I also love virtual machines.

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by deusexaethera, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Even though IT isn't my core competency, I've gotten to do a lot of really satisfying IT stuff lately. My server room is all nice and clean, all of my old servers are replaced with new ones (except for the domain controller, but who gives a damn about that one anyway?), and I just finished setting up development and testing environments for the largest web application suite my company makes. And I did it entirely using virtual machines. In fact, everything except my domain controller and my file server are running in virtual machines now, from FTP to Sharepoint to Apache to OracleDB 10g; it's so much more flexible to work with VMs, the way I can copy them from host to host as needs be. All in all, I'm running 11 VMs on three host machines, with 24 cores and 32GB of RAM and ~2TB of disk space between them. Nothing awe-inspiring, I suppose, but it's cool to have that much hardware at my call -- and to actually have something useful to do with it.

    With all that out of the way, now I just gotta get more design work. It's just my luck that the project lead I was making flowcharts for quit his job a month after I started working for him.
     
  2. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    wait... 3 machines is a lot of hardware? total 24 cores, 32Gb of ram and 2Tb of disk? lol. at my last job i had a single server with more than that and it wasn't used for virtualization.

    but, i hear what you are saying. virtualization is cool. we had a production problem yesterday, 2 of our web servers were completely overloaded and we didn't have any additional hardware to throw at it, but we were able to deploy 2 additional "servers" using a Solaris Zone and an LDOM in a few hours. it only took us that long because we aren't completely used to them yet and weren't fully prepared, but my boss wanted to see what they were capable of.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's a lot of hardware compared to what most people will ever use at once. But no, it's not a datacenter.

    Mostly, it's about 4x the processing power and 3x the storage capacity of an entire full two racks of old servers that I finally was able to decommission once I had these new machines at my disposal.

    - - -

    On another note, what's your impression of the latest release of openSolaris? It looks pretty slick, but I have nothing to use it for, so it's hard for me to really form my own opinion about it.
     
  4. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    to be honest, i haven't even had a chance to mess around with it.
     
  5. Mike99TA

    Mike99TA I don't have anything clever to put here right now

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    Dang...how old were the computers in that rack? We have racks full of computers where every single computer is about as much storage/processing power/memory as your entire datacenter.
     
  6. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    i think you can buy a MacPro with higher specs than that.
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dual P3 Xeons from around 2000-2001 or so. Slow as shit, though they were surprisingly good at reprojecting digital map data the one time we used them for that, to get a project done as quickly as possible.

    Anyway, I doubt those machines you have are 2U apiece.
     
  8. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    i have a 2U server at work that shows 64 "cores." technically, it only has 8 cores, but it handles 8 threads per core based on how the architecture handles its multiprocessing. we'll be getting the dual proc ones soon, so 128 "cores" soon. gotta love the new T-series systems from Sun.
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    CoolThreads is a neat technology, but if I'm not mistaken, it's not x86-compatible, which is to say, it's not compatible with almost every application (server or client) currently in use. That's a point against it, though if you're willing to use Solaris for everything you do server-side, I suppose it doesn't matter to you.

    Did your machines cost ~$5000 apiece, by any chance?
     
  10. Mike99TA

    Mike99TA I don't have anything clever to put here right now

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    Hmm..the highest spec 2U servers we have here are 8 processors with 32GB of memory and 864GB of storage...

    However the servers I mentioned that are the same spec as your datacenter are 3U which really isn't that large.
     
  11. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    nah, these are a bit more expensive, a bit more stable, a bit better performing. ;P
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I bet they run Python like nobody's business.
     
  13. trouphaz

    trouphaz New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    you should see them run Sybase. one of those beat out a 12-cpu domain in an E15k (though they were SparcIII procs at 900Mhz i believe). so, a 2U system beat out a huge beast.
     
  14. tyrionlannister

    tyrionlannister New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New York
    ESX + VMotion is pretty damn cool. Running out of power/ram on this farm? Just transfer a few machines, with no downtime.

    I've been playing a lot with Amazon's EC2 lately, for personal projects. If you don't have your own infrastructure ready to work from, it's the most flexible way to scale your environment quickly and cheaply. You can build and save your machine images, then turn them on and off as needed, and only pay for running time plus bandwidth. Small instances start really cheap, at $0.10/hour plus bandwidth. You can have new instances up and configured within a couple of minutes instead of the days it sometimes takes for a datacenter to setup a new machine and then for you to personally configure it. With a bit of work, you can even script the provisioning process. Use heartbeat/mon/nagios to monitor your services and performance; if the load gets too high, have it automatically launch a new instance. Script another threshhold to gracefully kill your instances when usage is low or when a server is down to save yourself money. I like it.
     
  15. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nah, just the free VMware Server. Considering the idea to run all of our not-totally-critical servers as VMs was entirely mine, and the only reason I got away with it was because my boss was in the process of quitting when I set them all up (i.e. he didn't care anymore), I'm not in a position to be demanding expensive software to service what is essentially still an experiment, successful though it may be.

    Just yesterday the head of IT in our main office called me and asked me to explain again why I needed 20 IP addresses for 5 servers. :rolleyes: So I asked him to send me his network diagram for my office, and I'd send it back to him with updates and notes.
     

Share This Page