please do so!!!
     
  17. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    Every once in a while, I think I should start spending more time in this subforum. Then within about three clicks I remember why I don't bother. :cool:

     
  18. red

    red New Member

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    You always have a pagefile, genius. One is designated by default when you install windows. That's what virtual memory is in Windows. That screen is for changing your virtual memory settings, not creating virtual memory.
     
  19. red

    red New Member

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    I call it not being able to find your pagefile. I suppose you could turn it off entirely, but I can't imagine that your machine would run for shit.
     
  20. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    CONGRATULATIONS! You managed to understand what he said in no uncertain terms! :hsugh:
     
  21. red

    red New Member

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    :ugh2:

     
  22. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    SHOULD always have a pagefile != DO always have a pagefile. :slap:
     
  23. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Uh, no, genius. Virtual memory is the allocation of memory in such a way that every application thinks its block of RAM starts at address zero -- it's a critical feature for running a multi-tasking OS, and it's implemented in hardware, with a little IC on every motherboard ever made that quickly translates virtual memory addresses into physical memory addresses, and vice-versa. (That would be the one little IC that gets hot enough to burn the fuck out of your finger if you touch it, btw.)

    The pagefile is just a sub-feature of virtual memory, and it can very easily be shut off. In fact, UNIX doesn't even use pagefiles (or at least it didn't used to use them) -- if you run out of RAM, you go buy more RAM, because if you're using UNIX then you're probably an IT admin, not just dicking around at home trying to check your email.
     
  24. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Well, there are people who imagine that comets hide UFOs that will take them to Heaven, so...whatever dude, knock yourself out.

    Back in reality, however, I ran without a pagefile for over a year with no ill effects. I eventually turned it back on because I got sick of Adobe Photoshop bitching about no pagefile every time I used it.
     
  25. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Yeah, it's kinda like that. Sometimes I think I hang out here just to keep the voices distracted so they don't bother me.
     

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