HP ftl (wtf?)

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by russ6570, May 22, 2006.

  1. russ6570

    russ6570 New Member

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    My psu died on my computer. I currently have an old one hanging out the side of my computer. I tried to take the dead psu out of my computer to try and find a part number and it is RIVETED into the frame. Or rather, it has the cradle it sits in riveted to the fram around it, making it impossible to pull it out. What a POS. BTW, computer is an HP Pavilion 733n
     
  2. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    looks like its time to either drill out some rivets, buy a new case and psu...or trash that computer all together
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    is the psu screwed into a mounting plate that can be removed from behind?
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I'd just buy a new case. That is, unless HP uses funny-shaped clips to hold their motherboards instead of screws, like Dell does.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    even the dells can be transplanted into new cases... the plastic retaining clips are reminiscent of the old days of AT motherboards. The most you have to do is re-wire the front panel connections to work with dells proprietary header.

    again, please don't post what you don't know. I'm getting tired of having to say it.
     
  6. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    Ha, that's nothing. I had some old compaq ipaq PC that I got from work. Had some extra RAM and CPU's laying around that I'd figure I'd swap out. Most of their boxes had torx screws in them, which I had all the tools for from working on other boxes in the past. These screws were slightly different. They had this shit in them:

    [​IMG]

    A raised nub within the torx screw. I was like, what the hell are wrong with my bits. Finally saw the damn screw, figured, no problem, I'll just call our onsite HP field engineer. Stops by my office and was like "WTF is that, I've never seen that before?!"

    There's HP/Compaq for ya.
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    That's called a Torx Security Screw. I have all the bits for those. Actually, I don't even use my normal Torx bits any more because the hollow security bits work for both security, and normal applications.

    I've also seen allen screws with the same thing.
     
  8. Yep

    Yep Knick knack paddy whack, give the old dog a bone

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    Word. Some car manufacturers will use them on engine sensors. My old car used them on the MAF sensor housing.
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Have you looked inside a Dell, Jolly? I know about the round plastic retaining clips you refer to, because my first computer was a 16MHz AMD 286. I built it myself from spare parts at my father's friend's house.

    The retaining clips I'm talking about are made of metal instead of plastic, are long and flat instead of round, and appear to be designed to be attached once and then never removed again, at least not without a special tool.
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Those Torx bits will also work for metric hex bolts, because Torx sizes are measured in tenths of a millimeter. SAE hex bolts will still need a separate set of driver bits.
     
  11. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I getting tired of correcting you... But I will again. You do NOT want to use a Torx screwdriver to remove an allen metric bolt. The torx would only contact at the "star" points and would strip very easily. An allen wrench would contact along the flat surfaces and you could apply torque more evenly. Obviously this holds true with SAE sizes, as well.
     
  12. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Yes I have looked inside a Dell, and I have yet to find one that I could not successfully transplant into an ATX case.
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I do this on a regular basis with a good set of hardened Torx drivers when I work on my mountain bike, which exclusively uses metric Allen bolts. I haven't stripped a bolt in the eight years I've owned the thing, and I've had to use a torque wrench to tighten/loosen a good number of the bolts. If it were going to strip, I think it might have done so by now.

    Tell me Jolly, if allen wrenches contact on the flat sides of the driver bit, then why is it always the corners that get rounded off when the driver slips inside the bolt head?
     
  14. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Funny thing is that for some of my sockets, they don't even have corners... They have semi-circles that protrude in to contact the flat portions. :mamoru:

    Touching the SIDES (maximum surface contact) will more evenly distribute torque.

    Using the wrong tool for the job, even if it has not given injury in the past, does not make it proper.
     
  15. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Actually using the sides of a driver bit to apply torque is a better approach than using the corners. What brand of allen wrenches do you use? I've seen socket wrenches that look like what you describe, but I've never seen allen wrenches like that.
     
  16. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I got them at Sears. I think they're "Champion". I tend to stick to Craftsman, but the salesman said he didn't have the craftsman like those, and the Champion carried the same in-store lifetime warranty (only reason I buy Craftsman).
     

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