SRS I cried for the first time in a long, long time

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by 7960, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    I took my 3 year old to dinner at a local pancake place... that kid's a freak for pancakes for dinner!! Anyway, were were seated next to a woman in her 40s and her mom, probalby in her 70s. The mom was obviously in some state of dimentia, maybe alzheimer's but who knows. The woman told her mom a story and her mom laughed. It seemed like they were having fun. Then 5 minutes later the mom asked a question and the woman told the same story again and the mom laughed. Then 5 minutes later the mom asked the same question...... this went on for about 45 minutes. It was both heartwarming to see this woman taking her mom out for dinner and extremely sad to see her mom getting wrecked by this disease.

    The whole time I kept thinking there was something familiar but I couldn't put my finger on it. We were getting ready to leave when my 3 year old pretty much pointed and yelled "she's like grammy!" and it hit me and I started crying right there in the restaurant. My mom's mother had alzheimer's in her 60s. It really scared my mom so since then she's been doing anything and everything to help prevent dimentia but there's no stopping it. She takes vitamins and exercises and eats right, etc. My mom is now in her late 70s and it hit me when my son said that...mentally my mom is definitely different than she was even 5 years ago. She reads all the time and she loves puzzles and stuff. She can carry on a conversation and ask pointed questions, but I could have the same conversation with her 10 times a day and she'd ask the same questions again and she wouldn't know it.

    I talked with my dad and he said he noticed it, too, and already took her back to the doctor. They were waiting for the results before they said anything. My dad told me the doctor said something to the effect of "You need to prepare yourself. Her mother had it and it may be that your wife pushed it off as long as she could." I know my dad and he's going to go to more than one doctor and try whatever's available, but the fact that my dad told me the doc said that says he's not sure if there's much else to do.

    I guess it took my 3 year old to point out what none of us wanted to admit...mom is getting old. This sucks.
     
  2. Indrew

    Indrew New Member

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    I can't bear to think what will happen to my mom in the next few years, she is getting up there in age too....

    :wtc:
     
  3. Timdog

    Timdog New Member

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    My grandmother is getting into her 90's now and she can't even talk much anymore. It's so sad to see her now. She needs constant care and care that we can't offer her so we had to put her up where nurses can take care of her. Luckily these nurses are extremely nice and forgiving with their patients. But it is sad to see this happen to them. She used to be one of the sweetest people I ever met and now she seems like she's a really tall and wrinkled 2 year old. :wtc:

    Oh well, these are the sort of things in life that you almost just have to accept. Your dad is doing the right thing and that shows that he definately does care about your mom. Be happy about that. :hs:

    Otherwise, I really think the only thing you can do is accept it and try to make the best of it. It's hard, but you have to do it. :hsd:
     
  4. capcom_7

    capcom_7 OT Supporter

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    my grandpa is becoming like this
    it makes me ridiculously sad
     
  5. Darketernal

    Darketernal Watch: Aria The Origination =)

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    Care,for all is like a bonsai tree
    Well there is hope on the horizon, new medicines that prevent people from getting alzheimer are improving rapidly. Whats important is that you remember that person for who they really where when they where still responsive and active, not as the shriveled up,child alike care needing almost mindless individuals in some bed.

    Its important that a person of who you expect to have alzheimer takes at least a yearly examination , because its a slow degrading process, you might fail to see how someone has become mentally ill. And ask about new medicines and care that is available for these people.

    :hug:
     
  6. teo

    teo . => ? => !

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    Eh?
    It sucks to have to let go of the people you love while they're still living. :hs: I was close to my paternal grandmother and lived with her for some time before striking out on my own, and she was sharper than a tack and lived on her own right into her 90s. When she had another stroke that took away most of her memory (both long- and short-term), it hurt me to think that she wouldn't know me any more or remember the times we shared. It hurts even now just thinking about it. I choose to remember her for the grand lady she once was instead of the shell of one she's become.
     
  7. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    There are new medicines being developed AND some evidence that it might be related to a form of dehydration....although I have yet to see any scientific evidence supporting this. Can't hurt tho...be sure she's drinking lots and lots of water every day.

    I watched my grandmother go through this and I'm also afraid my mom will also. It's heartbreaking to see the ones we love age. But it's also part of our life cycle. Love them while they are here...both mentally and physically.
     
  8. JJDiri

    JJDiri New Member

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    Alzheimer's runs in my family as well. My mom's mother, grandmother, and great grandmother all had it. That's as far back as we know. The bad news is, it'll most likely happen to me and my mother. It's so sad to see my Nana unable to recognize even my face. She used to love me and I loved her as a child.

    The good news is, she's in the late stages of her dimentia. She simply cannot get any worse, but she still recognizes my mom. My mom goes to see her often, and my Nana smiles when she comes- she smiles for no one else.
     
  9. What if Alzheimer's actually had a comorbid psychosomatic element necessary for it's genetic implementation?

    Not only genetic, but also having a memetic factor communicated through social and family dynamics neurolinguistically.

    Wasn't it the famous evolutionist Gould that said any genetic predisposition could be overuled, possibly through catalyzing well being and the attendant self-disciplines?
     
  10. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    put down your "medical word of the day" calendar and say what you mean..... are you trying to tell me she's getting alzheimer's because she believes she's going to get it? And you believe that gould shit... that was can stop what's genetically predetermied through "good living"?
     
  11. johan

    johan Active Member

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    He's trying to say maybe her beliefs shape her reality. And in turn, her reality concomitantly shapes her biology.

    And to top it off, well thinking and well living might reverse it all.
     
  12. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    that's what I said and it's bullshit.
     
  13. johan

    johan Active Member

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    Yeah.
     
  14. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    If I ever met 'Moral Weakness' and his vile theory on the street, I'd kick him to death.
     
  15. XPX

    XPX New Member

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    Seeing parents and grandparents get that old is hard, I watched my grandfather die in 3 years time, he used to walk to the store (even with diagnosed Alzheimer and Parkinson) and the day he said he couldn't go anymore it made me feel horrible, in 3 years he lost his abilities one by one until he died 2 days before my birthday this year....:(

    :hug:
     
  16. But this is just the kind of reactive stuff to be expected from being inundated with a neurolinguistic meme, right? "I am totally irresponsible for my own health". Exactly, Your self-fulfilling prophecy has already come to pass in your family. You may be able to prevent a similar fate for yourself, but for someone with your attitude towards awakening your own healing potential, nothing.

    This discussion reminds me of a story where a small group of people pop back in time, to the pre-WWII era, and start discussing laser technology with the contemporaries. It happened that details of something so everyday to us now were indistinguishable from magic to those living back in 1939.

    And thus you are stuck in the current consensual unreality that prevents even an acknowledgment that psychosomatics can work for your health.

    The voguish, desultry memetic virus that your posts betray is all you will ever know. I can not help you here, for the reasons given.

    But good luck
     
  17. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    1. if you think you can "will away" a disease with physiological basis then I dare you to stick your face in a bag of asbestos, suck in hard, and keep yourself from getting lung cancer

    2. Yes, in 50 or 100 years we *may* have a cure for alzheimer's and people may think "the solution was so simple" but that doesn't help today and I highly doubt the cure is going to be "believe it's gone and it'll go away."

    3. Some bullshit story about going back in time is not helpful. The US having nuclear weapons today doesn't help Washington in the fight against England for our independence.

    3. please never post in a thread of mine again
     
  18. percent

    percent deluded

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    I have heard this too. Water is very important for brain function (along with proper nutrition in general). The brain takes up a huge portion of metabolic energy. As its trying to survive, you definitly want to pamper it and give it everything it wants. It won't handle stress as well as a younger brain.

    My great aunt went through this. It was very sad, but almost funny at times. When trying to transfer her bank acounts to my grandma, the teller asked her approval and she said "I don't know what's going on, but I have never seen any of the people before in my life." She fell and forgot about it, then told people her injuries were because she probably got in a fight and hoped that she won :rofl: She always had a slightly sadistic sense of humour and never lost her personality though she could not make new memories.


    And the Gould stuff has some validity, but is bullshit in its extreme position. A positive attitude has been show to help recovery (even help alot when compared to a negative attitude), but cannot stop everything. All nature cannot be overcame by nurture. It is a mixture.
     
  19. Apothis

    Apothis New Member

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    My grandmother had Alzheimers in the later years of her life. She was also known to have such a healthy body ..and ultimately her body continued on longer than her mind. She was a vegetable for years before it was over. The funeral was the first time I ever saw my grandpa cry. Though for years, for all intents and purposes, she had already been "dead" and it was just finally official. I don't remember too much about her forgetfulness though; I was pretty young. I remember that sometimes she would give me something and then get all mad and demand to know where I got it. Then I'd tell her and she would get kind of defensive and confused, just take the item and walk off. I didn't know what it was about at the time and thought she was just being mean (possibly a reason why I always like grandpa more). But I later came to understand it wasn't her fault, and it was more serious than just occasionally forgetting stuff. She spent her last several years in a nursing home, not even remembering who we were, thinking it was still the 1950, ect. Towards the end I don't think she even talked at all anymore. She would just look at you with an indifferent blank gaze. By this time it didn't seem like anyone was really "home" anymore and of course she could no longer feed herself or anything else. To see someone who had always been so healthy and proud, reduced to ...that. :wtc:

    It's been a fear that her condition has been inherited by younger generations. I know my Aunt was certainly afraid of getting it, and I don't remember, but I think she may be showing signs herself. It's unfortunate enough to die in the first place, but to start forgetting your life and those in it before it's even over seems like getting cheated out of an awful lot. In the end, all you may really have is your memories. But to not even have that to take with you is just terrible.

    Hopefully someday medical science (stem cells?) will be able to cure things like this.
     
  20. Right; but do you understand how poignantly hard it is for most people to manifest the actuality of well being? I'm not talking about the cardboard character smiles that one sees people dramatizing occasionally; I'm talking about the deeper, supreme confidence that only genuine self-discipline and personal understanding can muster through achieving total sanity.

    I never discuss anything as real that I've not actually experienced personally.

    sincerely,
     
  21. Arclight

    Arclight Hypercube

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    :wtc: I shouldn't have come into this thread.

    This reminds me of that movie "What dreams may come" where there's a line that goes something like:

    "In hell there's real danger. Of losing your mind."

    I think this is the most terrible thing that can happen to a person. :wtc:
     
  22. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    If you don't understand a post, just leave it be.

    If you come in here and tell people with essentially terminal illnesses that its their fault, you WILL be banned. Period. Knock it off. This forum is for helping people, and you're not doing any of it.

    Just to humor you, how do you explain the obvious brain damage MRIs show in Alzheimers sufferers?
     
  23. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    I asked you not to post in my thread any more. Blaming my mother for getting alzheimer's is pretty fucking sick.
     
  24. Drifter87

    Drifter87 Yippi-kay-ay, Motherfucker

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    On my mothers side... my Grandfather just passed away and my Grandmother is becoming like this... it is so sad to seem them like this, but no one lives forever and both of them have lived very full lifes.
     

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