A&P How to take interior photos like this?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by coughlin's law, Oct 28, 2007.

  1. [​IMG][​IMG]

    What kind of finishing, or settings do they use?
     
  2. iridium130

    iridium130 OT Supporter

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    seriously?

    looks like a wide angle :dunno:
     
  3. I have a wide angle, but my photos don't look like that...

    My photos are amateurish still...
     
  4. Xtreme2k2

    Xtreme2k2 GTI Crew ಠ_ಠ OT Supporter

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    lighting?
     
  5. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    nope. i dont see use of flash in any of the images. if lighting in your words meant flash. however i do know that it takes alot of practice and also knowing what time of day to shoot. Its quite obvious to me that there is a huge glass door or huge windows in front of the kitchen therefore letting massive amount of light is and also creating a huge soft box type light source. That mixed with good ambient exposure and all the white walls bouncing the light leads to that kind of image. I personally dont like either image, but to each their own.
     
  6. Xtreme2k2

    Xtreme2k2 GTI Crew ಠ_ಠ OT Supporter

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    oh :dunno: I'm just a noob
     
  7. i was talking photos of lofts today and my biggest complaint was the lack of light, my sigma 10-20 did hunt a few times.. and i was shooting in TV 1/80, indoors... and other times shooting 0"4 (handheld) ... still it feels like something is missing
     
  8. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    well first what time of day did you shoot at? dont expect images you posted unless teh conditions are the same, like i said the windows helped with the amoutn of light coming into the loft. Lets see the images you took so we can help. i personally would shoot manual focus for things like that or bring a small flashlight to light up everything so my lens can autofocus, and then shut off the flash light.
     
  9. Jonny Chimpo

    Jonny Chimpo OT Supporter

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    .

    Also looks like it was shot with a very small aperture (f/16ish maybe) and obviously that would mean it was on a tripod.

    That's obviously just ambient natural light though.
     
  10. tenplanescrashing

    tenplanescrashing Active Member

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    the above shots look very p&s...good lighting is very key, whether it is ambient or strobe based.
     
  11. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    again there are no strobes in these shots
     
  12. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    it's all natural lighting, as you can see the glare on the fridge, microwave, etc.
     
  13. vwpilot

    vwpilot New Member

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    Its hard to tell from the size of the photos, but I would bet there is more there than just natural lighting. There is definitely a lot of natural light there, but I think there was probably something else used to fill in some of the nooks and crannies that natural light would not penetrate.

    Remember, good interior photography will not look like there are strobes being used.

    How many strobes do you think were used in this shot? http://www.frasierphoto.com/gallery/photos/12/preview/Hampton-Inn.jpg

    Or in this one? http://www.frasierphoto.com/gallery/photos/12/preview/Four-Points.jpg

    There are a lot of small dead spots that need to get light into them and natural doesnt always do that.
     
  14. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    In this one i see three. One camera right,the shadows told me that. and also one in teh bedroom to fill in the bed. and i see another to teh left of the orange juice glass.


    however i do not agree with you that those two images that the OP posted have strobes in them, nothing in the images have any indication of that. I understand that "good" interior shots help hide strobes, but many of us are photographers and we can usually see the mechanics of photographs and where teh light falls.
     
  15. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Nearly all "professional" interior shots are shot with an UWA lens on a tripod whenever the light is best.

    And even when the light is good, flashes or cards are sometimes brought in as well.

    CPs can also help with interior shots (cutting reflections on surfaces, cabinets, etc)
     
  16. GregFarz78

    GregFarz78 New Member

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    strobist :dunno:
     
  17. vwpilot

    vwpilot New Member

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    While I do not remember where all of them are, I can tell you there were definitely more than three used in that shot. Probably at least six, maybe more. I assisted on that shoot and can tell you we dont normally use anything less than about 5 light sources (most of the time hot, sometimes strobed) when doing shots like that.

    There is at least one more light lighting up the corner and curtains behind the couch. Probably at least two in the bed room, one for overall lighting and one lighting up the lower left of the bed.

    Additionally, there was a scrim set up to cut down on the natural light coming through the window so it didnt blow out or overpower the rest of the room and we also changed every light bulb in the room to low watt bulbs (usually 25 watts or so) so they dont blow out either.

    A lot goes into well done interiors.

    Well, as I said, its a little small to be able to tell for sure, but looking at the shapes involved there, I dont see how the light could be so even without some source of artificial light in addition to the natural light. The dynamic range between natural light and the shadows it leaves are usually far too much for the camera to record and usually when you use any kind of natural light in a shot, if you arent completely blowing it out, you need something else to balance the rest of the shot.

    But without seeing a larger shot, its hard to tell for sure. But I'm making the point that natural light interior shooting is virtually impossible to do correctly. You can things ok, you can use things like "shadow/highlight" tools and Photoshop to help balance things, out, but nothing replaces well thought out lighting.
     

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