I broke my linux machine v. Help?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by fuzion1029, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. fuzion1029

    fuzion1029 New Member

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    So I've got Fedora 8 on my laptop and everything was working great till i tried to change my login name. My login name changed, but home directory stayed the same. So when I try to log in, it just kicks me right back out because i don't have a home directory anymore. And it wont let me change the name of the old directory to match my username cus i don't have permissions to do that. Is there anything I can do?
     
  2. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    do you know your root password? login as root and rename the directory and change ownership recursively from there.

    do you have another user? login as he and sudo rename/change ownership as well.

    if not boot in single user mode: you're probably using grub so at the grub screen hit "e", then select the kernel you want to boot from, hit "e" again. at the end of the line type in "single", hit enter, then hit "b".

    you can do whatever you want in single user mode.
     
  3. fuzion1029

    fuzion1029 New Member

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    sweet. the first thing worked.

    One more question. As a last ditch attempt to make renaming my home directory work i set the permissions for it to 755. Is there a tool to set the permissions back to what they're supposed to be? Should everything in the home directory have the same permissions?
     
  4. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    change the ownership, not permissions to your new user id.

    chown -R fuzion /home/fuzion

    There isn't a native tool to undo permission changes. 755 is not horrible, but I don't see how it helps your situation since all you can do is read and execute the stuff in that directory. I assume you want to be able to write to it too.

    It depends on the how the files are created. If they were all manually created by you, then it depends on your umask.

    if you already did a 755 to everything, just go back in and see which files you do or don't want group/other rw or x.
     
  5. fuzion1029

    fuzion1029 New Member

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    sweet, thanks crontab!
     

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