HT sub bottom out?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Kieffer87, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    I have a 10" Klipsch KSW-10 HT sub. At louder volumes and deeper notes I get this sort of "bottoming out" distorted sound. Gain is turned up about 75%, Bass on receiver is at 0.

    I also found out in the past when I had it in my living room with roommates the one liked to listen to music pretty loud while it was distorting like crazy. (Don't get me started:o)

    You guys think it is just the amp clipping or the sub is shot? I really don't want to replace the whole unit if necessary.
     
  2. Ronin

    Ronin Guest

    Well if I heard it this would be much easier.

    Has it done this before? Or is this a new thing you are worried about?
     
  3. Waddup you?

    Waddup you? OT Supporter

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    is there a crossover on the sub? maybe your crossover point is too high? or you are just plain pushing your sub too hard?

    when I bought my sub, I first had a 10" and just wasnt up to par. too much overexcursion. I ended upgrading to a larger 12'. both were velodyne subs. now I want an svs sub.
     
  4. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    Well it has always done it on lower frequencies when playing hard. Mainly only when playing music. However it is a bit worse and more frequent now and it seems if I have it at a bit more than normal listening volume and I get a song with alot of low frequency bass it makes the sound. I will try and record the sound and see if that would be easier.

    I would really love to replace it with a velodyne or svs 12" but unfortunetly I'm a poor college kid who is tight on space and money.
     
  5. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    Here is a clip from my phone. It really doesn't do it justice. It sounds ALOT worse than it really is but the sound is very similar. It sounds like it is almost a blow sub but at the same time at lower volume it hits and sounds just fine.

    Click here to watch Sub-27
     
  6. eighteen_psi

    eighteen_psi Active Member

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    How would a crossover being too high cause a sub to bottom? Higher frequencies require minimal displacement even at ridiculous levels. On the other hand, to reproduce deep bass with any authority in a home generally requires huge drivers, huge enclosures and huge power, none of which are present here.

    A driver bottoming is the result of being asked to displace more than its capable of - either by clipped power or more likely, just trying to get car-level deep bass in a home with a small driver/box/small power. The later is what I usually see....probably what's going on here. Drop the gain, problem goes away, given nothing is broken that is.

    If you don't have enough output with the gain set properly you have two options...either run it like it is now and get more boom at lower volumes or run it set 'correctly' allowing overall volume without outrunning the sub, or change the gain based on what you want to do at a given time. Another option is a subsonic of some sort....a high pass set at whatever point your sub runs out of steam at whatever volume you want it cranked to. You'll lose the really deep stuff but get the output you're probably looking for higher up.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2007
  7. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    Thanks for your response. Explain's mainly what I was thinking but just wasn't sure about. Do you think it would be worth it to replace the sub with something that could handle a bit more output?

    I guess I know my car audio pretty good and when I looked up my specs and the amp put out 55 watts rms and 200 peak I kinda had to chuckle that it is even as loud as it is. This was why I was wondering if it was just the amp clipping more than the sub. Being the amp doesn't really put out that much power. Am I wrong in thinking this?
     
  8. eighteen_psi

    eighteen_psi Active Member

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    Drivers don't 'clip' - clipping is the result of an amp being driven above its capacity such that it outputs 'clipped' waveforms...aka squarewave sound. An amp that can put out 55wrms will still run an efficient sub to fair volume, particularly in a car :dunno: Many subs have in-car sensitivity over 100dB/watt so it can get serious really quick.

    All that said, 55 won't satisfy the average bass head today and won't cut it on bass-heavy tunes like modern hip-hop and electronic really, not with authority anyway.

    As far as the HT sub goes, partsexpress yourself a kit...a 12" dayton driver or some such thing and a 300-500W plate amp. Won't cost a lot, will solidly outperform the Klipsch. Actually....first experiment with placement in the room if you haven't. Not sure why I didn't think of that sooner, but placement as well as rotation, distance from the walls, etc. will make or break a subwoofer's performance, particularly down low. Try corners, try one wall, try facing 45 degrees out from the corner, 90 degrees down each wall, etc. Different placements create different types of gain...find one you like.
     
  9. ssabripo

    ssabripo Banned

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    your first mistake was putting the gain at 75% on the sub. Next time, keep the sub at no more than 50%, and turn the sub gain on the AVR up. Make sure you properly calibrate and level match with the rest of your speakers. Get a radioshack SPL meter ($29) and use your AVR's test tones or get AVIA/DVE discs and do it that way.

    Second, looks like your driver is shot. If you are good with tools, get a nice decent driver like a Q15 from ficaraudio, or RL-P15 from soundsplinter, or Dayton RS3390HO (partsexpress.com), and a decent amp like a behringer EP1500 or similar. Get some MDF wood, or a sonotube, and make yourself a sub that will KILL two of those klipsch.
    IF you are not that skilled or don't have tools, then a kit like the 15" dayton MKIII from partsexpress is another alternative.
    But for that price range ($600), you are better off just buying an Epik Knight:
    http://www.epiksubwoofers.com/Products.html
     
  10. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    Thanks for all the great info guys. I have messed with the placement a little bit but the sub is in my room therefore I don't have all that much space on walls to put it. Maybe I will mess with it some more tonight.

    I have considered building my own but I don't have a whole lot of free time with school and work. Maybe over xmas break. Maybe after Christmas I will be able to afford something a bit nicer.
     

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